Quitting this hobby

Author Message
Posted: Jul 26, 2016 at 1:13 Quote
@dirtrider76 I guess the whole "prove myself" is essentially what the struggle is! It's a proving myself to myself kinda thing. Nuts! I wonder what that says about my character haha. Oh dear...but it's indeed something like that.

Posted: Jul 26, 2016 at 9:08 Quote
It's not a job, you're doing for fun. If it makes you feel frustrated you're definitely doing something wrong.
If you can't ride often enough, lower your expectations and enjoy every ride. Don't focus on performance, just try to have a good time.

You are very young and bikes are not the most important thing in the world (yes, they are good, but they're not everything).

Posted: Jul 26, 2016 at 18:01 Quote
fr3er1d3r wrote:
@dirtrider76 I guess the whole "prove myself" is essentially what the struggle is! It's a proving myself to myself kinda thing. Nuts! I wonder what that says about my character haha. Oh dear...but it's indeed something like that.


Just go ride bikes and have fun, that's what its all about. If you don't smile when your on the bike something is wrong, you have to ride for yourself. Oddly enough when I try to go fast and push hard there is little reward for the extra effort. When I go out and just ride with no expectations and I end up destroying a section I'm super stoked though.

Posted: Jul 27, 2016 at 22:44 Quote
I went through the same thing a little while ago, i was seriously thinking about quitting. i was feeling pressure by myself to do bigger jumps and drops. i stopped riding so much difficult stuff and started going out for easy rides. On these easy rides, i spent a lot of time on fire roads and just having fun mucking around. I found my love for the sport and im now a much faster and bullsier rider than i used to be. What im saying is, ride easier tracks, get faster on them, and then come back to harder riding. TRUST ME. it works

Posted: Jul 27, 2016 at 22:45 Quote
Jack-T-Media wrote:
I went through the same thing a little while ago, i was seriously thinking about quitting. i was feeling pressure by myself to do bigger jumps and drops. i stopped riding so much difficult stuff and started going out for easy rides. On these easy rides, i spent a lot of time on fire roads and just having fun mucking around. I found my love for the sport and im now a much faster and bullsier rider than i used to be. What im saying is, ride easier tracks, get faster on them, and then come back to harder riding. TRUST ME. it works

Oh, and also, ride for yourself, not anyone else. go out and just enjoy the easy stuff, that will make the hard stuff more fun when you come back

Posted: Jul 27, 2016 at 23:38 Quote
fr3er1d3r wrote:
with adulthood kicking in between me and my friends, it's difficult to find the time to ride. Everything is a drive and schedules are in constant conflict..

due to how little riding I get. ... Not getting enough riding ...

Getting older ... not getting the time in that is necessary .


You need to get a grip on your life and stop whining. Go back to school and get a job that allows for plenty of riding.

If riding is your priority (it's mine), you have to make it happen, that's all...

Posted: Jul 28, 2016 at 0:53 Quote
Mountain-Dalek wrote:
fr3er1d3r wrote:
with adulthood kicking in between me and my friends, it's difficult to find the time to ride. Everything is a drive and schedules are in constant conflict..

due to how little riding I get. ... Not getting enough riding ...

Getting older ... not getting the time in that is necessary .


You need to get a grip on your life and stop whining. Go back to school and get a job that allows for plenty of riding.

If riding is your priority (it's mine), you have to make it happen, that's all...

Your suggestions are pretty irrelevant but they managed to be insulting (a little but I know you didn't read up on where I'm coming from so let me clarify.)

I've got a lot of time but the hobby had a lot to do with friends and local spots, both of which are gone or mostly unavailable. It's either time to relocate to a place where mountain biking is much more accessible, but that just can't be my top priority when it comes to where I'm moving but friends would come with location. Or just deal with the long drives which I'd have to make frequently and almost always alone, or just move on from the hobby and maybe come back to it in the future.

I'm committing to the long drive thing and trying to find more friends and if I'm just not excited by it anymore, then I'll throw in the towel. Maybe I've had my time with this hobby and it's time to just call it as so. I'm committing the time necessary to be sure of this decision. Not sure how long that'll be but I'll just play that by ear.

Posted: Jul 28, 2016 at 1:03 Quote
When I was around 14-17, I was biking every single day because I had friends that would everyday. Even when they weren't available, my spots were and I had a few good ones. Sometime through 17, all the spots were destroyed and some were replaced with housing/building development (lame) and it was just down to the out of town spots.

With no local spots, we had less to ride. Going out of town could only happen so often and the things we were doing got scary very quickly with a couple weeks out of any real practice. So the things out of town became too intimidating as we no longer had the local stuff to keep us in check on the 20-35ft jumps and what not. Then the trails out of town became less fun and so on...a few years later, here I am, trying to prove myself to myself on the bike and I'm pretty tired of it. Nothing anywhere I can think of to work myself up to what was once routine. Proving myself to myself is just who I am. I don't have to with everything I do, but most things I took seriously or had a lot of fun with are that way. Mountain biking is no exception.

Literally have to move to be within reasonable distance and maybe lucky enough to find a local spot or accept driving a total of 1.5-4+ hours a few times a week to keep up. I don't see those things happening before moving on. A local spot would be great but I've tried and tried with that.

Posted: Jul 28, 2016 at 5:21 Quote
Sorry, I didn’t meant to be insulting or disrespectful and I apologize.

I’ve read your background and I know a bit of what you dealing with. But you really need to address this question for once: “Do I want to ride mtb as much as possible? Or am I done with it?”.

If the answer is “yes I want” there’re plenty of solutions. But they might involve some serious compromises, some hard decisions, some “casualties”, like moving away, “losing” friends, being away from family, not having that exact job you wanted… it’s called Life.

