The new Troy 29er is Amazing!

PB Forum :: Devinci
The new Troy 29er is Amazing!
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Posted: Nov 21, 2019 at 5:24 Quote
DMal wrote:
Yeah, I think it depends what you’re after. I have no doubt that the bike is a bit more comfortable to climb on with the 150 fork. But with the 160 or 170 and the seat slammed forward, I don’t notice the front end being light. The fact that I’m a bit more stretched out at 5’8” riding a large probably helps.

I hear ya, all about compromises and what your priority is. I wasn't sure if I'd stick with 150 or bump it up to 160 after trying it. But I wasn't disappointed with its downhill abilities with it at 150, so I ended up leaving it.

Posted: Nov 21, 2019 at 5:40 Quote
travismurphynb wrote:
Guys, this seems like a solid thread on the Troy 29er. I need some advice -- I'm currently on a 2018 Trance advanced (27.5) and I'm considering a change. My main gripes with the trance is the fox 34 in the front (too flexy, definitely a limiting feature of the build) and Id love to be slacker in HA by at least 1 degree (currently 67). I do love riding the bike on the trails, and its a fun, poppy bike with a bigger volume spacer in the dpx2. It's fairly light and capable, but again I'm just looking for a change.

I was considering the Django, but the build kits aren't burly enough for me to sign on with that bike as a one off bike. I'd love the Norco Optic with its burly build kit (essentially enduro spec) but my local shop doesn't sell that brand and I'm pretty partial to sticking with the guy since he gives out wicked deals and lots of local support. Needless to say, I like the 2020 Carbon 29 or the carbon/alu build for the troy, but I'm worried it'll be 'too much bike' for regular trail riding. We dont have big mountains here, but we do have lots of rock and downhill tech, but no massive downhills in North Bay, Ontario. I ride a few parks a year (blue mountain, bromont, camp fortune, killington, etc) but it really makes up less than 5% of total ride time, so i cant pick a bike specific for that.

Do you think the 29er troy would be too much?

If you do, what bike would you suggest? I can essentially pick from Specialized, Santa Cruz, Devinci, Giant, Kona and Pivot (a less likely option).

Looking for something no bigger than 150mm front, roughly 130-140 rear travel with burly level components (pike, lyric, 36, quad piston brakes, decent drivetrain, etc) that pedals well on the regular trails but remains capable at a park or some tech downhill when it comes time (probably the same as tons of people).

I'm in Ontario too and own both a new Django and a Troy 29. I ride the Django pretty much exclusively around here. The Troy is a bit much for around here to be honest. It's for sure doable, just not as fast or fun IMO. My Troy is nearly 5 lbs heavier than my Django so I'm sure that has something to do with it, but it just seems more sluggish and more of a chore to pedal round local trails than the Django. The Troy really shines when riding bigger terrain though, the more winch up to bomb down type stuff that you get out west and in Quebec. If 95% of your riding is local and you want only 1 bike, then I'd go with a Django with a burlier build (140mm Fox 36/Lyric, durable wheels/tires, etc). This type of build would still be doable when you visit the DH parks you mentioned. Although not as well suited for this stuff as a Troy or Spartan would be, you could still do it. And then you also have pretty much the perfect bike for what you ride most. You could also have a light(ish) wheelset for local duties, and a DH wheelset for park days to make it work better for both.

Posted: Nov 21, 2019 at 5:59 Quote
freerider11 wrote:
DMal wrote:
Yeah, I think it depends what you’re after. I have no doubt that the bike is a bit more comfortable to climb on with the 150 fork. But with the 160 or 170 and the seat slammed forward, I don’t notice the front end being light. The fact that I’m a bit more stretched out at 5’8” riding a large probably helps.

I hear ya, all about compromises and what your priority is. I wasn't sure if I'd stick with 150 or bump it up to 160 after trying it. But I wasn't disappointed with its downhill abilities with it at 150, so I ended up leaving it.

Mine is the GX Ltd so it came at 160. It was certainly no slouch on the way down in that configuration. But I got the bike to be an enduro race bike of sorts.

