Formula Cura 4 vs Hope T3 V4 vs Shimano XTR BR-M9120

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Formula Cura 4 vs Hope T3 V4 vs Shimano XTR BR-M9120
Author Message
Posted: Jul 18, 2019 at 6:03 Quote
SCPL wrote:
I have gold C4 180/203mm and done 250km with them.
My bike weights around 12,8kg.
They don't look as fancy as red T3, which I had, but they match very well with Kashima coating, for me it's same colour.
Modulation is very linear and I wasn't surprised by it.
At the begining power is very subtle, great for everyday riding in city.
In the end, they are very strong. I can't tell that they are or not stronger than T3/XTR, but I never though that I need more power.
Only weakness which I found are disks. Formula doesn't have floating disks yet, hope that they will release some.

Warning. THEY WONT WORK WITH HOPE DISKS, due to dimensions.

Hey there SCPL... not sure if your listening since this is an older thread.

What is the comparability issue with hope rotors? Too thick? Diameter? Clearance with floating disc rivets?

Thanks!

Posted: Jul 18, 2019 at 15:34 Quote
Niner09 wrote:
SCPL wrote:
I have gold C4 180/203mm and done 250km with them.
My bike weights around 12,8kg.
They don't look as fancy as red T3, which I had, but they match very well with Kashima coating, for me it's same colour.
Modulation is very linear and I wasn't surprised by it.
At the begining power is very subtle, great for everyday riding in city.
In the end, they are very strong. I can't tell that they are or not stronger than T3/XTR, but I never though that I need more power.
Only weakness which I found are disks. Formula doesn't have floating disks yet, hope that they will release some.

Warning. THEY WONT WORK WITH HOPE DISKS, due to dimensions.

Hey there SCPL... not sure if your listening since this is an older thread.

What is the comparability issue with hope rotors? Too thick? Diameter? Clearance with floating disc rivets?

Thanks!

Hello. Hope disks are floating. They have like 6 circle spacers which are about 2-3mm wider than disk. Sorry, I don't know what's the name of this part. This part is blocking C4 caliper. Described situation occurs for front 203mm rotor. On rear I have 180mm Hope disk and it's ok, but very close to pads. Generally I don't recommend combining Hope disks with C4.

Posted: Jul 19, 2019 at 3:30 Quote
Thanks for following up! Thought that may be the issue. I’ve run into that before combining other brakes with hope rotors.

Posted: Jul 25, 2019 at 20:00 Quote
Apologies for the late post on bleed tips but this might be helpful to someone.

The Epic Bleed Solutions method for AVID and Formula DOT worked really well for me - http://www.epicbleedsolutions.com/resources/pdf/epic-instructions-avid-formula.pdf

I tried the method Formula outlines for mineral oil on their Youtube channel but ended up with a soft (workable but soft) lever feel.

The difference between the two methods is that the Epic side has you degas the fluid (not sure if that is really needed for mineral oil but a ton of tiny bubbles were pulled out in each syringe), using the syringe clip to create the vacuum rather than holding the plunger (minor difference), and the rubber band on the lever at a point in the process.

Using this method I ended up with about 10 minutes or so of tiny bubbles coming out of the lever/master cylinder and moved my lever to a couple of different angles.

When done the lever was nice and firm.

YMMV of course but for me this method was easier to execute on my part I think.

Posted: Aug 31, 2019 at 14:45 Quote
I'm thinking about picking up a set of Cura 4's myself, I was wondering if anyone can help me with what the riding characteristics are like? Are they grabby like Shimano or do they have that sram modulation feeling? Thanks for any help!

Posted: Sep 15, 2019 at 9:35 Quote
They aren't as grabby as Shimano where it can feel like a very on/off type setup.

I would say the Cura are very modulation friendly meaning I don't have to death grip the brake lever all the time. If I need to stop in a hurry I can grab the lever aggressively or I can firmly grab and apply increasing pressure.

I haven't ridden SRAM hydro brakes but I would say that the Cura is very much like Magura - lots of modulation - but smoother.

I prefer modulation and I have ridden Zee brakes which were great but I prefer the ability to modulate which to me seems more natural as I'm riding.

All of them will stop the bike just fine, the Cura give you the feel of options and finesse when you are riding which some people really like.

Posted: Sep 15, 2019 at 14:17 Quote
natekeegan wrote:
They aren't as grabby as Shimano where it can feel like a very on/off type setup.

