Fat bikes are a thing I guess.

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Fat bikes are a thing I guess.
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Posted: Jan 9, 2019 at 18:12 Quote
I been riding and racing my rigid fatty full time year round for 8 years before that I was on a yeti & a Rocky Mt. Fatty's are great on everything. Suspension on fatty is not recommended...especially in snow! For snow I take my worn tires from season and make my own studded tires with machine screws.. I leave them out 1/4 inch. Slow as hell. But, I never have to walk the frozen slop. By the time the winter is done my studs are worn down enough to be rolling smoother on the roads that connect the trails. By the time I'm laying down a few road rides on my fatty, the studs are flat weights in my tires. Then when everything thaws I take the heavy tires off and put on my summer tires.... It feels so godamn light in comparison I feel like I'm rolling with a motor on my bike.
Go tubeless and dial in your psi for ur suspension. You can hammer anything anywhere. I've taken mine all over the country and have never been bummed I didn't have sumthin else. You'll take more of a beating on super gnarly downhills.... I like beatings. However, there are those times when ur chasing ur buddies down Rocky as f--k Mountains for 6 day's when.... you'll be a lil bummed ur not on full squish.... rarely.

Posted: Jan 10, 2019 at 6:41 Quote
wowbagger wrote:
Gmoneyog1 wrote:
wowbagger wrote:
what's everyone's experiences with/thoughts on thru-axles? how much of a difference do they make stiffness-wise?
I don't think that I'll be giving it too much of a spanking but if QRs are noticeably flexy then I'd rather not have them..
Thru axles are the future. People will never go back to qr. It is much stiffer than qr, nicer looking and such.

yeah I get what they do on paper, I wanted to know if anyone has experience with both systems and can compare what the real life difference is.
The fat bike for me would rather be for more relaxed trailriding with my dogs - I wouldn't be giving it full beans (often) but if the difference is well noticeable then I'd steer clear (heh) of QRs

I have a 170 mm QR bike and 197 TA. I don't notice a world of difference when it comes to riding, but anectdotally, TA's don't seem to have the issues with blowing out hubs that QRs do. I guess it has to do with flexing and bearing wear that comes with the less substantial axel.

The vast majority of fat bikes are 197 TA these days and that choice will give you greater number of wheel and hub options. I have a couple 190 hubs and they can easily go on a 197 frame if you use spacers.

The only real advantage I can see to QR is if you need to frequently remove your wheels to transport or store the bike. If that isn't a consideration, I wouldn't really bother with QR.

......all that said, in regards to the OP, fat bikes are a lot of fun and open up many riding opportunities that might that might go unused with a conventional MTB. I ride mine in mud, snow and sand (something we have a lot of where I live) and there is a certain beauty in the simplicity of a fat bike. They aren't as ponderous as you would imagine.

Posted: Jan 12, 2019 at 18:48 Quote
wowbagger wrote:
what's everyone's experiences with/thoughts on thru-axles? how much of a difference do they make stiffness-wise?
I don't think that I'll be giving it too much of a spanking but if QRs are noticeably flexy then I'd rather not have them..

My first fatbike had QR axles front and rear and they’ve caused me no issues but I like thru axles better. Thru axles are much easier to use when removing and replacing your wheels when the bike is hanging in a stand.

Posted: Jan 13, 2019 at 16:15 Quote
wowbagger wrote:
Gmoneyog1 wrote:
wowbagger wrote:
what's everyone's experiences with/thoughts on thru-axles? how much of a difference do they make stiffness-wise?
I don't think that I'll be giving it too much of a spanking but if QRs are noticeably flexy then I'd rather not have them..
Thru axles are the future. People will never go back to qr. It is much stiffer than qr, nicer looking and such.

yeah I get what they do on paper, I wanted to know if anyone has experience with both systems and can compare what the real life difference is.
The fat bike for me would rather be for more relaxed trailriding with my dogs - I wouldn't be giving it full beans (often) but if the difference is well noticeable then I'd steer clear (heh) of QRs

I don't notice much, although it gives me a bit of a confidence boost knowing my wheel is more secure.

Posted: Feb 14, 2019 at 3:29 Quote
I was late to the party about fat bikes. I thought they were super dumb. But mostly because the crowd I associated with hated on them (shame on me for following the herd). Then I moved back to the land of winter and had no other choice. Now I realize I can ride over whatever I want wherever I want. Meaning I don’t need some tracked out smooth trail to have a great time. I can rip pine needles, giant roots, bumpy boulders and chunky ice all with a smile on my face. It is pretty awesome but yes it is different and you have to adjust to how a fat bike handles, learn how to set it up properly and if you are riding in winter learn how to dress and keep your water and snacks unfrozen for the best time ever. I haven’t had to change a flat yet, but I can’t imagine it being too crazy. *Also I imagined I’d be able to blast through deep snow and this is just not so. So keep that in mind before planning any crazy winter epic expeditions. Think snowmobile trails. Nordic trails. Trails people have packed down hiking or skinning. If you have enough gravity you will get through deeper stuff but remember the fat bike handles differently!