On paper, I was looking for the Spartan 29, but after demoing both the Spartan and Troy, the Troy felt more responsive and intuitive, and I felt like I would be faster on it and have fun for most of the riding I do. Bumping the fork up to 170 just gives it a touch more stability when the speed picks up or when it gets steeper, if that’s what you’re looking for.

But part of it could also be that I sized up. I had demoed the medium and it felt quite balanced. But I bought the large and sometimes felt like I was being pulled onto the bars a bit more than I wanted, especially down steeper janky stuff. Getting that extra half degree of head angle seems to help, and the longer fork also slightly reduces the reach. The large with long fork feels great now for me at 5’8”. Reach is at probably 455ish, in line with many modern mediums.

Posted: Nov 21, 2019 at 6:38 Quote
Interesting about your thoughts on the Troy vs Spartan. I've been toying with the idea of replacing both my Wilson and Troy with a Spartan. I rarely ride the Wilson anymore but still want something that's well suited for DH days when needed. A Spartan can be built up to identical weight as a Troy, and similar geo (it actually has a steeper seat tube angle) so I had envisioned it climbing almost as well as the Troy, just with 20mm more travel. My worry is what you mention though, that I will lose the responsiveness that I enjoy with the Troy 29. I really do love how the Troy rides so it's a difficult decision.

Posted: Nov 22, 2019 at 10:30 Quote
freerider11 wrote:
Interesting about your thoughts on the Troy vs Spartan. I've been toying with the idea of replacing both my Wilson and Troy with a Spartan. I rarely ride the Wilson anymore but still want something that's well suited for DH days when needed. A Spartan can be built up to identical weight as a Troy, and similar geo (it actually has a steeper seat tube angle) so I had envisioned it climbing almost as well as the Troy, just with 20mm more travel. My worry is what you mention though, that I will lose the responsiveness that I enjoy with the Troy 29. I really do love how the Troy rides so it's a difficult decision.

Yeah, that's exactly it. The Spartan felt a bit numb to me, where some of my inputs were lost in the travel. It felt quiet and stable, but not as fun. When I demoed, I felt like the Troy encouraged a more active riding style, whereas the Spartan I felt like a bit of a passenger. But on really steep, fast, aggressive terrain, I have no doubt the Spartan would come alive.

I actually think the seat angle on the Troy works well with its shorter travel. Because it doesn't sag as much as the Spartan, it stays steep enough at its ride height. A 165 mm travel bike likely needs a steeper static seat angle to account for sag.

Also, my other bike is a Chromag Rootdown, which has a very steep seat angle. I'm a bit on the fence about it. It hurts my knees at times. There's something to be said for being a bit more stretched out.

Posted: Nov 22, 2019 at 10:51 Quote
DMal wrote:
Yeah, that's exactly it. The Spartan felt a bit numb to me, where some of my inputs were lost in the travel. It felt quiet and stable, but not as fun. When I demoed, I felt like the Troy encouraged a more active riding style, whereas the Spartan I felt like a bit of a passenger. But on really steep, fast, aggressive terrain, I have no doubt the Spartan would come alive.

I actually think the seat angle on the Troy works well with its shorter travel. Because it doesn't sag as much as the Spartan, it stays steep enough at its ride height. A 165 mm travel bike likely needs a steeper static seat angle to account for sag.

Also, my other bike is a Chromag Rootdown, which has a very steep seat angle. I'm a bit on the fence about it. It hurts my knees at times. There's something to be said for being a bit more stretched out.

You raise a couple of important points:

Seat-tube angle and suspension travel are related. More suspension means more sag when your weight is rearward on climbs, so long-travel bikes need to start steeper to avoid becoming too slack when this happens. A steep seat-tube angle on a hardtail stays steep, so it's effectively a lot steeper than the same angle on a bike with plenty of suspension. The Rootdown starts steep, stays steep, and is even steeper than the 76° suggests because the actual angle (rather than the effective angle) is also steep. Did I mention it's steep? Smile

Regarding travel: Broadly speaking, geometry is what determines the terrain a bike can get down and travel determines the speed limit. A crazy-slack bike will get you down the steepest trails, but will feel like holding onto a jackhammer at high speed. Conversely, a bike with loads of travel will smooth out the trail as you smash through it at high speed, but will be a squishy mess if you're on terrain that would be more appropriate for a trials bike.