I was like you, from 14-21 y.o. I’d ride the sh*t out of me every day always pushing harder, then came work, responsibilities (eeew), life in the city… and without even noticing it I ended up riding about 3-4 times a month, lived a stressful life (was an actuary), got into bad stuff (mmmkay)… finally got depressed…

Then, it took me a while, but it became clear that I had to get back on the saddle for real ASAP. I went back to school at age 28 (tough man, tough!), got a master degree so I could teach at college level and be on vacations about 4 months a years and have a very flexible schedule during school time. I got a job (had to wait 2 years) far from the city where there’s plenty of mountains and now, since I’m 33 ( 40 now), I ride the sh*t out of me (almost) every day, plennnnty of chairlifted DH sessions, all-mountain, XC and even a bit of road! Plenty of bike trips too! Yes, I suffered multiple casualties: I live away from my family (sorry mom I love you), I don’t earn as much money as I’d like to (who doesn’t?), I’ve lost friends because of the distance, I have to ride alone 85% of the time (most of my friends don’t have 4 moths vacations…).

But, like pigman65 said, I regret every single day I have not ridden. And now when I see some 50+ y.o. guys still riding their DH-rigs out-of-control fast, I know I’ve made a good life decision. Riding a mtb solves 99,8% of all my problems and it’s a hell of a fun too! But yes it's dangerous, you have to be able to bear that risk.

Like arnie86 says, maybe if you step back and take a break, you’ll realize how much mtb, spec DH, gives you. If you’re really hooked, you’ll be back! Anything else more fun than DH would be more dangerous IMO.

I wish you luck with that “crisis”. Ride safe!

Posted: Jul 28, 2016 at 13:08 Quote
Welce to this thing called "life." It's something we all experience as we get older. You can A) Keep complaining about it or B) Tackled your problems head on and manage the available time in your life wisely.

Often you will have to make sacrifices you don't want but it's something everyone experiences.

Posted: Jul 28, 2016 at 15:06 Quote
Well the sacrifice part is clear, it's just master of sacrificing the hobby or the other things to keep it alive. I just don't feel as passionate about it as I did so the time off makes the most sense to me.

I do understand the sacrifices that are necessary and it's starting to look like I'm simply not as into it as I was. But time will reveal the truth...it's hard to know I really feel but I'll try to get back on the saddle this season but I'm likely to take quite some time off after.

I appreciate you clarifying, @mountain-dalek

Posted: Jul 28, 2016 at 15:18 Quote
Don't look at it that way. Be grateful you belong to a socio economic class that has allowed you to hone your skills in such a sport that the majority of the world could never dream of. Be grateful you developed the skills you have to create such a strong foundation to rely on for years to come.

If you truly feel that way...take a step back from the sport and see what happens. You also can live in a location that allows you to work a professional career that still fosters to outdoor activity. I live in SLC and can ride 7 days a week working full time if I so choose.

Posted: Jul 28, 2016 at 15:44 Quote
a-prince wrote:
Don't look at it that way. Be grateful you belong to a socio economic class that has allowed you to hone your skills in such a sport that the majority of the world could never dream of. Be grateful you developed the skills you have to create such a strong foundation to rely on for years to come.

If you truly feel that way...take a step back from the sport and see what happens. You also can live in a location that allows you to work a professional career that still fosters to outdoor activity. I live in SLC and can ride 7 days a week working full time if I so choose.

I don't know what to say. One thing I've realized in my point of crisis is that being grateful isn't a reason to be happy. They are completely separate things but it's hard to accept unhappiness when I have so much to be grateful for, or at least it was for quite some time. Understanding that they are separate things led me to focus on the things that contributed to my happiness. It comes from a kind of satisfaction I may no longer get through biking. Again, we'll see. The only way there would be potential for that kind of satisfaction through biking is if I got a lot more of it in. Honestly, it's hard to imagine anything will compare to having my own spots...building whatever you wanted and slowly adjusting your comfort zone and skill level however you imagined. That, as opposed to getting used to whatever is around you made a big difference. I miss that for sure.

So I think I must take that step back. It means selling the bikes for now. Really feeling the void of the sport to see if I truly miss it or not. The only reason I seem to ride recently is because I have the bikes and want to make use of them but it's mostly a chore at that point.

Posted: Jul 29, 2016 at 4:03 Quote
Mountain Dalek sums things up nicely. I think a lot of people experience this at some level in their riding career. In terms of sacrifice, it's all relative. For me, I live in an area that is not exactly the cultural center of the world. People you age, if educated, move away due to lack of decent jobs. Those who aren't fortunate enough to be educated are stuck here and work shitty low wage jobs catering to tourists and outlet shoppers. And very few of them take advantage of what the outdoors here have to offer.

I've been lucky enough to figure out how to live comfortably while staying here. I'm pretty much broke but my tastes are simple and practical. I don't need the best most expensive gear, just gear that works well. Ex: I'll opt for alloy frames over carbon for example.

And I worked my ass off when I was your age, sacrificed time to travel and party and do a lot of the fun stuff people your age do, and instead bought a house. Worked my ass off, paid the house off by age 30. Managed to get jobs I the bike business. Mostly as a mechanic. So busy keeping others riding that I barely got to ride sometimes. But it's amazing how having a place to live with no mortgage or rent frees up your time later. The town is kinda lame but out my front door, the woods and mountains are friggen awesome. I do t live here for the town, I live here for what is outside of town.

Sometimes I wish I had played more in my 20's. But then I go ride. Almost every day and will for the foreseeable future. I think I made the right choice.

You're young. Nothing's written in stone. Think long and hard about what your want and when you figure it out, do whatever it takes to make it happen.


 
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