Yeti Vs. Intense

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Posted: Jan 6, 2018 at 21:38 Quote
Hello everyone,
I have been looking at the new 2018 bikes recently, and have not found a vs. for the yeti sb5.5 and the intense carbine. They are very similar in my opinion and are both on my list for my next bike. Additionally I am looking at the yeti sb6c and the intense tracer. I am curious on your thoughts. I will mainly be using this for all around ridding. I race enduro, ride parks, and go on long trail rides. How does the infinity link compare to the new JS suspension?

Thanks for your input!

Posted: Jan 10, 2018 at 15:25 Quote
The Yeti is going to climb extremely well, it does fine on descents but the switch infinity can get overloaded and will essentially turn your bike into a hard-tail until you get to a less intense part of the trail. Picking good lines will help with that but not totally prevent it.

The Tracer is going to serve you a lot better going down, but your not gonna have the same climbing efficiency as the yeti's do. Alot of this will come down to how your riding the bike and how you pick your lines, But the JS tuned design isnt anything new, its a VPP (like what Santa Cruz uses) with a different name. All in all I really enjoyed my tracer. Depending on how often your hitting the bigger trails, id say go with the tracer because even though its not the greatest climber, your not going to have to worry about that shock getting overwhelmed when heading down.

Hope this helps man!

Posted: Jan 10, 2018 at 19:12 Quote
Yogi-T wrote:
The Yeti is going to climb extremely well, it does fine on descents but the switch infinity can get overloaded and will essentially turn your bike into a hard-tail until you get to a less intense part of the trail. Picking good lines will help with that but not totally prevent it.

The Tracer is going to serve you a lot better going down, but your not gonna have the same climbing efficiency as the yeti's do. Alot of this will come down to how your riding the bike and how you pick your lines, But the JS tuned design isnt anything new, its a VPP (like what Santa Cruz uses) with a different name. All in all I really enjoyed my tracer. Depending on how often your hitting the bigger trails, id say go with the tracer because even though its not the greatest climber, your not going to have to worry about that shock getting overwhelmed when heading down.

Hope this helps man!

Total BS, switch infinity is definitely not like riding a hardtail. On my demos it was plush, but the problem with demos is that the suspension is rarely setup right.

Right now I have a bronson and it took at least a month to get it right, not setup correctly the bike feels harsh.

Posted: Jan 11, 2018 at 7:45 Quote
Yogi-T wrote:
The Yeti is going to climb extremely well, it does fine on descents but the switch infinity can get overloaded and will essentially turn your bike into a hard-tail until you get to a less intense part of the trail. Picking good lines will help with that but not totally prevent it.

The Tracer is going to serve you a lot better going down, but your not gonna have the same climbing efficiency as the yeti's do. Alot of this will come down to how your riding the bike and how you pick your lines, But the JS tuned design isnt anything new, its a VPP (like what Santa Cruz uses) with a different name. All in all I really enjoyed my tracer. Depending on how often your hitting the bigger trails, id say go with the tracer because even though its not the greatest climber, your not going to have to worry about that shock getting overwhelmed when heading down.

Hope this helps man!

Overloaded and turned into a Hard tail??? Was the infinity switch maintained with the correct grease or did it run dry? The switch infinity was one of the best climbing platforms I've been on, never have I "over" loaded it going DH either when I was testing it in Whistler...

VPP is a proven design, pedaling in "open" shock mode can be better than other suspension platforms, although I did like the switch infinity better for climbing.

Posted: Jan 12, 2018 at 9:41 Quote
We need to qualify these comments because having had experience with both platforms, to me the differences are almost imperceptible.

If you ride one regularly for a season and then switch to the other, you'll probably notice a very slight difference, but I have come from spending better than a decade on four-bar systems and can tell you that BOTH VPP and Switch climb so well that there's no point in distinguishing between them. I did see the "packing up" of the switch system on descent but it's so minor that VPP's (also minor) issue with repeated square-edge hits is almost more of a concern. I found both suspensions to be harsher on descent than the popular four-bar designs, especially with the rear brake active. That said, it takes a ride or two to adjust to these differences and then you'll absolutely love either one.

Now - MAINTENANCE is where you need to focus, because both switch and switch infinity are complicated and have more (and more expensive) wear parts. With VPP, as long as you don't damage a link somehow, it's just grease and very common bearings. That's a substantial difference.

Posted: Jan 12, 2018 at 10:35 Quote
I think this is very much more a question of bike personality than of suspension platform. With it's shorter wheelbase and shorter 140mm of travel out back, the Yeti is probably a little more sporty and lively on the trail. I've ridden the 5.5 a few times, and although it's still more "crush" than "dance", it's still very responsive and strikes a nice balance between stability and agility. I actually own a Jeffsy with a 160mm fork (nearly identical geo) and I've got to say that I have a really hard time putting it out of its depth.

I haven't been on an '18 Carbine yet, but if it rides anything like the old version then it's not really happy unless you've got it pointed down a minefield of rocks at 30 mph. The reviews I've read on the '18 Carbine all suggest that it's a lazy climber, at best, so I think the idea of long rides would point you away from it. I know I certainly wouldn't want to ride more than about 20 miles on the previous version; no thank you.

If it were me, I'd go for the Yeti. It's a better all-rounder than the Carbine, and I personally love the balance 160/140 travel strikes between rear-end accuracy and front-end cushion. I know people whine about the complexity of Switch Infinity, but literally all you do to maintain it beyond a regular platform is shoot the stanchions with a hose and shoot grease in the ports every 100 hrs or so. Really not that bad. None of my buddies that ride Yeti have ever had any problems; they're riding 2500 mile seasons and their stanchions still look new.

Posted: Jan 13, 2018 at 7:31 Quote
Absolutely agree on the Yeti! I've been owning a SB66c since 2016 and this is the best bike I've ever owned. The so-called harshness or stiffness of the rear end comes from the inherent IS design, which makes for a degressive suspension (i.e. the more it goes into its travel, the softer it is). So this is why many people are saying that Yetis are made for going fast. That said, once broken and after some tinkering on the suspension, you can get a nice linear feeling.

I have never ridden an Intense (although I would have liked and considered the Tracer before buying my Yeti) but I can testify that the Yeti suspension is highly competent, whether uphill or downhill.

If you do some "enduro" riding, the SB6 could be a nice bet too: it's an awesome "do-it-all" bike that can be setup light with the right parts (around 27.5-28 lb).

Posted: Feb 28, 2020 at 20:13 Quote
I just bought a 2018 Carbine and was concerned it might be a little more travel than I need and difficult to throw around. It's actually been great, very fun popping off stuff and also stable. And the suspension feels awesome. It's got an X2 and Fox 36 grip2 suspension so that's gotta help. I bought it used here on pinkbike. It's also got i9 hyda hubs and grade 300rims so it's pretty dialed. But it's a really good all arounder. I wanted the primer but couldn't pass up the deal and I'm glad I'm on the Carbine. Stiff frame too

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