I would say the Cura are very modulation friendly meaning I don't have to death grip the brake lever all the time. If I need to stop in a hurry I can grab the lever aggressively or I can firmly grab and apply increasing pressure.

I haven't ridden SRAM hydro brakes but I would say that the Cura is very much like Magura - lots of modulation - but smoother.

I prefer modulation and I have ridden Zee brakes which were great but I prefer the ability to modulate which to me seems more natural as I'm riding.

All of them will stop the bike just fine, the Cura give you the feel of options and finesse when you are riding which some people really like.

That sounds like theyre exactly what Im looking for then! Thanks, will definitely be picking some of these up soon

Posted: Sep 26, 2019 at 4:33 Quote
Heard the formula 2 is better

Posted: Sep 26, 2019 at 5:24 Quote
james-skipper wrote:
natekeegan wrote:
They aren't as grabby as Shimano where it can feel like a very on/off type setup.

I would say the Cura are very modulation friendly meaning I don't have to death grip the brake lever all the time. If I need to stop in a hurry I can grab the lever aggressively or I can firmly grab and apply increasing pressure.

I haven't ridden SRAM hydro brakes but I would say that the Cura is very much like Magura - lots of modulation - but smoother.

I prefer modulation and I have ridden Zee brakes which were great but I prefer the ability to modulate which to me seems more natural as I'm riding.

All of them will stop the bike just fine, the Cura give you the feel of options and finesse when you are riding which some people really like.

That sounds like theyre exactly what Im looking for then! Thanks, will definitely be picking some of these up soon
Just found this forum and want to give my feedback as there are absolutely no reviews out there for the cura 4s.
Bought a set last month and used them 1 weekend then removed, they certainly are not for me in terms of power. All i want is the most powerful brake out there and not bothered about cost, brands, modulation etc. These were muted as the most powerful around according to the marketing hype and looking at the piston size to master cylinder ratio i thought id give them a go. They are definitely well modulated and feel like a guide with a little more power, but one run down snowdon and i knew they were not the brake for me. Did a trail the same weekend and they were OK but certainly not what i expected and couldnt brake as late as i wanted to.
Modulation to me means lack of power, a grabby shimano brake to one person, is the ultimate stopper to another. You learn to modulate with your finger, not requiring the equipment to do it for you.
Currently running Shigura - Saint levers, MT7 calipers on 2mm thick disks.
Solved the shimano lever pump up problem by using extremely low viscosity fluid

Posted: Sep 26, 2019 at 5:52 Quote
yeti-monster wrote:
james-skipper wrote:
natekeegan wrote:
They aren't as grabby as Shimano where it can feel like a very on/off type setup.

I would say the Cura are very modulation friendly meaning I don't have to death grip the brake lever all the time. If I need to stop in a hurry I can grab the lever aggressively or I can firmly grab and apply increasing pressure.

I haven't ridden SRAM hydro brakes but I would say that the Cura is very much like Magura - lots of modulation - but smoother.

I prefer modulation and I have ridden Zee brakes which were great but I prefer the ability to modulate which to me seems more natural as I'm riding.

All of them will stop the bike just fine, the Cura give you the feel of options and finesse when you are riding which some people really like.

That sounds like theyre exactly what Im looking for then! Thanks, will definitely be picking some of these up soon
Just found this forum and want to give my feedback as there are absolutely no reviews out there for the cura 4s.
Bought a set last month and used them 1 weekend then removed, they certainly are not for me in terms of power. All i want is the most powerful brake out there and not bothered about cost, brands, modulation etc. These were muted as the most powerful around according to the marketing hype and looking at the piston size to master cylinder ratio i thought id give them a go. They are definitely well modulated and feel like a guide with a little more power, but one run down snowdon and i knew they were not the brake for me. Did a trail the same weekend and they were OK but certainly not what i expected and couldnt brake as late as i wanted to.
Modulation to me means lack of power, a grabby shimano brake to one person, is the ultimate stopper to another. You learn to modulate with your finger, not requiring the equipment to do it for you.
Currently running Shigura - Saint levers, MT7 calipers on 2mm thick disks.
Solved the shimano lever pump up problem by using extremely low viscosity fluid

What pads and disks are you using? Try sintered maybe.

Posted: Sep 26, 2019 at 7:58 Quote
yeti-monster wrote:
james-skipper wrote:
natekeegan wrote:
They aren't as grabby as Shimano where it can feel like a very on/off type setup.

