Moto C2R - who's got one and settings

PB Forum :: Marzocchi
Moto C2R - who's got one and settings
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Message
Posted: Dec 9, 2017 at 23:27 Quote
Like the title says, who has one? Base line settings? Have the progressive boost or not? Only a few reviews out there currently.

Thanks!

Posted: Dec 10, 2017 at 0:26 Quote
I have had 2 of these shocks, and currently still have one. I had a 10.5x3.5 on my older Wilson carbon with the PB, and have an 8.5x2.5 on my Spartan without the PB. Its the best shock I've ridden to date, so smooth over all the bumps. Sorry that I've not offered much substance here, I will provide more thorough information in the next few days when I can get a bit more time to write up a longer post. Also, if enough people are interested, when I go to service my moto c2r in the next month or so I can write up a guide with pictures for anyone interested in servicing their own shock.

Posted: Dec 10, 2017 at 8:23 Quote
That would be great. Ran a 9.5x3 on the last bike and will throw one on the next. Smooth through anything I could throw at it and very predictable.

Posted: Dec 17, 2017 at 15:32 Quote
A couple people have asked, so I will do a small review on the Moto C2R.

rider weight: 150lbs

Settings:
Spartan: 350lb/inch spring
rebound: There are so many clicks of adjustment, I'm usually somewhere in the middle of the range, I don't have a click count as the shock is apart for service currently.
Compression: I have been running 5 clicks of low speed compression and 3 clicks of high speed compression

I currently have one on a Devinci Spartan Carbon (non PB 8.5x2.5) and had one on my older style Wilson Carbon (PB 10.5x3.5), both are fairly progressive frames so they work quite well with coil shocks, different bikes will be a different story. I will break this review into small chunks focusing on certain aspects of the shock.

Beginning stroke:

Probably the most notable thing about this shock is how little force is required to activate it. You can push down on the saddle of your bike with one finger and it will start to move. The skf seals in the seal head are to attribute to this as well as the very light amount of squeeze on the o-ring for the IFP. This shock simply erases small chatter in the beginning of the stroke. As a example of how little friction is present in this shock system and how good the bump absorbtion is, I was running a 200lb/inch spring on the Wilson on the stock vivid r2c, I had to bump up to 250 lbs spring with the moto C2R when I put it on the Wilson. The shock felt even softer with the 250 lbs spring on the wilson than the vivid with the 200 lbs spring. Seriously, there were many times where I thought I had a flat tire, but it was just the shock working so well.

The rest of the stroke:

Bump absorbtion is excellent here as well, even deeper in the stroke repetitive high speed bumps are ironed out very well and there is no spiking or harshness. The shock ramps up nicely at the end of the stroke as well (non progression boost) and honestly I wasn't able to really tell any difference in the shock ramp up at the end of the stroke between the PB and non PB shocks although they were on different bikes and were of different sizes.

Reliability:

The shock that I currently have on the Spartan has been perfectly reliable for the past year of riding. Not a weep of oil or anything at all, excellent. The 10.5 shock I had on the Wilson did manage to get a bunch of air into the damper oil after a month through the IFP. I suspect this is because I did not check the Piggyback pressure right away after receiving it, allowing the pressure to be too low therefore causing air to get into the system. After an easy bleed of the shock and ensuring it was at the correct pressure it did not have any further issues for the next 6 months that I had it on the bike.

Quirks that you may or may not like:

Due to the design of the seal head the bushing for the rebound shaft is in between the dust wiper and the oil seal. This means that there is no provision for a hydraulic top out circuit in the shock. The main seal is molded such that it seals the shaft, and then has a larger diameter ring that sticks up a few millimeters that allows for the rebound piston holder to come into soft contact. You will notice a thud or clunk as this happens and this is normal operation. Some people may not like it but I really don't notice it at all, the performance of the shock really makes it easy to get past this. The knobs are also somewhat sharp, that being said so are the ones on the DVO jade I just got, really once you find a good setting you won't end up turning them again.

Serviceability:

Really easy to service the shock, basic tools required to change the oil are a 27mm or 1 1/16 deep 6pt socket, 2.5mm allen key, vice with soft jaws and scale, or calipers to measure the IFP depth. IFP depths do not seem to be easy to find on the internet but are very easy to calculate based on the shock size.

Posted: Oct 29, 2018 at 1:02 Quote
Is it correct, that it only uses a bumper for bottom out or does it use s hydraulic solution?
If it is only a bumper shortening travel should be an easy task by only usinga spacer, no?

Posted: Oct 29, 2018 at 1:14 Quote
naturaltalent wrote:
A couple people have asked, so I will do a small review on the Moto C2R.

rider weight: 150lbs

Settings:
Spartan: 350lb/inch spring
rebound: There are so many clicks of adjustment, I'm usually somewhere in the middle of the range, I don't have a click count as the shock is apart for service currently.
Compression: I have been running 5 clicks of low speed compression and 3 clicks of high speed compression

I currently have one on a Devinci Spartan Carbon (non PB 8.5x2.5) and had one on my older style Wilson Carbon (PB 10.5x3.5), both are fairly progressive frames so they work quite well with coil shocks, different bikes will be a different story. I will break this review into small chunks focusing on certain aspects of the shock.

