Sram guide ultimate rear brake spongy

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Sram guide ultimate rear brake spongy
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Posted: May 25, 2020 at 17:48 Quote
Brakingactionpoor wrote:
Sorry Slabshaft, your entire premise and hence instructional is fundamentally flawed - in other words, bogus science dude. Where you went wrong, and for recent readers of his instructional a warning to disregard his entire message - is assuming that you can pressurize the brake system in the first place. You can’t. Hydraulic fluid is not compressible. This is the entire principle of every hydraulic system and is basic to fluid dynamics. The bleeding technique as described by SRAM is spot on: it is aimed at one and only one goal - purging the brake lines of the only compressible element present - air. Once the air in the form of visible bubbles is purged, further pressurization of the system is a waste of time and has zero effect on the resulting brake force. I do appreciate your attempt to help slabshaft, but in the process you sadly perpetuated ignorance and misinformation. The internet can be a great source of knowledge but as with all things, don’t believe everything you read despite how attractively it is presented. I am a fluid dynamics engineer and do know my subject. Peace out, ride hard.
You’re right that it’s not a compressible fluid, but if you pardon Slabshaft his misinterpretation of the “science”, the logic and results are legit. In trying to move the bite point of the brake, his method just puts more fluid volume in the system and forces the pistons out more than SRAM’s official method. It works. Don’t be a dick.

Posted: May 26, 2020 at 10:54 Quote
I finally sorted my Guide R brakes, and they honestly feel wonderful. I used a modified version of the modified bleed method posted here.

Here is what I did. I found that if I skipped any of this, the results weren't as good. I originally just followed the modified method listed on this forum page, and it didn't give the results I wanted.

I have Guide R brakes on my Canyon Spectral AL 6. This is a new bike to me, got in December 2019, and I have only ridden it possibly 15 times since. The brakes were terrible out of the box. I could pull the levers to the bar under hard braking.

I should note that I am no mechanic. This was my first ever brake bleed

STEP ONE: Clean and exercise the pistons. This was crucial to getting a good feel on the bite. When I checked the pistons initially I was surprised to see only two working properly on each brake. I followed the instructions in these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys9bUOJ0qg0&t=412s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILsy2q-1Lqg

BE CAREFUL when bringing the pistons out. I pushed one out too far, and it almost popped clean out. Along with with a bunch of fluid. I had to put it back in, and bleed the system again, then continue with the exercising.

Once all the pistons are moving well, and pretty much in tune with each other, I moved on to the bleed.

STEP TWO: Bleed.

I followed the directions that slabshaft posted at the beginning of the forum, to the letter. I found that I had a really great bite against the bleed block, and things were feeling good. I would say take time with this. The push/pull through the whole system went pretty quickly. It did however take a lot more time to get the lever clear of bubbles. I would pull on the syringe, and HOLD it pulled until all the air bubbles come up, then compress, pump the lever, then pull again, and get more air out. I kept doing this - possibly 10 times until all the bubbles were gone.

I then put it all back together - clean up with alcohol, pads and wheel goes back.

HOWEVER, as soon as I put everything back together, and pumped the brakes a few times to get the pistons out to the pads, everything felt spongy again. Once again I could pull the levers to the bar.

I was assuming that this was because a bunch a fluid had to fill in behind the pistons as they moved out (again, I am not a mechanic here, so this could be completely BS).

FIXING THIS:
Once everything was back together, and I had pumped the brakes to get the pistons out to pads/rotor, I took it apart again. Wheel and pads come off. I then put more fluid into my bleeding edge syringe, pushed the air out of the syringe as usual. I put the syringe back into the bleeding edge port, opened it up 1/2 turn or so, and pushed more fluid in. It surprisingly took quite a bit more fluid (a good 5-10mm on the syringe). I then closed the port, made sure all was clean, and put it all back together.

The difference after this was amazing. Not much lever throw before the bite point, and a strong bite, and a lever that cannot come close to the bars.

I feel like the piston exercising was super important for getting a good strong feel to the brakes. When looking at them before I did this only a couple of pistons were moving correctly, leaving to the soggy feel to the brakes. The exercising fixed that.

Adding more fluid into the system AFTER the pistons were moved out to the pads was key in getting a solid feel in the brakes, and to stop them going to the bar.

Hope this helps people!

Posted: May 26, 2020 at 11:41 Quote
mattyinthesun wrote:
I finally sorted my Guide R brakes, and they honestly feel wonderful. I used a modified version of the modified bleed method posted here.

