Downhill or Enduro? I can't decide

PB Forum :: Downhill
Downhill or Enduro? I can't decide
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Message
Posted: May 13, 2019 at 20:48 Quote
I go to whistler 2 or 3 times a year, and sunpeaks might be on the table as well. I rented last year at whistler but there is a slim chance I will this year. My local trail is a crappy ride up, and I have walked up every time I've ridden there which was sometimes 4 days a week last summer. My friends usually walked up as well.

I'm fifteen and both me and my dads bike got stolen so we can't just drive out to washington for the day and ride like we used to (don't plan on buying 2 bikes) so I'll spend most of my time locally and have usually 5 or 6 days of whistler riding throughout the year. My local mountain is ledgeview, which mostly has narrow trails with a few little jumps and drops (I'm a pretty basic rider, I don't do the crazy stuff, and I'll be easing back from injury), there are a few youtube videos about it if anyone is interested, none of them are mine.

I was thinking more travel would cut a little slack on my injury.

Also, I've seen people ride hard tails at whistler (**edit - not me, but I've seen it) but my arms always hurt from break bumps if I've ridden a few days in a row.

I've been looking at bikes for months, gawking more or less, but I'm seriously looking now and just can't decide what would be best for me. Any responses would be appreciated, and I'll go into more detail if anyone asks. Thanks!

Posted: May 14, 2019 at 19:12 Quote
Speaking from experience when I was buying my first bike, as tempting as a dh bike is, an enduro bike will see much more use for anyone who rides beyond lift service. The ability to pedal is super important and the descending capabilities of a modern enduro are impressive

Posted: May 14, 2019 at 22:29 Quote
Definitely get the Enduro bike. They have evolved to become just as capable as downhill bikes on all but the most challenging trails (I'm talking like DH racing or Red Bull Rampage type stuff), which it doesn't sound like you are doing. A true downhill bike is gonna be a bitch to pedal at anything more than flat ground. I have a trail bike (150/140 F/R travel) and I will be taking it park riding as much as it sounds like you will be, and I don't feel as though I'll need something more aggressive (that could change after riding, but even then I wouldn't get a downhill bike). I work at a bike shop and I discourage people from buying downhill bikes unless A, it's staying at a downhill park lodge all the time, or B, they already have a trail or XC bike to use for other trails.

Bottom line: get an Enduro bike

Posted: May 15, 2019 at 17:13 Quote
Get a big enduro bike that can still pedal OK. They are practically as capable as freeride bikes like the 2015-2018 Voltage/Darkside, but much more versatile and maneuverable.

Then set it up with heavier, more rugged components so they can take a beating at Whistler. The frames can take the beating, it’s the components you need to worry about.

Giant Reign SX
Kona Process 165
Canyon Torque
Commencal Clash

Posted: May 16, 2019 at 4:10 Quote
BeaverCreaker wrote:
Get a big enduro bike that can still pedal OK. They are practically as capable as freeride bikes like the 2015-2018 Voltage/Darkside, but much more versatile and maneuverable.

Then set it up with heavier, more rugged components so they can take a beating at Whistler. The frames can take the beating, it’s the components you need to worry about.

Giant Reign SX
Kona Process 165
Canyon Torque
Commencal Clash

I did some googling about those bikes mentioned and they all seem to more pointed towards peddling and not downhill, could you recommend me something that is more towards downhill but can still peddle or does it honestly not matter at all and either one of those is a fine option?

The bike id end up with will essentially live at a bike park but i like having the ability to peddle if need be without regretting life choices. Also I'm 90 percent going used, the Kona's look like a good choice since there are plenty of them around and the 153 or should i not look at the 153. Id also like to stay closer to the budget end of the scale, I don't live next to a bike park so its only getting used a handful of trips a year its just that renting and figuring out a new bike all the time doesn't seem worth it to me.


There is a Kona Process 165 on here for 1400USD\2000CAD

there is also a divinci wilson xp http://2018.devinci.com/bikes/bike_719_scategory_187 for 2100 do either of those look like reasonable buys

Posted: May 16, 2019 at 8:02 Quote
bobosume wrote:
BeaverCreaker wrote:
Get a big enduro bike that can still pedal OK. They are practically as capable as freeride bikes like the 2015-2018 Voltage/Darkside, but much more versatile and maneuverable.