Your trails and your riding style will determine the right balance of geometry and travel. As you said, "big" bikes with lots of travel aren't necessarily more able to handle more challenging terrain - just look at what trials riders can do! - and they need lots of speed to become the right tool for the job.

Posted: Nov 22, 2019 at 10:54 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
travismurphynb wrote:
Do you think the 29er troy would be too much?

It pedals well and the geometry works well for climbing, so there's little detriment to going "up" a class with the Troy. The seat-tube angle could be steeper, so don't be afraid to size up and slam the saddle forward.

I'm on my third Troy, I had the 27.5 Troy 2015, 2018 and currently 2019 29er. I think the 29er actually climbs better and handles better than all previous. However i'm 6'2" and the 27.5 XL was a touch cramped, the 29er XL fits me much better. I ride it on greens, blues, blacks, it's my every day bike.

Posted: Nov 29, 2019 at 6:54 Quote
Let's talk tires for a second...
I've got a 2019 ltd with the raceface arc 35 inner rims and i'm struggling to think of good options outside of maxxis WT.
so far my usual michelin wild am 2.35 rear tire was very squared off to the point the side knobs were pretty much engaged just while rolling. Outback I'm currently using a bontrager se5 2.3. I've found bontrager tires to be very round on 28-30mm inner rims so I figured it would have a more traditional profile on the 35's and it does although the carcass is a bit more exposed (bonus it's measuring 2.4).... So now I'm looking to try something different upfront I'm currently on a 2.4 dhr wt. I've tried and liked the assegai but the rolling resistance is hard to swallow in Ontario. Does anyone have any NON Maxxis tires (magic mary, verdict, wild enduro) they've run on these wide ass rims that have worked out well?

Posted: Nov 29, 2019 at 7:01 Quote
lunker8 wrote:
Let's talk tires for a second...
I've got a 2019 ltd with the raceface arc 35 inner rims and i'm struggling to think of good options outside of maxxis WT.
so far my usual michelin wild am 2.35 rear tire was very squared off to the point the side knobs were pretty much engaged just while rolling. Outback I'm currently using a bontrager se5 2.3. I've found bontrager tires to be very round on 28-30mm inner rims so I figured it would have a more traditional profile on the 35's and it does although the carcass is a bit more exposed (bonus it's measuring 2.4).... So now I'm looking to try something different upfront I'm currently on a 2.4 dhr wt. I've tried and liked the assegai but the rolling resistance is hard to swallow in Ontario. Does anyone have any NON Maxxis tires (magic mary, verdict, wild enduro) they've run on these wide ass rims that have worked out well?

I've got 34mm inner width carbon rims on my Troy. IMO 2.35 Schwalbe's (which generally run large) have a good profile on this width of rim. On the front I run either a Magic Mary or a Hans Dampf (new style). On the rear I run either a Hans Dampf or a Rock Razor. Been really happy with a combination of these tire options for pretty much any conditions I've encountered in my travels with this bike.

Posted: Nov 29, 2019 at 13:11 Quote
lunker8 wrote:
[ ... ] 35 inner rims [ ... ] NON Maxxis tires (magic mary, verdict, wild enduro) they've run on these wide ass rims that have worked out well?

I'm on 36 mm rims with 2.6" tires, some of which are overly flattened, so it's not surprising your 2.3" - 2.4" tires are having issues.

• By far the most wrapped treads I've used are the Kenda Hellkat and Nevegal2. Slightly oversized, so watch your frame clearance. Been happy with them.
• Specialized Purgatory 2.6" are undersized. Acceptable wrap. GRID casing is fragile.
• IRC's Tanken has good wrap and measures true to size.
• Vittoria's Martello is far too flattened for use on the front. Marginally acceptable on the rear.
• WTB's Convict 2.5" works fairly well. The older generation "Light" casing without Slash Guard sidewalls is too fragile.

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