2019 Stumpjumper Evo

PB Forum :: Specialized
2019 Stumpjumper Evo
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Posted: Nov 18, 2019 at 23:17 Quote
R-M-R wrote:

The only ways to make it feel softer without changing ride height are to remove positive spring spacers, as moity noted, and/or reduce compression damping.

Maybe a third option: if your rebound damper is set far too slow, speed it up.

I have been told they are over damped from factory so it might be worth a retune. I will have a play with smaller positive volume spacers but I imagine it will bottom out harshly.
I run the rebound at base setting and sometimes one click faster depending on where I ride so I don't think it's particularly slow.

Thanks for the advice I will definitely have a play ????

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 0:09 Quote
doxey91 wrote:
I have been told they are over damped from factory so it might be worth a retune. I will have a play with smaller positive volume spacers but I imagine it will bottom out harshly.
I run the rebound at base setting and sometimes one click faster depending on where I ride so I don't think it's particularly slow.

Thanks for the advice I will definitely have a play ????

The only ways to keep a bike from bottoming out are to increase support from the spring and the damper. The resistance has to come from somewhere.

Sometimes the solution is opposite from what you may expect. People often reduce spring pressure and reduce compression damping, as these are the source of "firmness", and assume this will also eliminate "harshness". Then, to keep it from bottoming out, they add a huge stack of volume reducers. The result is a bike that's super soft ... until it hits a wall of resistance. It's the same total amount of resistance, it just starts super soft and ends super firm.

It may be less "harsh" to allow a little more force initially (air pressure and/or compression damping) to avoid hitting a wall of force later, thus producing a more uniform resistance profile. I don't know enough about your set-up to say if this is the case for you; the point is that you don't necessarily want to remove support to remove harshness.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 0:56 Quote
Well I’m gonna try the deluxe rt3 and a Megneg and report back.

I don’t think it will arrive in time for my nz trip unfortunately.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 3:33 Quote
I had the Fox shock re-tuned by Jake at Sprung in the Forest of Dean.
His response to the std tune is, it's poor for the type of bike it is.
the original tune is a generic trail tune that prevents a lot of pedal bob but creates a harsh initial hit and poor small bump response.
My bike is a 650b S3 Evo and I'm 6 foot and 14 stone (fat git) I run 245 psi with the new tune and can confirm that it is a different feel completely. I did BPW back to back. two days. one on the std tune and one on Jakes tune.
Big hits and long rough descents are massively improved. Also, no spacer is run in the shock. The climb still goes pretty firm and trail and wide open are alot smoother. It's a much better ride

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 4:05 Quote
PhilBlackborow wrote:
I had the Fox shock re-tuned by Jake at Sprung in the Forest of Dean.
His response to the std tune is, it's poor for the type of bike it is.
the original tune is a generic trail tune that prevents a lot of pedal bob but creates a harsh initial hit and poor small bump response.
My bike is a 650b S3 Evo and I'm 6 foot and 14 stone (fat git) I run 245 psi with the new tune and can confirm that it is a different feel completely. I did BPW back to back. two days. one on the std tune and one on Jakes tune.
Big hits and long rough descents are massively improved. Also, no spacer is run in the shock. The climb still goes pretty firm and trail and wide open are alot smoother. It's a much better ride

Can you tell us what you exactly asked for the tune to be? I used to send out my shocks to TF Tuned in the UK, and they always seemed to ask what i want to get out of it.
Thank you.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 9:37 Quote
R-M-R wrote:

The only ways to keep a bike from bottoming out are to increase support from the spring and the damper. The resistance has to come from somewhere.

Sometimes the solution is opposite from what you may expect. People often reduce spring pressure and reduce compression damping, as these are the source of "firmness", and assume this will also eliminate "harshness". Then, to keep it from bottoming out, they add a huge stack of volume reducers. The result is a bike that's super soft ... until it hits a wall of resistance. It's the same total amount of resistance, it just starts super soft and ends super firm.