Here is what I did. I found that if I skipped any of this, the results weren't as good. I originally just followed the modified method listed on this forum page, and it didn't give the results I wanted.

I have Guide R brakes on my Canyon Spectral AL 6. This is a new bike to me, got in December 2019, and I have only ridden it possibly 15 times since. The brakes were terrible out of the box. I could pull the levers to the bar under hard braking.

I should note that I am no mechanic. This was my first ever brake bleed

STEP ONE: Clean and exercise the pistons. This was crucial to getting a good feel on the bite. When I checked the pistons initially I was surprised to see only two working properly on each brake. I followed the instructions in these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys9bUOJ0qg0&t=412s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILsy2q-1Lqg

BE CAREFUL when bringing the pistons out. I pushed one out too far, and it almost popped clean out. Along with with a bunch of fluid. I had to put it back in, and bleed the system again, then continue with the exercising.

Once all the pistons are moving well, and pretty much in tune with each other, I moved on to the bleed.

STEP TWO: Bleed.

I followed the directions that slabshaft posted at the beginning of the forum, to the letter. I found that I had a really great bite against the bleed block, and things were feeling good. I would say take time with this. The push/pull through the whole system went pretty quickly. It did however take a lot more time to get the lever clear of bubbles. I would pull on the syringe, and HOLD it pulled until all the air bubbles come up, then compress, pump the lever, then pull again, and get more air out. I kept doing this - possibly 10 times until all the bubbles were gone.

I then put it all back together - clean up with alcohol, pads and wheel goes back.

HOWEVER, as soon as I put everything back together, and pumped the brakes a few times to get the pistons out to the pads, everything felt spongy again. Once again I could pull the levers to the bar.

I was assuming that this was because a bunch a fluid had to fill in behind the pistons as they moved out (again, I am not a mechanic here, so this could be completely BS).

FIXING THIS:
Once everything was back together, and I had pumped the brakes to get the pistons out to pads/rotor, I took it apart again. Wheel and pads come off. I then put more fluid into my bleeding edge syringe, pushed the air out of the syringe as usual. I put the syringe back into the bleeding edge port, opened it up 1/2 turn or so, and pushed more fluid in. It surprisingly took quite a bit more fluid (a good 5-10mm on the syringe). I then closed the port, made sure all was clean, and put it all back together.

The difference after this was amazing. Not much lever throw before the bite point, and a strong bite, and a lever that cannot come close to the bars.

I feel like the piston exercising was super important for getting a good strong feel to the brakes. When looking at them before I did this only a couple of pistons were moving correctly, leaving to the soggy feel to the brakes. The exercising fixed that.

Adding more fluid into the system AFTER the pistons were moved out to the pads was key in getting a solid feel in the brakes, and to stop them going to the bar.

Hope this helps people!

So the key is to get the pistons out to where they’d be when pads and rotors are together and then add more fluid to the reservoir? Sounds like the perfect fix. Good job bro! I have Code RSC’s and plan to do this when I bleed mine.

Posted: May 26, 2020 at 12:46 Quote
gnarcissistictendency wrote:
mattyinthesun wrote:
I finally sorted my Guide R brakes, and they honestly feel wonderful. I used a modified version of the modified bleed method posted here.

Here is what I did. I found that if I skipped any of this, the results weren't as good. I originally just followed the modified method listed on this forum page, and it didn't give the results I wanted.

I have Guide R brakes on my Canyon Spectral AL 6. This is a new bike to me, got in December 2019, and I have only ridden it possibly 15 times since. The brakes were terrible out of the box. I could pull the levers to the bar under hard braking.

I should note that I am no mechanic. This was my first ever brake bleed

STEP ONE: Clean and exercise the pistons. This was crucial to getting a good feel on the bite. When I checked the pistons initially I was surprised to see only two working properly on each brake. I followed the instructions in these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys9bUOJ0qg0&t=412s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILsy2q-1Lqg

BE CAREFUL when bringing the pistons out. I pushed one out too far, and it almost popped clean out. Along with with a bunch of fluid. I had to put it back in, and bleed the system again, then continue with the exercising.

Once all the pistons are moving well, and pretty much in tune with each other, I moved on to the bleed.

STEP TWO: Bleed.

