Tire damage near rim

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Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 0:01 Quote
I looking for advice on punctures appearing on my tired near the rim.

I ride tubeless Maxxis tires with 3XC Max Terra and EXO protection but I keep getting damage between the rim and the tire. I believe I currently have 2 holes that are plugged and there is another area with damage that looks like it can become a hole soon.

The tire is in good condition (DHR 2) and I'm sure whats the problem it. The damaged areas all appear to be about 1cm in length. No more.

What causes this? I'm not getting snake bites and he holes are only on the one side. My friend has said it just random maybe a rock etc but its happening a lot. ESP with the EXO protections. The hole that is forming look like its right on the rim, like its been rubbing.

Can any one provide suggestion on how to proceed form here? Do I need to get a new tired? It is a rim problem? Do I need extra protection like procore or core crush?

Thanks

Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 3:06 Quote
What is the size of your tires and the internal width of your rims? And pressure?

Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 5:51 Quote
If your sealant is plugging the holes, I wouldn’t worry about it. I go through rear tires much faster than fronts, and I think it is because you can steer (or wheelie) the front to avoid things but the rear doesn’t always follow the same line. My last rear got warped and started burping air out around the rim. I probably replace three rear tires to every one front.

Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 20:54 Quote
You are pinching the tire between the rim when you ride which is causing the issues. Good thing now you have options to mitigate these issues.
1. By far the cheapest, MOAR AIR
2. Thicker more sturdy casing tires which are often heavier and slower rolling
3. Inserts of some form. These don’t allow your tire to flatten as much in the event of a gnarly rim dinging impacts. There are also other benefits of inserts such as less pressure, more grip, less tire roll etc. But again as a cost of money and weight.

Hope this helps. I went through the same issue and moved up 2 levels of tire casing from exo to DH casing and so far so good.

Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 21:07 Quote
tricyclerider wrote:
You are pinching the tire between the rim when you ride which is causing the issues. Good thing now you have options to mitigate these issues.
1. By far the cheapest, MOAR AIR
2. Thicker more sturdy casing tires which are often heavier and slower rolling
3. Inserts of some form. These don’t allow your tire to flatten as much in the event of a gnarly rim dinging impacts. There are also other benefits of inserts such as less pressure, more grip, less tire roll etc. But again as a cost of money and weight.

Hope this helps. I went through the same issue and moved up 2 levels of tire casing from exo to DH casing and so far so good.

This is correct on all points. One thing to add: you may not have to step up all the way to DH casings, as those are super slow and heavy. If your trails aren't hard on your tires in any way other than pinching, look for tires with a bumper at the bead or a sidewall stiffening layer (a few brands call them "apex" reinforcements).

Vittoria make tires with light casings and small bumpers that cover the rim and not much else, leaving the sidewall light and supple:

Onza, Schwalbe, Continental, and probably others have models with extended bumpers to stiffen and reinforce the sidewalls (notice the rubber layer near the bead in the second from top model):
Onza s different rubber compound

Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 21:38 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
tricyclerider wrote:
You are pinching the tire between the rim when you ride which is causing the issues. Good thing now you have options to mitigate these issues.
1. By far the cheapest, MOAR AIR
2. Thicker more sturdy casing tires which are often heavier and slower rolling
3. Inserts of some form. These don’t allow your tire to flatten as much in the event of a gnarly rim dinging impacts. There are also other benefits of inserts such as less pressure, more grip, less tire roll etc. But again as a cost of money and weight.

Hope this helps. I went through the same issue and moved up 2 levels of tire casing from exo to DH casing and so far so good.

This is correct on all points. One thing to add: you may not have to step up all the way to DH casings, as those are super slow and heavy. If your trails aren't hard on your tires in any way other than pinching, look for tires with a bumper at the bead or a sidewall stiffening layer (a few brands call them "apex" reinforcements).

Vittoria make tires with light casings and small bumpers that cover the rim and not much else, leaving the sidewall light and supple:

Onza, Schwalbe, Continental, and probably others have models with extended bumpers to stiffen and reinforce the sidewalls (notice the rubber layer near the bead in the second from top model):
Onza s different rubber compound
Good call, E13 tires also do apex inserts if I am not mistaken and have a more or less similar design to a minion. I am notorious for trying a whole bunch of different things so they are next in line.

Posted: Mar 27, 2019 at 22:07 Quote
tricyclerider wrote:
Good call, E13 tires also do apex inserts if I am not mistaken and have a more or less similar design to a minion. I am notorious for trying a whole bunch of different things so they are next in line.

Keep in mind that companies like Onza, Terrene, e*thirteen, Surly, WTB, etc. don't have their own factories. In most cases, the rubber and casings are off-the-shelf items. In a few cases, the client can specify a combination of existing features that is not used by the factory's own-brand product lines. Rarely, the client commissions a proprietary feature.

e*thirteen and WTB have changed factories in the past year and are now being produced by the leading companies. Continental and Vittoria have made changes that should improve their products. Kenda and Vee are making renewed efforts to produce quality products. Hutchinson may finally update their products, driven by a couple of high-profile clients launching product lines. Michelin seems to be taking mountain bike tires (somewhat) seriously again. IRC and Panasonic (Panaracer) are making (weak) efforts to re-enter the off-road market. It's a good time for tires!

Posted: Mar 28, 2019 at 1:45 Quote
It depends on how old the tyres are too. Often, when tyres start to wear it’s the sidewalls rather than the tread that starts to go.

I agree with the comments above. If you’re riding in an area with lots of sharp rocks, an exo or equivalent casing probably isn’t going to cut it, especially as you start to ride faster.

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