I would say the Cura are very modulation friendly meaning I don't have to death grip the brake lever all the time. If I need to stop in a hurry I can grab the lever aggressively or I can firmly grab and apply increasing pressure.

I haven't ridden SRAM hydro brakes but I would say that the Cura is very much like Magura - lots of modulation - but smoother.

I prefer modulation and I have ridden Zee brakes which were great but I prefer the ability to modulate which to me seems more natural as I'm riding.

All of them will stop the bike just fine, the Cura give you the feel of options and finesse when you are riding which some people really like.

That sounds like theyre exactly what Im looking for then! Thanks, will definitely be picking some of these up soon
Just found this forum and want to give my feedback as there are absolutely no reviews out there for the cura 4s.
Bought a set last month and used them 1 weekend then removed, they certainly are not for me in terms of power. All i want is the most powerful brake out there and not bothered about cost, brands, modulation etc. These were muted as the most powerful around according to the marketing hype and looking at the piston size to master cylinder ratio i thought id give them a go. They are definitely well modulated and feel like a guide with a little more power, but one run down snowdon and i knew they were not the brake for me. Did a trail the same weekend and they were OK but certainly not what i expected and couldnt brake as late as i wanted to.
Modulation to me means lack of power, a grabby shimano brake to one person, is the ultimate stopper to another. You learn to modulate with your finger, not requiring the equipment to do it for you.
Currently running Shigura - Saint levers, MT7 calipers on 2mm thick disks.
Solved the shimano lever pump up problem by using extremely low viscosity fluid

After one run you made your mind up?? Brakes take a while to bed in. Pads.. rotor size.. rotors clean??

Posted: Sep 26, 2019 at 9:51 Quote
yeti-monster wrote:
james-skipper wrote:
natekeegan wrote:
They aren't as grabby as Shimano where it can feel like a very on/off type setup.

I would say the Cura are very modulation friendly meaning I don't have to death grip the brake lever all the time. If I need to stop in a hurry I can grab the lever aggressively or I can firmly grab and apply increasing pressure.

I haven't ridden SRAM hydro brakes but I would say that the Cura is very much like Magura - lots of modulation - but smoother.

I prefer modulation and I have ridden Zee brakes which were great but I prefer the ability to modulate which to me seems more natural as I'm riding.

All of them will stop the bike just fine, the Cura give you the feel of options and finesse when you are riding which some people really like.

That sounds like theyre exactly what Im looking for then! Thanks, will definitely be picking some of these up soon
Just found this forum and want to give my feedback as there are absolutely no reviews out there for the cura 4s.
Bought a set last month and used them 1 weekend then removed, they certainly are not for me in terms of power. All i want is the most powerful brake out there and not bothered about cost, brands, modulation etc. These were muted as the most powerful around according to the marketing hype and looking at the piston size to master cylinder ratio i thought id give them a go. They are definitely well modulated and feel like a guide with a little more power, but one run down snowdon and i knew they were not the brake for me. Did a trail the same weekend and they were OK but certainly not what i expected and couldnt brake as late as i wanted to.
Modulation to me means lack of power, a grabby shimano brake to one person, is the ultimate stopper to another. You learn to modulate with your finger, not requiring the equipment to do it for you.
Currently running Shigura - Saint levers, MT7 calipers on 2mm thick disks.
Solved the shimano lever pump up problem by using extremely low viscosity fluid

Trickstuff DRT levers with magura calipers.

Posted: Sep 26, 2019 at 9:55 Quote
I'm on the new XTRs - they are epic. Much less wander-y than my m8000 XTs were, lots of power, lots of feel, initial bite is very easy to modulate. Big recommend. Also, 3 year warranty.

Posted: Sep 26, 2019 at 12:35 Quote
Yes one use, I know my brakes.
Organic pads bedded in before heading out plus about 24km of trail. New 203/180 x 2mm disks IPA'd before use.
1100m of constant decent not enough to transfer brake material to disk?
Trying to save people their hard earned cash as there is nothing out there on these brakes

Posted: Oct 3, 2019 at 1:34 Quote
yeti-monster wrote:
Yes one use, I know my brakes.
Organic pads bedded in before heading out plus about 24km of trail. New 203/180 x 2mm disks IPA'd before use.
1100m of constant decent not enough to transfer brake material to disk?
Trying to save people their hard earned cash as there is nothing out there on these brakes

Thanks for info, I was thinking about buying them, well I still do, but same time curious about your Shigura configuration. What fluid are you using? You happy with this setup?


 
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