I followed the directions that slabshaft posted at the beginning of the forum, to the letter. I found that I had a really great bite against the bleed block, and things were feeling good. I would say take time with this. The push/pull through the whole system went pretty quickly. It did however take a lot more time to get the lever clear of bubbles. I would pull on the syringe, and HOLD it pulled until all the air bubbles come up, then compress, pump the lever, then pull again, and get more air out. I kept doing this - possibly 10 times until all the bubbles were gone.

I then put it all back together - clean up with alcohol, pads and wheel goes back.

HOWEVER, as soon as I put everything back together, and pumped the brakes a few times to get the pistons out to the pads, everything felt spongy again. Once again I could pull the levers to the bar.

I was assuming that this was because a bunch a fluid had to fill in behind the pistons as they moved out (again, I am not a mechanic here, so this could be completely BS).

FIXING THIS:
Once everything was back together, and I had pumped the brakes to get the pistons out to pads/rotor, I took it apart again. Wheel and pads come off. I then put more fluid into my bleeding edge syringe, pushed the air out of the syringe as usual. I put the syringe back into the bleeding edge port, opened it up 1/2 turn or so, and pushed more fluid in. It surprisingly took quite a bit more fluid (a good 5-10mm on the syringe). I then closed the port, made sure all was clean, and put it all back together.

The difference after this was amazing. Not much lever throw before the bite point, and a strong bite, and a lever that cannot come close to the bars.

I feel like the piston exercising was super important for getting a good strong feel to the brakes. When looking at them before I did this only a couple of pistons were moving correctly, leaving to the soggy feel to the brakes. The exercising fixed that.

Adding more fluid into the system AFTER the pistons were moved out to the pads was key in getting a solid feel in the brakes, and to stop them going to the bar.

Hope this helps people!

So the key is to get the pistons out to where they’d be when pads and rotors are together and then add more fluid to the reservoir? Sounds like the perfect fix. Good job bro! I have Code RSC’s and plan to do this when I bleed mine.

That is what I did - My basic knowledge of this led me to think that the system was using all in the reservoir to "back fill" the space where the pistons were in the housing. Adding more fluid seems like a logical step. If you add too much, then you end up forcing the pistons out a bit, and get rub. You can always then just release some of the pressure but opening the bleed screw on the lever and letting a little fluid out.

I guess you could do this step with the wheel and pad in, if you are super careful. Then if you do overfill, and get a bunch of brake rub, it would be faster to release some of that pressure (at the lever end), and check to see whether you are still rubbing. Given how clean the bleeding edge port process is, I feel like this wouldn't be too risky - especially if you had some towel around the port.

Posted: May 26, 2020 at 21:13 Quote
mattyinthesun wrote:
gnarcissistictendency wrote:
mattyinthesun wrote:
I finally sorted my Guide R brakes, and they honestly feel wonderful. I used a modified version of the modified bleed method posted here.

Here is what I did. I found that if I skipped any of this, the results weren't as good. I originally just followed the modified method listed on this forum page, and it didn't give the results I wanted.

I have Guide R brakes on my Canyon Spectral AL 6. This is a new bike to me, got in December 2019, and I have only ridden it possibly 15 times since. The brakes were terrible out of the box. I could pull the levers to the bar under hard braking.

I should note that I am no mechanic. This was my first ever brake bleed

STEP ONE: Clean and exercise the pistons. This was crucial to getting a good feel on the bite. When I checked the pistons initially I was surprised to see only two working properly on each brake. I followed the instructions in these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys9bUOJ0qg0&t=412s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILsy2q-1Lqg

BE CAREFUL when bringing the pistons out. I pushed one out too far, and it almost popped clean out. Along with with a bunch of fluid. I had to put it back in, and bleed the system again, then continue with the exercising.

Once all the pistons are moving well, and pretty much in tune with each other, I moved on to the bleed.

STEP TWO: Bleed.

I followed the directions that slabshaft posted at the beginning of the forum, to the letter. I found that I had a really great bite against the bleed block, and things were feeling good. I would say take time with this. The push/pull through the whole system went pretty quickly. It did however take a lot more time to get the lever clear of bubbles. I would pull on the syringe, and HOLD it pulled until all the air bubbles come up, then compress, pump the lever, then pull again, and get more air out. I kept doing this - possibly 10 times until all the bubbles were gone.

I then put it all back together - clean up with alcohol, pads and wheel goes back.

HOWEVER, as soon as I put everything back together, and pumped the brakes a few times to get the pistons out to the pads, everything felt spongy again. Once again I could pull the levers to the bar.