It may be less "harsh" to allow a little more force initially (air pressure and/or compression damping) to avoid hitting a wall of force later, thus producing a more uniform resistance profile. I don't know enough about your set-up to say if this is the case for you; the point is that you don't necessarily want to remove support to remove harshness.

I have heard push industries also talk about firming up suspension to make it feel softer to avoid that wall of resistance which could potentially be the harshness felt. Definitely going to have a play thanks again.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 10:25 Quote
Darkysh wrote:
PhilBlackborow wrote:
I had the Fox shock re-tuned by Jake at Sprung in the Forest of Dean.
His response to the std tune is, it's poor for the type of bike it is.
the original tune is a generic trail tune that prevents a lot of pedal bob but creates a harsh initial hit and poor small bump response.
My bike is a 650b S3 Evo and I'm 6 foot and 14 stone (fat git) I run 245 psi with the new tune and can confirm that it is a different feel completely. I did BPW back to back. two days. one on the std tune and one on Jakes tune.
Big hits and long rough descents are massively improved. Also, no spacer is run in the shock. The climb still goes pretty firm and trail and wide open are alot smoother. It's a much better ride

Can you tell us what you exactly asked for the tune to be? I used to send out my shocks to TF Tuned in the UK, and they always seemed to ask what i want to get out of it.
Thank you.

I can't sorry, it's a custom tune. I generally leave Jake to it. If you knew his history I'm sure you'd be happy to do the same. I know the shims were rearranged and the shocks progression was adjusted all to suit my weight a bit more and make the compression smooth throughout the stroke. It used to feel like I'd landed while locked out and then start to compress. Doesn't anymore

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 19:24 Quote
doxey91 wrote:
I have heard push industries also talk about firming up suspension to make it feel softer to avoid that wall of resistance which could potentially be the harshness felt. Definitely going to have a play thanks again.

Salute

Posted: Nov 20, 2019 at 9:01 Quote
does anyone know if the 27.5 stumpy evo has the same 5mm spacer in the DHX2 rear shock

and what does snipping it off up the travel to?

Is the 154mm travel figure for a 29er with the spacer removed? or is that both wheel sizes?

cheers

Posted: Nov 20, 2019 at 10:04 Quote
I'd say it probably has a 2.5mm spacer. 55mm shock equals ~157mm for the 27.5

Posted: Nov 24, 2019 at 23:24 Quote
So the dpx2 has now lost all it's damping anybody had any experience with warranty on these things? I don't feel like it should have failed after one slight over shoot on a jump and one case on some fairly flowey trails. And I also did one run in the middle instead of open on the compression lever.

Posted: Nov 25, 2019 at 1:53 Quote
doxey91 wrote:
So the dpx2 has now lost all it's damping anybody had any experience with warranty on these things? I don't feel like it should have failed after one slight over shoot on a jump and one case on some fairly flowey trails. And I also did one run in the middle instead of open on the compression lever.

Cut your losses dude, go to Sprungs web page, book it in and get it sorted!

Posted: Nov 25, 2019 at 3:54 Quote
PhilBlackborow wrote:

Cut your losses dude, go to Sprungs web page, book it in and get it sorted!

I'll see what the bike shop can do first. No point spending money before hand as I've heard specialized can sometimes offer credit towards something different if the issue persists. Not sure how true that is but we will see

Posted: Nov 25, 2019 at 10:53 Quote
There is a guy on mtbr who has killed half a dozen dpx2’s now. Seems to be a frame alignment issue.

In all my experience with specialized warranty, you will be sorted out quickly and painlessly. They do warranty very well.

Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 0:31 Quote
Brasher wrote:
There is a guy on mtbr who has killed half a dozen dpx2’s now. Seems to be a frame alignment issue.

In all my experience with specialized warranty, you will be sorted out quickly and painlessly. They do warranty very well.


Thanks that's very reassuring. It's one of the main reasons I went for this bike so hopefully it's sorted quickly. It's the bike shop I'm dealing with that might be the downfall of getting it sorted as when I rang them they said to bring it in so they could pump it back up after explaining the damping circuit had definitely failed ಠ_ಠ


 
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