Brunei's First Bike Skills Park (Prototype Design)

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Brunei's First Bike Skills Park (Prototype Design)
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Posted: Aug 20, 2018 at 12:58 Quote
First time SketchUp user, making first attempt designing layout for the first ever proposed commercial Bike Skills Park in my country. So far about two weeks of on/off multiple hour sessions of 3D modelling has brought me to this latest iteration. Honestly, I'm only learning as I go with this whole thing, and have tried my best to incorporate the best reference photos that I have found on the internet of pumptracks, dirtjumps, etc. This is my mash-up of all those limited visual studies I've made, put into a virtual square-ish 1 hectar piece of flat real estate. It's my dream to get the project conceived all the way from designing to building, so I really want to get this right as much as possible. Screenshots shared below for feedbacks. Any comments are much appreciated.

Isometric front view of whole park.

Starting area for main pumptrack.

Starting ramp for dirtjump area.

Entrance/Exit Ticket Booth

Posted: Aug 20, 2018 at 21:13 Quote
Sorry for broken image urls. Fixed.

Posted: Aug 20, 2018 at 23:15 Quote
I'm far from a bike park expert, but I have to say, it looks like a Fun place to ride. Nice layout. Good luck with it.

Posted: Aug 21, 2018 at 2:32 Quote
Looks really good!
do you already know how you want to build it? concret / wood /soil oder asphalt?
do you have experience in building such jusmps and is there a customer base?

any way best of luck with that project

Posted: Aug 21, 2018 at 18:20 Quote
Luneec wrote:
Looks really good!
do you already know how you want to build it? concret / wood /soil oder asphalt?
do you have experience in building such jusmps and is there a customer base?

any way best of luck with that project


I plan to have it developed in phases. What you see there is the final state. So on initial soft opening, it will be all dirt, unless somehow an extraordinary amount of capital money lands on my lap. So yeah, sub-surface drainage work, then the dirt mounds initially, shaped to be ride-ready, then in the future ultimately lay on some sweet asphalt, then add on manicured lawn grass to complete the green park aesthetics. The dirtjump section would still maintain pure dirt, except maybe for the main starting ramp, which I might go for some fortification using industrial soil additive process, once subsequent capital is generated or gained later on in the life of the park.

I have only built trails and jumps in the woods both on my own and with my buddies. I wish I could attend workshops/seminars like the ones ran by PTBA (Professional Trail Building Association). But trailbuilding is my passion, and building two-wheeled related courses like a bike park hopefully is a natural profression for me. If not, then hopefully the Civil Engineer buddy of mine I brought on to my team will supplement my construction management/experience gaps.

As far as customer base, hypothetically the market potential and demand is definitely there, and nobody is dominating yet to tap into this local market share. The nearest bike park (or even an existing purpose-build pumptrack/dirtjump) is a whole ocean away in the nearest country. Market share aside, it still stands that this project was born out of strong collective desire to create a platform for future athletes and and venue budding enthusiasts that is accessible to the widest range of age and skill as possible. Sustainability and profitability is just a secondary but essential requirement to let the park grow and elevate in its development and progression.

Posted: Aug 21, 2018 at 18:33 Quote
Thought I'd also share this study I made on pumptrack geometries in order for me to put this knowledge to practical use during construction phase later on. Also used this as template to design another municipal pumptrack layout for a separate project being led by another bmx-er friend of mine. I haven't built pumptracks professionally, so are these dimensions applicable in reality? I'm aware of the 1:10 ratio of height to length standard for rollers, but I used a variation of that at 1.5:10. Hopefully that is still nicely pumpable, right?


Posted: Aug 21, 2018 at 18:45 Quote
descorpus wrote:
Thought I'd also share this study I made on pumptrack geometries in order for me to put this knowledge to practical use during construction phase later on. Also used this as template to design another municipal pumptrack layout for a separate project being led by another bmx-er friend of mine. I haven't built pumptracks professionally, so are these dimensions applicable in reality? I'm aware of the 1:10 ratio of height to length standard for rollers, but I used a variation of that at 1.5:10. Hopefully that is still nicely pumpable, right?


Personally I go by feel and if the feature doesn't feel right then I adjust accordingly. This may not be practical for professional, consistent building but you learn as you build.

As for the photo you referenced, the rollers look nice and fairly balanced to me, though consider that pump tracks are more likely to be ridden on 26" DJ bikes than 27.5".

Posted: Aug 21, 2018 at 18:54 Quote
vydra wrote:
As for the photo you referenced, the rollers look nice and fairly balanced to me, though consider that pump tracks are more likely to be ridden on 26" DJ bikes than 27.5".