I was assuming that this was because a bunch a fluid had to fill in behind the pistons as they moved out (again, I am not a mechanic here, so this could be completely BS).

FIXING THIS:
Once everything was back together, and I had pumped the brakes to get the pistons out to pads/rotor, I took it apart again. Wheel and pads come off. I then put more fluid into my bleeding edge syringe, pushed the air out of the syringe as usual. I put the syringe back into the bleeding edge port, opened it up 1/2 turn or so, and pushed more fluid in. It surprisingly took quite a bit more fluid (a good 5-10mm on the syringe). I then closed the port, made sure all was clean, and put it all back together.

The difference after this was amazing. Not much lever throw before the bite point, and a strong bite, and a lever that cannot come close to the bars.

I feel like the piston exercising was super important for getting a good strong feel to the brakes. When looking at them before I did this only a couple of pistons were moving correctly, leaving to the soggy feel to the brakes. The exercising fixed that.

Adding more fluid into the system AFTER the pistons were moved out to the pads was key in getting a solid feel in the brakes, and to stop them going to the bar.

Hope this helps people!

So the key is to get the pistons out to where they’d be when pads and rotors are together and then add more fluid to the reservoir? Sounds like the perfect fix. Good job bro! I have Code RSC’s and plan to do this when I bleed mine.

That is what I did - My basic knowledge of this led me to think that the system was using all in the reservoir to "back fill" the space where the pistons were in the housing. Adding more fluid seems like a logical step. If you add too much, then you end up forcing the pistons out a bit, and get rub. You can always then just release some of the pressure but opening the bleed screw on the lever and letting a little fluid out.

I guess you could do this step with the wheel and pad in, if you are super careful. Then if you do overfill, and get a bunch of brake rub, it would be faster to release some of that pressure (at the lever end), and check to see whether you are still rubbing. Given how clean the bleeding edge port process is, I feel like this wouldn't be too risky - especially if you had some towel around the port.

did you put the bleed block back in the last time?

Posted: May 26, 2020 at 21:55 Quote
Nope - I didn’t put a block in. I didn’t want to do anything that might push the pistons back. I guess you could if one of the supplied blocks fit perfectly. You could even leave the pads in and just put a pad spacer or cardboard between the pads. It’s a super clean addition of fluid via the bleed port, so the risk of getting any on the pads is pretty low.

Posted: May 27, 2020 at 6:00 Quote
When I first read this method, I had JUST gone through the bleed process per the manual and was trying to troubleshoot the rear.

I fixed it in less than 10 minutes by putting the bleed block back in, hooking up only the bleeding edge syringe, and pushing a few extra ml of fluid. As the OP stated, maybe a 6/10 push to hold pressure on the system while I closed the port.

I put the pads back in and gently pumped the lever a few times to work the pistons all the way out, pushed them back, and repeated a few times until they were advancing equally. Apparently this lubes the seals. Pushed them back one more time, reinstalled the wheel, and had notably better lever feel. Maybe I just got lucky not having to bleed off any pressure, but it matched my front lever feel perfectly.

Posted: Jun 15, 2020 at 16:56 Quote
I just want to add my experience with my guide T brakes. I bought purchased my bike from another pinkbike user who built it up from buysell parts but sold it after one ride. So I assume he didn't have time to go through and notice how soft the brakes actually felt. Following the GMBN instructions along with slabshafts modifications really did help. The real difference maker was pushing in the extra amount of fluid through the bleeding edge port after you close back up the system. I did experience some pretty significant pad rubbing but the burping method did alleviate those issues. I feel like I could actually increase the responsiveness even more now that I have experience in the process. I may be doing another bleed this weekend to see how if I can tune them up a bit more.

I will also add that after getting them to where they felt really good there was a minuscule amount of rub left. Like, I would a very high pitch screech would be emitted if I barely moved my rear tire. There is no noise being emitted during regular riding so I assume this is the slight amount of pad rub that slab talks about at the end of his post.

For anyone that finds this thread at a later date I highly suggest investing in a good bleed kit. I got the SRAM pro bleed kit and it was so much easier having the proper tools for the job. I would also highly suggest that if you are having these issues to do the work yourself. The process is not that difficult and there are so many resources available. You will learn a lot about your brakes and how they work if you perform the maintenance yourself instead of taking it to a local bike shop.

I also only did this with my rear brake. The front was already a bit stronger but I will be going through the whole process again this weekend with the front brake to tune it up.

