*Help* wheelie tyre pressure and type

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*Help* wheelie tyre pressure and type
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Posted: Aug 4, 2018 at 10:43 Quote
I'm a beginner rider and am trying to wheelie. However when I'm trying this the front keeps coming down and is hard to get up to the balance point. I've caught the balance point once or twice but the next time I come to try I fall short and the wheel comes back down. Im trying to not make extra work for myself so id like to know what the optimal pressure is for my tyres and what type I should use (flater or more knobbly). My tyres are the standard kenda 29 tyres that come on the carrera sulcata. Thanks in advance

Posted: Aug 7, 2018 at 21:31 Quote
Try around 25psi & flat, grassy area with no bumps. Easier gearing, put the power down while shifting your weight back as you pull up on the bars. To ride it, you keep the balance point by putting down more or less power while balancing your weight. Just keep practicing, that soft grass is added benefit if you mess up.

Posted: May 8, 2019 at 11:21 Quote
Stigisjosh wrote:
I'm a beginner rider and am trying to wheelie. However when I'm trying this the front keeps coming down and is hard to get up to the balance point. I've caught the balance point once or twice but the next time I come to try I fall short and the wheel comes back down. Im trying to not make extra work for myself so id like to know what the optimal pressure is for my tyres and what type I should use (flater or more knobbly). My tyres are the standard kenda 29 tyres that come on the carrera sulcata. Thanks in advance

You just need to keep working at it. Nothings wrong with your bike. I know that it's easy to blame it on your bike but it isn't your bike. I've ridden wheelies on a beach cruiser. You've just got to put in the work and practice.

Posted: May 8, 2019 at 11:24 Quote
There's no tire pressure that will make much of a difference for your ability to wheelie ... but when I was practicing wheelies, I would drop my front pressure to single-digit PSI to make the landings softer!

Posted: May 8, 2019 at 11:31 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
There's no tire pressure that will make much of a difference for your ability to wheelie ... but when I was practicing wheelies, I would drop my front pressure to single-digit PSI to make the landings softer!

That's not the greatest idea as you can cause a lot of rim damage. Also, you have multiple feet of suspension travel in your arms, so you don't need any extra. If you do, you are doing something wrong

Posted: May 8, 2019 at 11:47 Quote
KeyScales wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
There's no tire pressure that will make much of a difference for your ability to wheelie ... but when I was practicing wheelies, I would drop my front pressure to single-digit PSI to make the landings softer!

That's not the greatest idea as you can cause a lot of rim damage. Also, you have multiple feet of suspension travel in your arms, so you don't need any extra. If you do, you are doing something wrong

Yes, actually it is the greatest idea. Ever. In the history of the world. Definitely in the top three, at least.

Keep the pressure high enough that you don't damage the rim. I think this is pretty obvious. For me, something around 7 - 9 psi was sufficient with a true 2.5" tire on 30 mm rim. I was practicing on neighbourhood streets and a in grassy park, not on trails. Again, I think it's pretty obvious I'm not suggesting to ride at 8 psi on normal trails just because someone wants to try an occasional wheelie.

Your logic of using the suspension in your arms also means we don't need suspension forks or frames. Even with a totally unnecessary suspension fork, go inflate your front tire to 60 psi and ride a trail. Tell me whether your arms and fork were sufficient or if the tire actually makes a difference.

Better yet, try doing fifty wheelies with your tire at normal trail pressure, then do fifty at 9 psi.

Posted: May 8, 2019 at 19:21 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
KeyScales wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
There's no tire pressure that will make much of a difference for your ability to wheelie ... but when I was practicing wheelies, I would drop my front pressure to single-digit PSI to make the landings softer!

That's not the greatest idea as you can cause a lot of rim damage. Also, you have multiple feet of suspension travel in your arms, so you don't need any extra. If you do, you are doing something wrong

Yes, actually it is the greatest idea. Ever. In the history of the world. Definitely in the top three, at least.

Keep the pressure high enough that you don't damage the rim. I think this is pretty obvious. For me, something around 7 - 9 psi was sufficient with a true 2.5" tire on 30 mm rim. I was practicing on neighbourhood streets and a in grassy park, not on trails. Again, I think it's pretty obvious I'm not suggesting to ride at 8 psi on normal trails just because someone wants to try an occasional wheelie.

Your logic of using the suspension in your arms also means we don't need suspension forks or frames. Even with a totally unnecessary suspension fork, go inflate your front tire to 60 psi and ride a trail. Tell me whether your arms and fork were sufficient or if the tire actually makes a difference.

Better yet, try doing fifty wheelies with your tire at normal trail pressure, then do fifty at 9 psi.

Dude chill out. All I'm saying is it is unnecessary to deflate your tire just to do wheelies. And for your information I have ridden a full rigid bike in Pisgah, so I know why suspension is so great.

Posted: May 8, 2019 at 19:48 Quote
KeyScales wrote:
Dude chill out. All I'm saying is it is unnecessary to deflate your tire just to do wheelies.

I completele agree. Not many things beyond food, water, and air are necessary, they just make life better. Things like a super soft front tire when you're learning wheelies and clumsily slapping the front wheel down a hundred times in an hour.

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