Then set it up with heavier, more rugged components so they can take a beating at Whistler. The frames can take the beating, it’s the components you need to worry about.

Giant Reign SX
Kona Process 165
Canyon Torque
Commencal Clash

I did some googling about those bikes mentioned and they all seem to more pointed towards peddling and not downhill, could you recommend me something that is more towards downhill but can still peddle or does it honestly not matter at all and either one of those is a fine option?

The bike id end up with will essentially live at a bike park but i like having the ability to peddle if need be without regretting life choices. Also I'm 90 percent going used, the Kona's look like a good choice since there are plenty of them around and the 153 or should i not look at the 153. Id also like to stay closer to the budget end of the scale, I don't live next to a bike park so its only getting used a handful of trips a year its just that renting and figuring out a new bike all the time doesn't seem worth it to me.


There is a Kona Process 165 on here for 1400USD\2000CAD

there is also a divinci wilson xp http://2018.devinci.com/bikes/bike_719_scategory_187 for 2100 do either of those look like reasonable buys

Where are you getting that information??? The Giant Reign SX is the worst pedalling Reign because it comes with a 180mm fork and coil shock, so great for DH

Posted: May 16, 2019 at 10:14 Quote
Maybe a Cube Hanz from chain reaction, or something similar. Or find a 2015-2018 Scott Voltage, but you'll be walking a lot with the voltage. What country are you in?

I have a 2019 Reign SX 2, and it's pretty damn fast on the downhill, but not nearly as fast or as confidence inspiring as a DH bike. It came set up with a 9 Spd dh drivetrain, 11-28 cassette, and it is not great for climbing. The frame climbs well, but the dh components (coil with no pedal platform, 180mm fork, DH wheelset) rob me of energy. And with the 28t big gear, it's like doing heavy lunges for 2 hours. I am adding 11 Spd XT this weekend, finally. Actually, Giant doesn't even offer the Glory this year in the US, so they turned the Reign SX 2 into their "park bike" for people needing that type of bike. It will pedal uphill, but you need to be strong and in shape.

In all honesty, if you are cool with walking your bike, nothing beats a DH bike. If I could only own one bike, it'd be my 2018 Gambler. Best bike I have ever ridden. I live next to a bike park, but during the offseason I walk the DH bikes up my local DH spots and it's totally worth it.

Watch some Jordan Boostmaster stuff. DH bikes are so good it's worth walking them up if you truly want or need that level of stability/confidence. Some people like that, you could be one of those people.

Posted: May 16, 2019 at 12:59 Quote
First off, the bikes Beaver Creaker recommended are as dh oriented as it gets without being a full on dh bike. I dunno who told you they weren´t, but it´s not true.
Except for that Cube Hanz, i´d stay away from Cube honestly Wink
Secondly, it´s simply not true a modern Enduro or even AM comes close to a dh bike when it comes to descending. It´s not even a competition. A dh bike will make things A LOT easier. It´ll be easier on your body, it´ll inspire more confidence in steep sections and it´ll last longer in most cases. People who claim otherwise are 90% really bad riders and the other 10% are really good riders. So the first mentioned won´t be able to even grasp what a dh bike can actually do, the other 10% don´t really care, they´ll make it work anyways.
People always assume others will do local laps no matter what, but there are people like me who have been exclusively riding dh for years and only recently acquired an enduro bike. Not everybody needs a trailbike.

That said, a dh bike imho is only of use under three circumstances.
1) It is a second bike. This way your allrounder gets spared the punishment of park riding and you can enjoy a dedicated bike in the park.
2) You are a dedicated downhill rider/racer and spend at least a decent amount of time in parks and on race tracks or your local mountain does justify pushing the dh bike uphill..
3) Funds are not an issue. Well, this is self explainatory. Dh bikes are fun. If you can, why not own one?

In your case i´m not sure. Seems like you´d not really miss the uphill capability of an enduro, but you probably won´t need the dh performance either, except for those few Whistler days.
I think something like the Torque or YT Capra would suit you just fine. It´s a healthy compromise between up and down with a strong emphasis on the downhill aspect.
If you can still get one or find a used one, the Commencal Supreme SX would fit you perfectly. 160mm travel with high pivot point for superb dh performance and still uphill capable. Basically a mini version of their WC DH machine.
Make sure there are some quality suspension components on the bike and those Whistler days should be no problem.