Posted: Jun 15, 2020 at 17:56 Quote
bryannn wrote:
I just want to add my experience with my guide T brakes. I bought purchased my bike from another pinkbike user who built it up from buysell parts but sold it after one ride. So I assume he didn't have time to go through and notice how soft the brakes actually felt. Following the GMBN instructions along with slabshafts modifications really did help. The real difference maker was pushing in the extra amount of fluid through the bleeding edge port after you close back up the system. I did experience some pretty significant pad rubbing but the burping method did alleviate those issues. I feel like I could actually increase the responsiveness even more now that I have experience in the process. I may be doing another bleed this weekend to see how if I can tune them up a bit more.

I will also add that after getting them to where they felt really good there was a minuscule amount of rub left. Like, I would a very high pitch screech would be emitted if I barely moved my rear tire. There is no noise being emitted during regular riding so I assume this is the slight amount of pad rub that slab talks about at the end of his post.

For anyone that finds this thread at a later date I highly suggest investing in a good bleed kit. I got the SRAM pro bleed kit and it was so much easier having the proper tools for the job. I would also highly suggest that if you are having these issues to do the work yourself. The process is not that difficult and there are so many resources available. You will learn a lot about your brakes and how they work if you perform the maintenance yourself instead of taking it to a local bike shop.

I also only did this with my rear brake. The front was already a bit stronger but I will be going through the whole process again this weekend with the front brake to tune it up.

Thats good to hear! So im wondering if you are able to do like a mini bleed similar to how you would on shimano to help with lever feel and contact adjustment...?

Posted: Jun 18, 2020 at 10:27 Quote
Legend

slabshaft wrote:
Problem: My Guide R brakes were always mushy and I could easily pull them to the handlebar. The bike still stopped, but it’s very awkward and just plain stupid that I have to pull the grips all the way to the bar. This mushy feeling was due to air in the system, not enough fluid in the system, or ‘not being pressurize’ (which will make sense if you watch this video). They’ve been like this since the brakes/bike were brand new.
Bleeding them to either this video below, or the official SRAM bleed procedure video did literally nothing at all to improve this mushy feel.

But…I think I cracked the code on how to fix this, at least for my opinion of what the brakes should feel like…and these Guide R brakes should feel as good as XT brakes!
Watch this entire video first from GMBN Tech:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp_s-CK9CwA

This video is very detailed, does a great job of explaining all the tools/steps and it seems to match the official SRAM bleed process.
I’m referencing this video because it feels more thought out/slower paced compared to the official SRAM video. My mods apply to this or SRAM’s video, but these time stamps below reference the GMBN Tech video, not the SRAM video.

My mods apply to just BEFORE removal of the fitting from the brake lever at around the 11:42 mark.

Some notes from this video:
11:32, he closes the Bleeding Edge fitting…this is correct, you have to do this to pull air out of the lever!

11:42, he mentions “pressurize the system”, this is the catch…he’s right, the system DOES need to be pressurized...keep reading.

11:52, he mentions “pull the lever in and release”.

12:01, he mentions “pulling up on the syringe” (to pull out air bubbles), then he pushes down on the syringe to pressurize the lever again, but I do this step differently.

12:11, he mentions “push back in one time hard to pressurize the system”…but, the step below ruins this!

12:34, he has the syringe clamp closed and unscrews the fitting from the lever. THIS STEP IS THE PROBLEM!!
If the “system has to be pressurized”, removing the lever syringe fitting exposes the fluid to the atmosphere, instantly losing ALL pressure in the system!! For me, this resulted in a brake that was literally just as mushy after bleeding as before I started…what was the purpose of even bleeding them if it makes zero difference?

Here are the process mods below I made that resulted in a firm lever feel, which I could no longer pull to the handlebar, which was every bit as good as the XT brakes on my other bike.
One disclaimer first: As I have repeated these mods a few times, there is a risk: There could be TOO MUCH pressure in the system, resulting in pads that always rub on the disc because the pistons cannot retract into their bores. I mention how to fix this later…
1. For pulling air out of the lever:
a. At the 11:52 and 12:01 steps:
b. Here is my mod:
i. Make sure to pull as much vacuum as you can on the syringe AS YOU PULL THE LEVER IN AND RELEASE!
ii. Pull vacuum and hold it for several seconds…pull lever in…release lever…repeat. Do this at least 5-6 times.
c. Then push the syringe in one final time. Even though you will lose this pressure when you remove the fitting from the lever, it’s required to ensure the reservoir in the lever is full.
i. While pushing down on syringe, pull the lever in. It probably feels like you want it to, right!?
d. Remove the fitting from the lever and you’ll notice it instantly releases any pressurization you achieved, along with a fair amount of fluid getting pushed out…resulting in zero internal system pressure.
i. You probably now have a lever that is just as mushy as when you started, at least I did, not matter how well I performed the process. Keep reading.
e. Reinstall the lever plug, clean everything up.

