Unhappy Sick Bicycles Customers. BEWARE!

PB Forum :: United Kingdom
Unhappy Sick Bicycles Customers. BEWARE!
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Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 10:57 Quote
titaniumtit wrote:
Genuinely worthy of £180 which mine were even added freebies in with super fast delivery.
Once try Ti never go Bi haha

What do you like about the titanium bars? Obviously they look great and are made by local folks, and maybe that's enough to make them worthwhile. Just trying to see your perspective.

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 11:07 Quote
Have you ridden Ti bars?
Dammit, that sounds like a really impertinent question - promise it's not meant to be; you're clearly one of the most knowledgeable dudes here. Intended more as an "if you haven't tried them, then it's worth a go as they really do feel different IMO".
Honestly I genuinely believe they are more comfortable than carbon or alu, to an extent that would be measurable in a properly conducted double-blind trial (admittedly it would require some clever disguising, given that tapping one's fingernail on carbon easily differentiates it from Ti or alu). My arms seem to fatigue less when riding them, my wrists are happier, so riding for longer periods is more pleasant.
Having said that, I've never tried the Rust Components ones, and obviously there is more to the riding characteristics of an item than the main component of the alloy from which it is made Wink
I now have Ti bars on both MTBs, and am deliberating getting a third set for the next build even though it's supposed to be a "budget" one.
You know that unique sort of floaty and slightly damped, but still kinda nicely zingy and yet not disconnected feeling you get from a good Ti frame? The bars do the same thing, or at least the Kingdom ones do.

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 11:54 Quote
Mmmm triple butted Ti bars are to die for... mmmmmm mmmm

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 11:54 Quote
Mega light too compared with previous narrow 730 Thompsons I had

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 12:14 Quote
OneBanana wrote:
Have you ridden Ti bars?
Dammit, that sounds like a really impertinent question - promise it's not meant to be; you're clearly one of the most knowledgeable dudes here. Intended more as an "if you haven't tried them, then it's worth a go as they really do feel different IMO".
Honestly I genuinely believe they are more comfortable than carbon or alu, to an extent that would be measurable in a properly conducted double-blind trial (admittedly it would require some clever disguising, given that tapping one's fingernail on carbon easily differentiates it from Ti or alu). My arms seem to fatigue less when riding them, my wrists are happier, so riding for longer periods is more pleasant.
Having said that, I've never tried the Rust Components ones, and obviously there is more to the riding characteristics of an item than the main component of the alloy from which it is made Wink
I now have Ti bars on both MTBs, and am deliberating getting a third set for the next build even though it's supposed to be a "budget" one.
You know that unique sort of floaty and slightly damped, but still kinda nicely zingy and yet not disconnected feeling you get from a good Ti frame? The bars do the same thing, or at least the Kingdom ones do.

I haven't, which is why I'm interested. Well, sub-600-mm Dean, Merlin, and Litespeed bars in the '90s don't really count.

It's possible some titanium bars have more flex than aluminum bars, which will feel more comfortable. Stiff stems and flexible bars are the right way to balance comfort and control. I've used many carbon bars in the past four years with dramatically different ride characteristics, ranging from the stiffest to the softest I've ever experienced.

If a titanium bar feels soft, that's not inherent to the material; it's a design choice. A titanium bar could just as easily be designed as the stiffest bar on the market. When comparing steel, aluminum (or aluminium, if you prefer), and titanium, each has one notable plus and minus:

Aluminum
+ Low density
- Low strength

Titanium
+ High specific strength (strength ÷ density)
- Low modulus

Steel
+ Extremely high strength
- Extremely high density

Among metals, titanium is a great material for handlebars when clamp diameter is limited. Now that we have larger clamps available, aluminum puts up a good fight. It would be interesting to compare the fatigue life and impact strength of soft feeling titanium bars vs. other materials, including the best of the current aluminum bars.

Thanks for your feedback!


P.S. Etched titanium bars do look really nice! Maybe a faint rainbow anodized finish for the logos ...

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 12:40 Quote
Someone has managed to land a Sick Marino frame, found this by stalking the #sickbicycles hashtag.
Maybe some t shirt sales funded a one off customs release?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BzDg6GQAxuZ/?igshid=1u17utkad58kx

Few of the usual fanbois commenting too.

Could sick be back? Again?

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 12:43 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
snip
Yes, that's fair analysis - and I'll happily concede that there is almost certainly a degree of confirmation bias and I just keep buying bars that I know I like, as the alternative is another gamble on carbon/alu that could be anywhere between comfortable and bone-shattering, for very little saving in real terms (at least as far as carbon is concerned).
And FWIW, one of the bars I have is PVD coated in black so looks rather like a nondescript alu bar, so it's not even just about the alluring look of brushed Ti lol
I'd genuinely be very curious to see some actual analytical data too. I wonder what the chances are of manufactures agreeing a standardised testing regime and being prepared to publish the results, or indeed whether that many people would care about that sort of data?

