Upgrading Rear Shock for Trek Remedy- Details on how to do it and what to use

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Upgrading Rear Shock for Trek Remedy- Details on how to do it and what to use
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Posted: Nov 21, 2016 at 14:16 Quote
Hey everyone, I recently did a shock swap for a Trek Remedy, I know this is something that is incredibly difficult to find information on and what I learned doing the swap may be interesting for some of you who want to take your Remedy to the next level. I have a 2013 Trek Remedy, I love this bike to death, it has been reliable and an all-around great trail bike for me. I ride this bike on everything from fast flowing single track to bike park and heavy technical trails, it is truly a do it all bike. The one area in particular I thought this bike has always been lacking was the rear shock. When building this bike, Trek teamed up with Fox for this bike and created a reasonable quality shock (the DCRV) to be paired with the EVO linkage that the Remedy uses. The only issue with this is that they also use a proprietary mount where the upper shock mounts thread into the shock body its self rather than going through an islet like a normal shock and linkage. This is a real issue if you’re trying upgrade the shock on your bike and there is minimal advice on the internet on how to do this. I got fed up with the lack of tune-ability that the DCRV shock had and decided to take a shot in the dark and fit a Cane Creek DB inline to my remedy which turned out to be incredible, the bike feels so much better and the new shock really allowed me to tune the bike to use the travel the way I wanted.

To begin with, I had to figure out the proper shock size (islet to islet) and the correct stroke length (the distance the shock itself compresses) for the Remedy. For bikes made between 2010 and 2013, the correct size is 7.875 X 2.25 (size X stroke), this fits perfectly on the linkage and maintains proper geometry and wheel movement as the shock moves through the travel. The next issue that comes into play is how to mount the new shock on the original linkage. To begin with, I went to a company called Offset Bushings (offsetbushings.com). These guys are great, you tell them the shock and the bike you would like it mounted on and for a reasonable price, they custom make you either standard or offset suspension bushings for that combination. Although either will work for this application, I decided to go for the offset bushings to help slacken the bike out a little extra and help with cornering (because enduro Wink ). They ship anywhere in the world and are a really great company to work with. Once all the parts arrived, assembly was fairly straight forward. The bottom islet uses a frame specific piece of hardware for the Remedy which fits perfectly in the new bushings and lets the new shock mount similarly to the way the bottom of the old shock mounted. The top islet on the other hand is a little bit more difficult because you can no longer use the original hardware from the bike. The inner diameter of the bearings on the top of the EVO link are 10mm, I went to Lowes and picked up a M10-1.50 x 100 bolt from their hardware section (essentially a bolt with a diameter of 10mm and a solid portion with threads on the end) and the matching nut and washers for it. I then put the new hardware on the bike which required me to use the old black washers which came from the old upper shock mounts in addition to the new spacers provided by Offset Bushings. Finally once everything was mounted on the bike, I used a hacksaw and file to cut down the end of the bolt flush with the nut on the linkage so that it didn’t cut my leg and looked clean.

The end result is a perfectly functioning new shock on your old bike! I hope this helps answer any question you may have if you are doing something similar on you Remedy.




Posted: Jul 28, 2017 at 11:53 Quote
Hey! That's awesome! I want to do something similar. I have a 2011 Remedy 9.9 - Do you think a cane creek DB Air IL will work?

Posted: Sep 11, 2017 at 13:41 Quote
bwillia223 wrote:
Hey! That's awesome! I want to do something similar. I have a 2011 Remedy 9.9 - Do you think a cane creek DB Air IL will work?
yeah that should work perfect for you, id recommend the DB coil instead of the DB air

Posted: Sep 13, 2017 at 18:08 Quote
Did you ever get a part number for the bushings?

Posted: Nov 9, 2017 at 9:39 Quote
well the bushings were custom made for the application by offsetbushings.com so there isnt really a part number for them. You just give them your specifications and they make something that fits.

Posted: Nov 13, 2017 at 13:17 Quote
search it trek remedy coil conversion
The "unclesomebody". link is a walk through with Fox part numbers
I went with a shoulder bolt cap type head or threaded dowel pin from McMastercarr
My knees/ankles didn't like the look of the hex heads

It's easy

Posted: Dec 4, 2017 at 11:41 Quote
Anyone put a longer stroke shock on their Remedy? 60mm instead of 57.5mm?

Posted: Dec 27, 2018 at 15:30 Quote
Hey! So I've decided to get the same shock as you. I'll be throwing it on my 2011 remedy. You mentioned you got it slackened out a bit more. How much more did you ask offsetbushings to change the bushings?

Have you had any problems with the shocks seals?

Posted: Dec 30, 2018 at 14:21 Quote
bwillia223 wrote:
Hey! So I've decided to get the same shock as you. I'll be throwing it on my 2011 remedy. You mentioned you got it slackened out a bit more. How much more did you ask offsetbushings to change the bushings?

Have you had any problems with the shocks seals?

Hello! I run offsetbushings.com so I can help explain this a little..

When running an aftermarket (200mm long) shock on the remedy which was designed for a 197mm shock, you will need a pair of Offset Bushings to maintain stock geometry. You won't slacken it any further than stock with the aftermarket shock as there isn't enough room for offset. I'll explain why below..

The top bolt is 10mm, allowing 1mm of offset.
The bottom bolt is 8mm, allowing 2mm of offset.

Conveniently, with 3mm of total reduction you can run the aftermarket shock. There's no more room for more offset than that though.

I made a product specifically for the Trek shock conversion kit, here - https://www.offsetbushings.com/products/trek-conversion-kit

As much as I try and check this often, you'll get a reply in under an hour usually if you just email us direct. All the details are on our contact page.

Hope that helps!

Posted: Jan 29, 2019 at 5:58 Quote
Jezzah,
Thanks for that info! So, if I were to out a longer stroke on my bike, it will screw up the geometry?

Thanks
Brad

Posted: Feb 3, 2019 at 18:15 Quote
I know I'm a little late to the party, but does anyone have feedback with this kind of upgrade?

I was going to rebuild my 2011 with a fox 36 front and dpx2 rear. I know I'll forever be stuck with 26s but I'm cool with that.

Does the rear shock make a huge difference or is the geometry an issue? Is the 2011 frame just too outdated?

Thanks, Zack

Posted: Mar 6, 2019 at 9:38 Quote
zabarnes14 wrote:
I know I'm a little late to the party, but does anyone have feedback with this kind of upgrade?

I was going to rebuild my 2011 with a fox 36 front and dpx2 rear. I know I'll forever be stuck with 26s but I'm cool with that.

Does the rear shock make a huge difference or is the geometry an issue? Is the 2011 frame just too outdated?

Thanks, Zack

Again, a slightly late reply here!

Yes, our customers have found there to be a huge improvement from moving away from the stock shock. We sell these kits every day so there's certainly a lot of interest in upgrading from the stock DRCV shocks.

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