Posted: Feb 21, 2019 at 10:43 Quote
I really like fatbike riding. I have all kinds of bike classes at my disposal. Maybe not the best only-bike. Not only in Winter/Snow. It is perfect for rocky tracks like here in Spain. It motivates not to ride faster, but to take stranger lines.


Can recommend to anybody who thinks he gets backpain, sore hands or headache from Enduro riding.

But you definitly have to ride tubeless.
So far not one flat with the JumboJims (but two broken carbon rims :-( )

Posted: Feb 23, 2019 at 9:17 Quote
SUPER FUN IN THE WINTER. Death trap in the summer - and barfo-sucko slow.

Come summer you will quickly realize they don't turn well and lack the traction compared to your summer bike.
The fat wheels and tires are just too heavy to roll fast, too heavy to turn quickly, and float too much when you need tires to bite. Try to go as fast on a fat bike in summer compared to your summer bike and it will end badly!

Posted: Feb 24, 2019 at 1:11 Quote
BCMarc wrote:
SUPER FUN IN THE WINTER. Death trap in the summer - and barfo-sucko slow.

Come summer you will quickly realize they don't turn well and lack the traction compared to your summer bike.
The fat wheels and tires are just too heavy to roll fast, too heavy to turn quickly, and float too much when you need tires to bite. Try to go as fast on a fat bike in summer compared to your summer bike and it will end badly!

Depends on whether you leave the paved bike path or not. I love how well my Fatbike works out in the river bed, floating me over silt and sand washes and allowing me to ride over large cobbles. It does these things much better than my full suspension bikes. But yeah, try to go fast on a hard surface where traction isn’t an issue and the fat tires roll slower. Still, they aren’t as bad as you’d think if you air them up.

Posted: Feb 25, 2019 at 13:49 Quote
AWESOME, Have tried All Genres of Cycling, Love going the Beach and in the Sand Dunes, It never snows much Here, Great Exercise, Defo Better for making it 2x11, as the Granny Gear helps no end! LOVE Mine! P.S, Great to Ride after a few Beers, as a Lot more stable LOL : )))

Posted: Mar 24, 2019 at 5:28 Quote
That-Alaska-Guy wrote:
BCMarc wrote:
SUPER FUN IN THE WINTER. Death trap in the summer - and barfo-sucko slow.

Come summer you will quickly realize they don't turn well and lack the traction compared to your summer bike.
The fat wheels and tires are just too heavy to roll fast, too heavy to turn quickly, and float too much when you need tires to bite. Try to go as fast on a fat bike in summer compared to your summer bike and it will end badly!

Depends on whether you leave the paved bike path or not. I love how well my Fatbike works out in the river bed, floating me over silt and sand washes and allowing me to ride over large cobbles. It does these things much better than my full suspension bikes. But yeah, try to go fast on a hard surface where traction isn’t an issue and the fat tires roll slower. Still, they aren’t as bad as you’d think if you air them up.

I feel the same way. Fat tires have a place and purpose. If I lived somewhere that left me less climatically challenged, I'd say that yeah, they are unnecessarily ponderous and slow. But I don't and we only have a couple of solid months where everything isn't either mud, ice or snow (often a combination of all three). They also work well for beach riding if you have that as an opportunity.

Fat tires are often the only difference between riding or staying home around here. When my skinny tire riding friends are sitting on ass because they don't the appropriate tools to have fun, I'm outside doing my thing.

For anyone that skis, the analogy I use with my non-fatty friends is that it's like using rockered fat skis. Not the best way to get down the hill on boiler plate, but definitely will get the job done and absolutely worth the inconvenience when the conditions are right. If you have to have a quiver of one, they are a good option to consider.

Posted: Apr 2, 2019 at 6:30 Quote
Fat bikes are lots of fun and they will extend your season but they are slow. If you ride in a group you don't want to be the only one on a fat bike unless you are in great shape.
They are also very trail friendly barely leaving a track in the mud.
Plus you can bomb the roughest trail DH or make your on trail.

Posted: Apr 2, 2019 at 15:07 Quote
lightlives wrote:
I really like fatbike riding. I have all kinds of bike classes at my disposal. Maybe not the best only-bike. Not only in Winter/Snow. It is perfect for rocky tracks like here in Spain. It motivates not to ride faster, but to take stranger lines.


Can recommend to anybody who thinks he gets backpain, sore hands or headache from Enduro riding.

But you definitly have to ride tubeless.
So far not one flat with the JumboJims (but two broken carbon rims :-( )

Bloody nora that’s gotta be a f tank of a weapon to get moving

I should know having owned an instigator 2.0

Posted: Apr 2, 2019 at 20:42 Quote
I added a dropper to my FB I still need to go to tubliss but I will need new wheels.
I run studded tires all winter. Switching out tires on a FB is so easy they just fall off.
They also make a good beach cruiser and town bike for riding with your wife. Haha.
Check out the Diamond Back Olso with a Bluto.
How did you post a pic of your bike?

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