2019 Stumpjumper Evo

PB Forum :: Specialized
2019 Stumpjumper Evo
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Posted: Oct 31, 2021 at 20:47 Quote
If it makes any difference, I'm 165 and have a 2019 S3 29 Pro. Yeah its a big bike but I reduced the reach slightly by running a 33mm length stem.

I like the longer feeling as it feels very stable in the steeps and fast sections. Yes its a bit cumbersome in tight/slower areas but nothing you cant improve on with riding style and body English.

The suggested size for my height was a S2. I honestly think whichever you will buy, it will feel right after a few days riding if not straight away. Nothing will be perfect and chances are, you will be having too much fun to even have time to think about if the frame is the right size. IF you do think about that, reconsider if it really matters as its always going to be a tradeoff between the two; Its either going to feel too small on fast sections or too long on slow sections. If you cant tell the difference, it don't matter.

Posted: Nov 1, 2021 at 14:43 Quote
jooose wrote:
Hi Everyone!

Looking for someone to shine a light with sizing here.
Im 1.74m, looking into buying a 2019 specialized stumpjumper 29 evo alloy with a 160mm fox 36 up front and rear canecreek coil suspension.

The bike is s3, you think itll fit big? should i continue looking for s2?
Ill typically tide trail and ever two weekend go to a bikepark. Love mission focused rides too.

Im 1.73m, s2 is perfect on me, and i run a super short stem (32mm) you could get some bars with a bigger rake back and a shorter stem to help on size, but i think an s3 in the 2019 evo would be to large especially if you want it to be a bit more playful

Posted: Nov 2, 2021 at 3:14 Quote
I wanted my evo to be on the more playful end of spectrum so at 178cm i got an S2 27.5

the bike still feels unbelievably stable at rough high speeds, so i'm glad i did. i don't think i would have gotten on with an S3.

Posted: Nov 2, 2021 at 7:41 Quote
blackjack88 wrote:
I wanted my evo to be on the more playful end of spectrum so at 178cm i got an S2 27.5

the bike still feels unbelievably stable at rough high speeds, so i'm glad i did. i don't think i would have gotten on with an S3.

The slacked out geo, and long chain stay, no matter what size you get the bikes a plow machine greatest bike specialized has ever made… in this case wheel choice is just about preference wether u wanna plow or be steezy

Posted: Nov 5, 2021 at 7:27 Quote
I am 180cm and ride a 2019 Evo Alloy 29r size S2 . I wouldn't want a longer bike.


severniy wrote:
S2 2019/2020= S3 2021; S3 2019/2020 = S4 2021

I’m 178. And have S3 29. While I’m mostly satisfied with the bike, sometimes I take my wife’s S2 29. It’s more playful while still stable enough for my speed and my skill. If I were you - I would look for S2

jooose wrote:
No man, what i mean is that when specialized released the 2019 alloy evo 29 they had two sizes. the reach that they had then does not correlate to the current size distribution. Thats why its a bit confusing to understand which could fit better.

jakalwil wrote:


I think you’re referencing the current Stumpjumper frame sizes. The 2019 Evo only came in S2 and S3, both of which were stretched way out compared to the standard models.

At your height the S3 is doable but will probably feel a bit too tall, long and cumbersome at lower speeds / flatter terrain. Probably a good fit for you hanging on at full speed in the bike park though.

Posted: Nov 7, 2021 at 7:49 Quote
Hi all,
I've got a 2020 alloy evo 29er with a cascade link and 160mm up front.
I'm thinking about putting a coil shock on for shits and giggles.

Looking at the cane creek kitsuma, just wondering if anyone has any suggestions or recommendations.

Is it even worth putting a coil on?

Posted: Nov 7, 2021 at 10:35 Quote
exohkay wrote:
Hi all,
I've got a 2020 alloy evo 29er with a cascade link and 160mm up front.
I'm thinking about putting a coil shock on for shits and giggles.

Looking at the cane creek kitsuma, just wondering if anyone has any suggestions or recommendations.

Is it even worth putting a coil on?