Beginning stroke:

Probably the most notable thing about this shock is how little force is required to activate it. You can push down on the saddle of your bike with one finger and it will start to move. The skf seals in the seal head are to attribute to this as well as the very light amount of squeeze on the o-ring for the IFP. This shock simply erases small chatter in the beginning of the stroke. As a example of how little friction is present in this shock system and how good the bump absorbtion is, I was running a 200lb/inch spring on the Wilson on the stock vivid r2c, I had to bump up to 250 lbs spring with the moto C2R when I put it on the Wilson. The shock felt even softer with the 250 lbs spring on the wilson than the vivid with the 200 lbs spring. Seriously, there were many times where I thought I had a flat tire, but it was just the shock working so well.

The rest of the stroke:

Bump absorbtion is excellent here as well, even deeper in the stroke repetitive high speed bumps are ironed out very well and there is no spiking or harshness. The shock ramps up nicely at the end of the stroke as well (non progression boost) and honestly I wasn't able to really tell any difference in the shock ramp up at the end of the stroke between the PB and non PB shocks although they were on different bikes and were of different sizes.

Reliability:

The shock that I currently have on the Spartan has been perfectly reliable for the past year of riding. Not a weep of oil or anything at all, excellent. The 10.5 shock I had on the Wilson did manage to get a bunch of air into the damper oil after a month through the IFP. I suspect this is because I did not check the Piggyback pressure right away after receiving it, allowing the pressure to be too low therefore causing air to get into the system. After an easy bleed of the shock and ensuring it was at the correct pressure it did not have any further issues for the next 6 months that I had it on the bike.

Quirks that you may or may not like:

Due to the design of the seal head the bushing for the rebound shaft is in between the dust wiper and the oil seal. This means that there is no provision for a hydraulic top out circuit in the shock. The main seal is molded such that it seals the shaft, and then has a larger diameter ring that sticks up a few millimeters that allows for the rebound piston holder to come into soft contact. You will notice a thud or clunk as this happens and this is normal operation. Some people may not like it but I really don't notice it at all, the performance of the shock really makes it easy to get past this. The knobs are also somewhat sharp, that being said so are the ones on the DVO jade I just got, really once you find a good setting you won't end up turning them again.

Serviceability:

Really easy to service the shock, basic tools required to change the oil are a 27mm or 1 1/16 deep 6pt socket, 2.5mm allen key, vice with soft jaws and scale, or calipers to measure the IFP depth. IFP depths do not seem to be easy to find on the internet but are very easy to calculate based on the shock size.

Referring to service: where did you get the seals? Directly from skf? What is the data from the seals and how much did they cost?

Posted: Oct 29, 2018 at 20:58 Quote
Yes, there is no hydraulic bottom out or top out in this shock. Indeed, very easy to fit a spacer to change the travel of the shock, I did this to a 8.75x2.75 to make it an 8.5x2.5, very easy. I just reused the existing seals that the shock had. No idea where to source the oil seal from, that is likely a proprietary part. The dust wiper is likely a standard dimension and could probably be found from an industrial supplier. With a lathe it would be quite easy to machine a new seal head and use a different, standard seal for oil retention if one could not source the parts. Also interesting of note, the seal on the IFP is a FKM seal (the material its made from - fluoroelastomer, its brown), it seems to have lower stiction and friction than a standard NBR seal in dynamic applications, it makes the IFP move soo easliy. I am hoping to stick some FKM seals into an air fork to see what difference it makes in that application, potentially a cheap and really easy way to improve the sensitivity of an air spring, still won't match a coil but would be an improvement over stock.

pics of spacer for travel shortening:

moto c2r
moto c2r
moto c2r
moto c2r

Posted: Oct 30, 2018 at 0:14 Quote
What is the spacer, that green thing?

Posted: Oct 30, 2018 at 0:18 Quote
Is the top out very hard?
I have an x fusion vector hlr coil, which is a really good shock and has thishydraulic top out which is really nice. But I Am thinking about the moto because I know it has a great damping design and perhaps even less stiction.
THE BETTER IS THE ENEMY OF THE GOOD Damper ;-)

Someone made the experience if the moto is a significant improvement over the vector coil?

Posted: Oct 30, 2018 at 19:18 Quote
bansaiman wrote:
What is the spacer, that green thing?

Green piece is original oil seal and top out bumper. The spacer is the raw aluminum piece with the o ring on it between the green seal and the red piston seat.

Posted: Oct 30, 2018 at 22:05 Quote
And how do you like the shock in comparison to some of the new highend offerings?

Posted: Oct 30, 2018 at 22:07 Quote
2. What is that thin red plate above the raw spacer with the holes in it?

Posted: Feb 11, 2019 at 14:16 Quote
Red plate is there to limit topout. It is where the topout bumper rests.

Previous Page | Next Page

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.027618
Mobile Version of Website