In any case, if you feel like treating yourself then try a modern pair, and if you find yourself in the UK then PM me and I'll loan you one to test tup

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 12:47 Quote
burnonestartanother wrote:
Someone has managed to land a Sick Marino frame, found this by stalking the #sickbicycles hashtag.
Maybe some t shirt sales funded a one off customs release?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BzDg6GQAxuZ/?igshid=1u17utkad58kx

Few of the usual fanbois commenting too.

Could sick be back? Again?

Isn't that one of the 'dead stock' frames they were advertising for cheap a while ago (and still are), seemingly to try and raise funds for the Marino issue?

https://sickbicycle.co/collections/frames/products/hacksaw-v2

And crucially, is that what the poster originally ordered?

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 13:03 Quote
OneBanana wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
snip
Yes, that's fair analysis - and I'll happily concede that there is almost certainly a degree of confirmation bias and I just keep buying bars that I know I like, as the alternative is another gamble on carbon/alu that could be anywhere between comfortable and bone-shattering, for very little saving in real terms (at least as far as carbon is concerned).
And FWIW, one of the bars I have is PVD coated in black so looks rather like a nondescript alu bar, so it's not even just about the alluring look of brushed Ti lol
I'd genuinely be very curious to see some actual analytical data too. I wonder what the chances are of manufactures agreeing a standardised testing regime and being prepared to publish the results, or indeed whether that many people would care about that sort of data?

In any case, if you feel like treating yourself then try a modern pair, and if you find yourself in the UK then PM me and I'll loan you one to test tup

That's very kind of you. Don't know when I'll be on your side of the Atlantic, but there's a growing list of people with whom I'd like to meet up!

When designing frames or components, the obvious first stem is to ensure sufficient strength and stiffness at an acceptable weight. If each parameter is at least met at a minimum level, each of the Big Three metals exceeds at least the minimum of one parameter - ex. Steel is a bit high on weight and low on stiffness - producing the characteristic ride of a frame made from that material. The designer could design out those features, such as making an incredibly stiff steel frame, but if that's the goal, then another material would've been a better choice (in this case aluminum), so the designer might as well embrace the quirks of the material. Most people mistake this for an inherent property of the material, when it's really a design choice / opportunity. As an example, the stiffest and most flexible road bikes I've ever ridden were both aluminum; the latter felt more "like steel" than any steel bike!

Anyway, there are ISO standards for handlebars, so that's a starting point. Many companies use EFBE or the EFBE test protocols for supplementary testing. EFBE has various options, though, and companies rarely publish which test was performed and they never publish how the product performed. EFBE does have a database of test results that can be published with permission and accessed by clients.

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 15:17 Quote
Yh right, I for one would like to know comparative results of data for fatigue / strength vs say Renthals. ;-)

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 15:57 Quote
tomhoward379 wrote:
burnonestartanother wrote:
Someone has managed to land a Sick Marino frame, found this by stalking the #sickbicycles hashtag.
Maybe some t shirt sales funded a one off customs release?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BzDg6GQAxuZ/?igshid=1u17utkad58kx

Few of the usual fanbois commenting too.

Could sick be back? Again?

Isn't that one of the 'dead stock' frames they were advertising for cheap a while ago (and still are), seemingly to try and raise funds for the Marino issue?

https://sickbicycle.co/collections/frames/products/hacksaw-v2

And crucially, is that what the poster originally ordered?


It could be a deadstock frame, or a one off. Iirc Sick never ever ever landed a single 'big delivery', it was only ever hypothetically talked or dreamed about rather. They only ever got a few one offs made for their mates.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 3:26 Quote
Frame has arrived from Peru. Paid €113 in customs duties. Shipping was quite fast, but Austrian Customs were slow.

 sick bicycle co ruby wulf which was never delivered by sick bicycle co. Instead ordered from Marino bikes directly after 3 months of no response from sick.
Intermediate build stage of my Ruby Wulf frame

Rest of the buid has to wait until I receive some small parts and my shoulder is OK again (built it basically one-handed until this stage...)

The frame looks very nice, I am super excited to ride this in July.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 3:53 Quote
Looks really nice man
Kainerm wrote:
Frame has arrived from Peru. Paid €113 in customs duties. Shipping was quite fast, but Austrian Customs were slow.

 sick bicycle co ruby wulf which was never delivered by sick bicycle co. Instead ordered from Marino bikes directly after 3 months of no response from sick.
Intermediate build stage of my Ruby Wulf frame

Rest of the buid has to wait until I receive some small parts and my shoulder is OK again (built it basically one-handed until this stage...)

The frame looks very nice, I am super excited to ride this in July.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 4:12 Quote
that look S!ck…. oh wait.... lol

nice build. Does it have any 'sick' branding on it? Or have you managed to avoid such filth!?

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 4:24 Quote
Well there is the engraved logo on the headtube (the S with an exclamation point), and the "Wulf" engraving on the chainstay.
Additionally, the rear axle has sick bicycle co written on it (not visible when installed) and the seat clamp has sick written on it. Nothing major.


 
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