I've been running the same bike with the same setup (160mm fork with a cascade link) and would definitely recommend a Fox X2 over a coil for this build. I have a 2020 Evo Pro which came stock with a dhx2, however after countless coil swaps and several phone calls to Specialized and Fox I couldn't stop the constant bottom outs and lack of support from the coil set up even when running a 700# spring (I'm 180lbs fully kitted). I even tried to contact PUSH Industries to get a custom shock built so that I could get the coil performance I was looking for without constantly clapping, but they said it simply wouldn't work. Both Fox and Push said that essentially the high leverage ratio in the beginning of the stroke with the cascade link paired with a fairly short stroke length prevents linear suspension from working well and that I was better off running an air shock. I ended up selling the DHX2, bought a cheap secondhand dpx2 off PB, and have never looked back. The bike is so much more fun with an air shock plus no more harsh bottom outs. I have a DH bike so I went with a dpx2 vs an X2 seeing as I mostly used it for trail riding and the X2 is much heavier, however I plan on getting the new FLOAT X over the winter. Hope this helps

Posted: Nov 7, 2021 at 14:24 Quote
exohkay wrote:
Hi all,
I've got a 2020 alloy evo 29er with a cascade link and 160mm up front.
I'm thinking about putting a coil shock on for shits and giggles.

Looking at the cane creek kitsuma, just wondering if anyone has any suggestions or recommendations.

Is it even worth putting a coil on?

Short answer yes but there are some limitations to consider with running a coil.

Like the reply above, I have the 29 pro that has a DHX2 as standard. I am still running it however I have made two changes to improve it. I removed the travel limiting spacer (snipped off with pliers as its only a nylon ring) which gave me 5mm additional travel and also installed a Cane Creek progressive spring. This gave the bike the much needed ramp up toward the end of stroke. Yes it will still bottom sometimes but more comparable to the bottoming you would get with an airshock so I can live with it.

With the standard spring (linear) at the correct springrate, (basing this on 25-30% sag) it did blow through too much of the travel. The leverage ratio curve is just not progressive enough to suit coils unless you run a high springrate but then you lose the coil sensitivity.

Moving to a progressive spring was defiantly a good move. Sort of the best of both worlds but not perfect in either. Probably similar to what you would get in an airshock. There's always going to be a tradeoff.

Only further thing I would keep in mind is the shaft diameter of a coil spring if you go down that route. The setup of shock mounting the SJ uses has the added drawback of putting lateral forces on the shaft during compressions. This can in time, cause the shaft to wear the seals or in extreme cases shear apart. Try and find the biggest shaft you can. DHX2 shafts are very small in diameter. Mine hasn't failed yet but I'm starting to get leakage. Once it goes, ill be trying the warranty route. If that fails, ill buy an EXT Storia or a Jade X. Don't think I will convert to air just yet.

Note you have a Cascade link which I do not. They are supposed to improve the leverage curve so running a coil with that and a progressive spring, I would think you would be comparable to running just an airshock.

Posted: Nov 7, 2021 at 18:29 Quote
mitch1992 wrote:
exohkay wrote:
Hi all,
I've got a 2020 alloy evo 29er with a cascade link and 160mm up front.
I'm thinking about putting a coil shock on for shits and giggles.

Looking at the cane creek kitsuma, just wondering if anyone has any suggestions or recommendations.

Is it even worth putting a coil on?

Short answer yes but there are some limitations to consider with running a coil.

Like the reply above, I have the 29 pro that has a DHX2 as standard. I am still running it however I have made two changes to improve it. I removed the travel limiting spacer (snipped off with pliers as its only a nylon ring) which gave me 5mm additional travel and also installed a Cane Creek progressive spring. This gave the bike the much needed ramp up toward the end of stroke. Yes it will still bottom sometimes but more comparable to the bottoming you would get with an airshock so I can live with it.

With the standard spring (linear) at the correct springrate, (basing this on 25-30% sag) it did blow through too much of the travel. The leverage ratio curve is just not progressive enough to suit coils unless you run a high springrate but then you lose the coil sensitivity.

Moving to a progressive spring was defiantly a good move. Sort of the best of both worlds but not perfect in either. Probably similar to what you would get in an airshock. There's always going to be a tradeoff.

Only further thing I would keep in mind is the shaft diameter of a coil spring if you go down that route. The setup of shock mounting the SJ uses has the added drawback of putting lateral forces on the shaft during compressions. This can in time, cause the shaft to wear the seals or in extreme cases shear apart. Try and find the biggest shaft you can. DHX2 shafts are very small in diameter. Mine hasn't failed yet but I'm starting to get leakage. Once it goes, ill be trying the warranty route. If that fails, ill buy an EXT Storia or a Jade X. Don't think I will convert to air just yet.

Note you have a Cascade link which I do not. They are supposed to improve the leverage curve so running a coil with that and a progressive spring, I would think you would be comparable to running just an airshock.