2. Here is the mod that made ALL the difference for me:
a. Go back to the Bleeding Edge fitting at the caliper.
b. OPEN it back up, then WHILE PUSHING IN ON THE SYRINGE pretty hard, CLOSE the Bleeding Edge fitting:
i. If you imagine pressing on the syringe on a scale from 0 (not pushing) to 10 (pushing as hard as you can), push at about a 6-7.
c. This is the ONLY way you will achieve internal pressure in the system above atmospheric pressure, which is to pressurize while closing the system!

3. Put everything back to normal, install all the pads, clips, wheels, etc.

4. Remember the disclaimer above?
a. If you spin the wheel, are the pads obviously rubbing a lot?
i. Meaning the wheel spins less than 2-3 revolutions.
ii. If this is true, you have to release some pressure/fluid from the system.
b. Go back to the lever plug, curl some paper towels around the plug, but ensure you can still see the plug, and see if/when fluid comes out.
c. You need to ‘burp’ the plug…open it gradually until some fluid pushes out, it may push out quickly, so be ready!
d. Once you see several drops worth of fluid come out, quickly re-tighten the lever plug.
e. Do the pad rubbing/wheel spin test again.
f. Repeat this burping process a few more times as required.

5. For me, this process resulted in a ‘better than new’ feeling in both levers, just as good as my XT brakes.

6. There was some residual brake pad rubbing, like I had just put in new pads. This will go away after a few rides, just like it does with new pads. As the pads wear slightly, they create a clearance gap, resulting in zero rubbing.
a. When you eventually have to replace pads, I imagine you’ll have to ‘burp’ the system again so the pistons retract in their bores sufficient to install the new thicker pads.

I know that was a lot of words to describe two relatively simple mods, but I wanted to be as detailed as I could, because bleeding the Guide R brakes is a huge butt-pain relative to XT brakes, and I’ve done both brands numerous times now. And in the future, if I have to get new brakes, or build a new bike…I’ll probably just use XT from the beginning. At least with these procedure mods above, my Guide R brakes don’t completely suck until that time comes.

If you have questions, please let me know. If you have helpful tips, add them to this thread!

Or if you’re a turd and just want to talk trash, go get a girlfriend and spend less time on the internet. Or use these tips to fix your brakes and go ride. Either way you’ll be a lot less of a turd.

Posted: Jul 9, 2020 at 19:55 Quote
Thanks for the precise details. I've been bleeding my breaks countless times, according to the video...you made the change !!!

Posted: Jul 9, 2020 at 22:07 Quote
I just made a custom bleeding block that is thinner than the SRAM one. Same results - allows to pump more fluid to the system.

Posted: 3 days ago Quote
Hey Everyone, I still think this is a great thread to reference when bleeding SRAM brakes with the bleeding edge port. Last time I used the techniques listed here to bleed my rear and it turned out pretty good. I went and serviced my front end today and I think I got even better results. I was thinking it may be due to the shorter line required from handlebar to brake but that's not totally relevant.

Does anyone have an opinion on how much rub is too much when calling it good. I know one of the posts did list that having a little rub is fine when using the modified technique and the pads will rub down after a bit. I experienced this on my rear side and it worked out fine. The pads got a little more clearance after ~10 miles. My front seems to be a bit tighter though for some reason. When trying to free spin the wheel on the stand I got about two full rotations before it stopped. My rear still feels pretty good and that thing spins pretty freely. Should I just wait it out and assume pads will rub out more clearance just like last time?

Posted: 15 hours ago Quote
fimabike wrote:
I just made a custom bleeding block that is thinner than the SRAM one. Same results - allows to pump more fluid to the system.

This is exactly what you need. The SRAM bleeding block is too wide, so when the system is "full" with the bleed block in, theres still a few mm of play in the pistons.

What I do is bleed by whatever method you like. Then put the pads back in and I use the pad spreader. I measure about a mm or 2 larger than my rotor, and then insert the pad spreader to that thickness. Then add the last little bit of juice from the bleeding edge. Nice firm levers with no rub

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