Good point, I should use dirtjump bikes for reference in the schematic instead of the specialized enduro. Thanks. ....Now, what's a sweet DJ bike to model after.. ?

Posted: Aug 21, 2018 at 19:10 Quote
descorpus wrote:
Good point, I should use dirtjump bikes for reference in the schematic instead of the specialized enduro. Thanks. ....Now, what's a sweet DJ bike to model after.. ?

There's plenty out there but the Specialized P.3 should work just fine to model after.

Posted: Aug 21, 2018 at 20:58 Quote
Here's a more zoomed in view of the dirtjump lines. Concept is straight forward but with variety in skill levels. Nothing intricate or elaborately criss-crossing lines. Feedbacks from experienced builders/riders much appreciated.


Posted: Aug 22, 2018 at 1:36 Quote
I think not criss-crossing lines in a skillspark is very important to minimize colissions. riders are focusing on their skills not otehr riders.

If you start out with soil you need to think about the maintnance you need. think about your buildcrew capacity can they keep up with wear? (our local trail is starting to struggle with that). When we steped up from building trails for us and our freinds to building official trails for the public some issues with wear popped up we never experienced before.

please dont take my comments as negative, i really love the project and just wnat to bring up any issues that might arise before hand to prevent them from becomeing actual issues.

Posted: Aug 22, 2018 at 2:44 Quote
Luneec wrote:
I think not criss-crossing lines in a skillspark is very important to minimize colissions. riders are focusing on their skills not otehr riders.

If you start out with soil you need to think about the maintnance you need. think about your buildcrew capacity can they keep up with wear? (our local trail is starting to struggle with that). When we steped up from building trails for us and our freinds to building official trails for the public some issues with wear popped up we never experienced before.

please dont take my comments as negative, i really love the project and just wnat to bring up any issues that might arise before hand to prevent them from becomeing actual issues.

That's excellent insight Luneec, thanks so much. This vital consideration in the running of operations needs to be factored into the scope of employment for park maintenance crew and how big the crew requirement will need to be. This would be especially the case during initial stage of the completed park's life where all will be dirt (ie. no asphalt layering of pumptrack, no surface hardening additives for the dirtjump roll-in mound, no lawn grass covered areas).

Posted: Aug 22, 2018 at 3:01 Quote
and how about the monsoon. Brunei has a lot more precipitation than anywhere i have ever built so i have no idea how much erosion direkt rain can cause. xou migth want to think about some trees for shade and as a buffer for the percipitation. also it will provide free shade during operation hours for the customers. the leaves falling will cause a bit more work but you will have to run a broom over the tracke frequently anyway so that wont be too much of an issue.

Posted: Aug 22, 2018 at 8:06 Quote
Luneec wrote:
and how about the monsoon. Brunei has a lot more precipitation than anywhere i have ever built so i have no idea how much erosion direkt rain can cause. xou migth want to think about some trees for shade and as a buffer for the percipitation. also it will provide free shade during operation hours for the customers. the leaves falling will cause a bit more work but you will have to run a broom over the tracke frequently anyway so that wont be too much of an issue.

That is in the fore-front of our minds. Like they always say, drainage is life. In an ideal scenario in this specific part of the world, everything would preferably be housed indoor in a big warehouse. But project constraints had to dictate otherwise, so hopefully we'll be industrious enough to implement all the best practices in managing erosion effects of precipitation here in the tropical equator. It has to be a strategized 'preventive, protective and corrective' approach considering the significance of the foreseen issue; would this suffice:

- Regular maintenance with varyingly scheduled resurfacing/inspection/repairing according to monsoon seasons

- Soil composition selection for course building material that caters for maximum erosion resistance (ie. loam with extra clay?)

- Grass planting for non-ridden surfaces/slopes to strengthen and reduce erosion (more for pumptrack tham dirtjump course)

- Tree growing/transplanting at stratrgic spot as buffer from precipitation (as suggested by Luneec)

- Future permanent hard-surfacing (ie. asphalt paving) for pumptracks

- Functioning subsurface drainage system for flushing away stormwater, with maintenance scheduling to clear out any blockages

- Temporary closing off of park (or dirt based sections) during heavy significantly wet spells

- Canvas/Tarpoline covering of dirtjump lips for protection from rain erosion

- Grade the foundation of the dirtjump area ro slightly slope to one side to aid in surface water runoff

- Watering of dirt feature surfaces during dry days

- During rain itself, packing/spot repair sessions at high usage parts of the course

- Sweeping off loosened surface soil material due to riding; before it rains and becomes wet (and sets) and alters the original geometries of the features


....anything else to add? Any exerienced builder's advice is very much welcome on this very matter.

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