The cascade link definitely does improve the lev curve by making it more progressive, but if you look at the graph they supply you’ll find that it actually starts out with a much higher leverage ratio than even the stock link. I think thats why I couldn’t find success running a coil shock even with a progressive spring. The issue with springs such as the cane creek paired with the cascade link is that, by being progressive, the initial stroke is actually softer than a linear spring (for example 480lbs-650lbs vs a standard 600#) which allows the linkage to blow through the initial travel with little resistance. At this point even with the ramp up at the end the spring can’t compensate and you end up bottoming out. I’m also on the heavier side at 180lbs so a lighter rider might have a totally different perspective. I agreed that the small diameter of the DHX2 has a hard time dealing with the side loading from yoke interface, I blew mine out within 3 months.

Posted: Nov 7, 2021 at 23:01 Quote
15efaklaris wrote:
mitch1992 wrote:
exohkay wrote:
Hi all,
I've got a 2020 alloy evo 29er with a cascade link and 160mm up front.
I'm thinking about putting a coil shock on for shits and giggles.

Looking at the cane creek kitsuma, just wondering if anyone has any suggestions or recommendations.

Is it even worth putting a coil on?

Short answer yes but there are some limitations to consider with running a coil.

Like the reply above, I have the 29 pro that has a DHX2 as standard. I am still running it however I have made two changes to improve it. I removed the travel limiting spacer (snipped off with pliers as its only a nylon ring) which gave me 5mm additional travel and also installed a Cane Creek progressive spring. This gave the bike the much needed ramp up toward the end of stroke. Yes it will still bottom sometimes but more comparable to the bottoming you would get with an airshock so I can live with it.

With the standard spring (linear) at the correct springrate, (basing this on 25-30% sag) it did blow through too much of the travel. The leverage ratio curve is just not progressive enough to suit coils unless you run a high springrate but then you lose the coil sensitivity.

Moving to a progressive spring was defiantly a good move. Sort of the best of both worlds but not perfect in either. Probably similar to what you would get in an airshock. There's always going to be a tradeoff.

Only further thing I would keep in mind is the shaft diameter of a coil spring if you go down that route. The setup of shock mounting the SJ uses has the added drawback of putting lateral forces on the shaft during compressions. This can in time, cause the shaft to wear the seals or in extreme cases shear apart. Try and find the biggest shaft you can. DHX2 shafts are very small in diameter. Mine hasn't failed yet but I'm starting to get leakage. Once it goes, ill be trying the warranty route. If that fails, ill buy an EXT Storia or a Jade X. Don't think I will convert to air just yet.

Note you have a Cascade link which I do not. They are supposed to improve the leverage curve so running a coil with that and a progressive spring, I would think you would be comparable to running just an airshock.

The cascade link definitely does improve the lev curve by making it more progressive, but if you look at the graph they supply you’ll find that it actually starts out with a much higher leverage ratio than even the stock link. I think thats why I couldn’t find success running a coil shock even with a progressive spring. The issue with springs such as the cane creek paired with the cascade link is that, by being progressive, the initial stroke is actually softer than a linear spring (for example 480lbs-650lbs vs a standard 600#) which allows the linkage to blow through the initial travel with little resistance. At this point even with the ramp up at the end the spring can’t compensate and you end up bottoming out. I’m also on the heavier side at 180lbs so a lighter rider might have a totally different perspective. I agreed that the small diameter of the DHX2 has a hard time dealing with the side loading from yoke interface, I blew mine out within 3 months.

I'm also 180# and running a Cascade link with a #600 spring which gives proper sag. I ran the stock DPX2 which didn't work at all, and a Cane Creek Kitsuma Air which was an improvement but never worked well either. I now have a DVO Jade X that was custom tuned with a different piston and valving which feels really dialed. It was unrideable out of the box with the stock tune and crazy leverage ratio of the Cascade link. I still bottom a bit on big G-outs or hard bike park landings, but it is amazing for fast chunky trail riding and the long 4K foot descents where I live.

The other thing I really like about the Jade X are the 2 lockout settings we played with during the tune. The middle setting has a bit more LSC than stock and climbs super well, and the actual lockout is a legit 100% lockout. No movement and sits the bike high up in the travel with a steeper head angle which makes a big difference on long road or fire-road climbs. The Cane Creek had a lot less support and sat 1/3 of the way down locked out which made the head angle feel like it was sub 60 degrees. Not fun for climbing.

