Tubeless is a Must

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Tubeless is a Must
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Posted: Oct 26, 2018 at 7:17 Quote
I can't imagine having a Fat bike and not running Tubeless. In order to utilize the low pressure benefit a tubeless setup is a must. Not to mention you shed like 3 lbs. in weight getting rid of the huge inner tubes on a Fat bike. I had my Farley 5 converted to tubeless before it even left the store. That is all.

Posted: Oct 27, 2018 at 0:02 Quote
I don’t have a fat bike. However when tubeless for fat bikes came out it make much easier to get shraider valves to convert my wheels. The bulk are priests so it was nice having an easy option and not have to do ghetto tubeless anymore

Posted: Oct 29, 2018 at 18:56 Quote
It depends on the rims and tires. I tried several methods and the Fatty Stripper latex strips finally helped to hold my floppy beads (Surly Nates on Marge Lites), but now only the front tire holds air as tubeless.

I may have to bite the pillow and try the split tube method with a 24x2.6 inner tube which allows one to use sealant and reduce pinch flats but keep the weight penalty Really Mad

Posted: Oct 30, 2018 at 20:07 Quote
I am successfully holding air in my tubeless setup which consists of 80mm wide wheel with cutouts, a cutout rim strip and using Zip system panel tape found at Lowes https://www.lowes.com/pd/ZIP-System-90-ft-Panel-System-Tape/50373856. I am running Surly Nates as well.

Posted: Nov 1, 2018 at 13:09 Quote
I'm still using tubes in my Moonlander, no problems running pressures as low as 2/3 psi F/R in winter and 4/5 psi F/R in summer. I've thought about converting to tubeless but I'm worried about it being a pain to set-up and reliability issues in -20C temperatures. Saving weight would be sweet, but if it ain't broken.....

Posted: Nov 5, 2018 at 4:48 Quote
https://www.reddit.com/r/fatbike/comments/9kcdez/tubeless_ready_to_tubelesshow_do_i_get_the_tire/e7azfkb


i use Soap on the bead, the valve core out, and a compressor with regulator @150psi. (Overnight with a tube in the tire helps form it and the rim strip.) I wrap a ratchet strap around the middle of the tire to push the bead onto the rim. Blast the air, release the strap, the bead snaps in around 20psi, release air to put in 4oz. of sealant in each tire, replace the valve core and inflate to 20psi again and spin em. Use more soap to identify leaky spots. An immediate ride once holding air is also essential to a good sealing. I’m a mechanic and have been setting up tubeless for 15 years and fat tires for about 5 and this works every time
for stubborn tires or winter riding i recommend the "ghetto" method.
split a 24"x2.4" ,presta (w/removable core) valve, down the non-valve side. seat the valve in rim hole (with rim tape of course) letting cut edges drape over the rim edge. follow above directions for the easiest tubeless fat ever.

Posted: Nov 6, 2018 at 22:26 Quote
superman-4 wrote:
I'm still using tubes in my Moonlander, no problems running pressures as low as 2/3 psi F/R in winter and 4/5 psi F/R in summer. I've thought about converting to tubeless but I'm worried about it being a pain to set-up and reliability issues in -20C temperatures. Saving weight would be sweet, but if it ain't broken.....


Reliability issues shouldn’t be a concern. I’ve had zero flats over 2 years except one time when I ripped up the side wall beyond repair , and even then it stayed pressured enough to make it my car. I couldn’t count the amount of tubes I’ve gone through prior. I used to run my tubes with sealant too
Single handedly the best possible upgrade you can do. It’s not that hard to set up either long as you have tubeless ready tires. Rims don’t attest too much

Posted: Nov 16, 2018 at 7:41 Quote
Staktup wrote:
It depends on the rims and tires. I tried several methods and the Fatty Stripper latex strips finally helped to hold my floppy beads (Surly Nates on Marge Lites), but now only the front tire holds air as tubeless.

I may have to bite the pillow and try the split tube method with a 24x2.6 inner tube which allows one to use sealant and reduce pinch flats but keep the weight penalty Really Mad
I have the split the tube method with the same tire rim combo 2 years no flats and only added air a few times in the 2 years it's worth it

Posted: Dec 8, 2018 at 10:33 Quote
My tire/rim combo is pretty damn loose fitting. I’d need a pair of tubes to get tubeless to work. Are the more current wheels better suited to tubeless or can you guys steer me towards a wheel set that will bead up reasonably well...since I have to buy another set anyway? I have a Rocky Mountain blizzard 10 and it has all the cheesy parts on it. I should mention that my last seasons tubes had a total of 21 patches on them.

Posted: Dec 9, 2018 at 8:08 Quote
Slapnutz wrote:
My tire/rim combo is pretty damn loose fitting. I’d need a pair of tubes to get tubeless to work. Are the more current wheels better suited to tubeless or can you guys steer me towards a wheel set that will bead up reasonably well...since I have to buy another set anyway? I have a Rocky Mountain blizzard 10 and it has all the cheesy parts on it. I should mention that my last seasons tubes had a total of 21 patches on them.

Sunringle mulefuts are tubeless ready and are pretty cheap, otherwise If budget isn’t a limiting factor then heads are the best

Posted: Dec 16, 2018 at 3:07 Quote
Staktup wrote:
It depends on the rims and tires. I tried several methods and the Fatty Stripper latex strips finally helped to hold my floppy beads (Surly Nates on Marge Lites), but now only the front tire holds air as tubeless

I may have to bite the pillow and try the split tube method with a 24x2.6 inner tube which allows one to use sealant and reduce pinch flats but keep the weight penalty Really Mad
I can weigh a 24” tube and 4 oz of sealant and I bet it will be less than a surly tube. Gorilla tape, fatty strips or clown shoe strips all add weight. Any tubeless setup fat is more about reducing wattage loss from the tube/tire, eliminates pinchflats and that amazing feel of fat tubeless!
http://https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/specials/tubeless-latex-butyl-tubes

Posted: Dec 28, 2018 at 14:07 Quote
superman-4 wrote:
I'm still using tubes in my Moonlander, no problems running pressures as low as 2/3 psi F/R in winter and 4/5 psi F/R in summer. I've thought about converting to tubeless but I'm worried about it being a pain to set-up and reliability issues in -20C temperatures. Saving weight would be sweet, but if it ain't broken.....

I’ve blown beads on my tires running super low psi and since I was running tubes, it was easy to remount the tire other than the delay and hassle. I was happy to not be dealing with a sticky, wet mess of sealant and worrying whether I could reseat the tire in those conditions. I blew the bead twice on a soft trail and had fluffy snow all inside the tire. I think sealant would have been a complete PITA to deal with in that instance. Plus, I could envision trying not to get my gloves wet from the sealant risking an issue with freezing my hands.

Unless I had wheels that were tubeless compatible and didn’t require a bunch of monkey business to inflate I won’t bother with it. Dirt bikes and adventure bikes run tube style tires so you can fix a flat out on the trail. Maybe bicycle tubeless tires have gotten better since I looked into it but the last time I played around with it I needed and air compressor to seat the beads. I don’t carry either an air compressor or large, shop type hand pump out on the trail when riding.

Posted: Feb 23, 2019 at 9:01 Quote
Not true.
You only need low pressure (3-5 psi) when conditions are poor/soft.
Low pressure needs to be avoided due to excessive self steer ( the bike handles like shit ) and it eats up the WATTS big time.
I use lighter 2.7 tubes in my 4.8's with ZERO problems at any PSI , but would like to go tubeless and shed even more weight.

Posted: Feb 24, 2019 at 1:15 Quote
BCMarc wrote:
Not true.
You only need low pressure (3-5 psi) when conditions are poor/soft.
Low pressure needs to be avoided due to excessive self steer ( the bike handles like shit ) and it eats up the WATTS big time.
I use lighter 2.7 tubes in my 4.8's with ZERO problems at any PSI , but would like to go tubeless and shed even more weight.

It’s apparent that you don’t ride in the same soft snow conditions that I do. That said the new tubeless, carbon wheels I’m currently running have not blown a bead at low pressures but the front doesn’t hold air worth a shit since it is leaking out of the spoke nipples. I’m still of the opinion that bicycle tubeless is currently a halfass system but I will admit I enjoy the better performance over running tubes.

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