Posted: Nov 21, 2021 at 20:09 Quote
I took my bike out to Ignition Festival at Falls Creek, Victoria over the weekend and I'm pretty happy with the bikes' performance.

The rear shock felt quite good actually, especially on some of the longer descents. Having the slack HT and 29er really made a big difference. I'd like to try a coil on it but overall pretty happy with the current setup and don't feel the need to change anything.

I do have the largest volume spacer in it and I run about 220psi, though my sag is about 25%, so could take a little pressure out.

Posted: Jan 19, 2022 at 12:50 Quote
Hey Guys,

Just came across this thread, and I love it! I've had my 19' stumpy EVO for a few months now and couldn't ask for more from what it's given me over the 500 miles I've ridden so far. Sadly I cannot claim credit for this build as I bought a lot of it used though. Really frickin enjoying riding this bike like no other, but I had a theory... what would happen if I went full 29". I'd need a new fork, but even though it was the 27.5 frame, it does seem to have a remarkable amount of clearance (~2"). Does anyone else have experience with this? Just imagining that clearance might not be the only issue, as the angles and BB height could very well be off? Not sure.


Also been seeing a lot of side-loading going on with this gen but of Levos, and I've heard that it can also happen with the 19' stumpy, but has anyone here had that issue? If so, is there anything I should be looking out for?

Cheers,
Jacoby

Posted: Jan 19, 2022 at 14:15 Quote
JacobyDH wrote:
... what would happen if I went full 29". I'd need a new fork, but even though it was the 27.5 frame, it does seem to have a remarkable amount of clearance (~2"). Does anyone else have experience with this? Just imagining that clearance might not be the only issue, as the angles and BB height could very well be off? Not sure.

Also been seeing a lot of side-loading going on with this gen but of Levos, and I've heard that it can also happen with the 19' stumpy, but has anyone here had that issue? If so, is there anything I should be looking out for?

I recall a few people on another forum running those 650b Evo frames with dual 29 wheels, obviously it will raise the BB which could actually be nice considering how low it is stock. Angles aren't gonna change if you keep both wheels the same size...

Pretty any frame using an extended clevis mount is prone to shock side-loading, including the Evo. Not really anything you can do about it, just be cautious if you consider swapping the shock as many can't handle the side-loading (most coils)

Posted: Jan 19, 2022 at 14:27 Quote
lyzyrdskydr wrote:
JacobyDH wrote:
... what would happen if I went full 29". I'd need a new fork, but even though it was the 27.5 frame, it does seem to have a remarkable amount of clearance (~2"). Does anyone else have experience with this? Just imagining that clearance might not be the only issue, as the angles and BB height could very well be off? Not sure.

Also been seeing a lot of side-loading going on with this gen but of Levos, and I've heard that it can also happen with the 19' stumpy, but has anyone here had that issue? If so, is there anything I should be looking out for?

I recall a few people on another forum running those 650b Evo frames with dual 29 wheels, obviously it will raise the BB which could actually be nice considering how low it is stock. Angles aren't gonna change if you keep both wheels the same size...

Pretty any frame using an extended clevis mount is prone to shock side-loading, including the Evo. Not really anything you can do about it, just be cautious if you consider swapping the shock as many can't handle the side-loading (most coils)

it'll work, but I think the geometry will change, more than just the BB height, as you'll have to use a 29" fork which is a little longer...I was able to fit a 29" rear on mine, slapped a fork and front wheel on to, but didn't get to really ride it, as it was just during a multiple bike maintenance party, lol...the limited street cruise felt like my normal evo, flip chip in low, just taller...didn't feel the like floppier front end with 27.5 wheels and 170mm fork though...(again, light street ride only)...

I actually liked it enough that I'm contemplating looking for a fork and wheelset...

Posted: Jan 19, 2022 at 14:39 Quote
safetybreaker wrote:
it'll work, but I think the geometry will change, more than just the BB height, as you'll have to use a 29" fork which is a little longer...I was able to fit a 29" rear on mine, slapped a fork and front wheel on to, but didn't get to really ride it, as it was just during a multiple bike maintenance party, lol...the limited street cruise felt like my normal evo, flip chip in low, just taller...didn't feel the like floppier front end with 27.5 wheels and 170mm fork though...(again, light street ride only)...

I actually liked it enough that I'm contemplating looking for a fork and wheelset...

Yeah you're right I forgot about the taller A-C height on the 29 fork, if you ran the 29 fork at 150mm the geo change would be minimal.


 
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