Posted: May 16, 2019 at 13:48 Quote
Loki87 wrote:
First off, the bikes Beaver Creaker recommended are as dh oriented as it gets without being a full on dh bike. I dunno who told you they weren´t, but it´s not true.
.

I feel lied to by my googling abilities and by some reviewers, the reviews I seen said those bikes pedal great. Thanks for the wake up call though.

The Torque is probably a no go for me since its imported only to America and id have to import it from there. Warranty and such would be too expensive and a pain.

The Capra and the supreme sound like they would fit pretty damn well but are on the extreme end of my budget.

If I were to just spend $2000-2500 on a dedicated DH bike would I get better performance downhill from it than the $4000 new enduro's? I ask because if I spend $4k on a bike its going to end up being my only mountain bike where if I only spend 2500ish or less I can keep my hardtail and its fine for around here, I was just trying to get the best of both worlds but if its as big of a compromise as your saying it will be I might as well do things right the first time.

Posted: May 16, 2019 at 14:03 Quote
bobosume wrote:
Loki87 wrote:
First off, the bikes Beaver Creaker recommended are as dh oriented as it gets without being a full on dh bike. I dunno who told you they weren´t, but it´s not true.
.

I feel lied to by my googling abilities and by some reviewers, the reviews I seen said those bikes pedal great. Thanks for the wake up call though.

The Torque is probably a no go for me since its based in American Dollars and id have to import it. Warranty and such would be too expensive and a pain.

The Capra and the supreme sound like they would fit pretty damn well but are on the extreme end of my budget.

If I were to just spend $2000 on a dedicated DH bike would I get better performance downhill from it than the $4000 enduro's? I ask because if I spend $4k on a bike its going to end up being my only mountain bike where if I only spend 2500ish or less I can keep my hardtail and its plenty for around here.


Well great pedaling doesn´t necessarily mean bad downhill capabilities Wink
Where exactly do you live? Canada or Europe i suppose?
The Torque is not only available in the US.

For 2000 you´d be certainly looking at the used market in both categories.

Posted: May 16, 2019 at 14:10 Quote
[Quote="Loki87"]
bobosume wrote:
Loki87 wrote:
First off, the bikes Beaver Creaker recommended are as dh oriented as it gets without being a full on dh bike. I dunno who told you they weren´t, but it´s not true.
.

Well great pedaling doesn´t necessarily mean bad downhill capabilities Wink
Where exactly do you live? Canada or Europe i suppose?
The Torque is not only available in the US.

For 2000 you´d be certainly looking at the used market in both categories.

I'm in Canada so for me from what i understand the torque would be coming from America, either way its not coming from Canada so warranty work would suck since our shipping rates are just through the roof. I was thinking more so a $2000 used DH bike vs a new $4000 enduro for DH only, if I go $2000-2500 used i can just keep my hard tail.

If you say DH bikes are that much better I figure I might as well go for one if I can make it work.

https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2549443/ seems to have reviewed decently from the few reviews I can find and the components seem worth it.

Posted: May 27, 2019 at 19:26 Quote
It sounds to me like pedaling is low down your priority list. I've got both a YT Capra and a Canyon Sender, the Capra is amazing downhill and can handle anything, that said nothing beats a dedicated downhill bike on the downs so if you're going to push up regardless get a downhill rig! Downhill bikes iron out the bumps a lot more as well so if you're worried about aggravating an injury that's worth baring in mind.

Posted: May 29, 2019 at 10:58 Quote
Honestly it depends on where you live and ride the most. If you live near Whistler, Duncan (Prevost), Mt Washington, Vernon etc. where there is either lift served or legit DH shuttling then go for it. If you live in the Fraser Valley and only own one bike there's no point in a DH. Pushing a 40lbs sled up a logging road is going to get old really fast especially when the trails are fine on an enduro bike.

Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:21 Quote
[Quote="bobosume"]
Loki87 wrote:
bobosume wrote:


Well great pedaling doesn´t necessarily mean bad downhill capabilities Wink
Where exactly do you live? Canada or Europe i suppose?
The Torque is not only available in the US.

For 2000 you´d be certainly looking at the used market in both categories.

I'm in Canada so for me from what i understand the torque would be coming from America, either way its not coming from Canada so warranty work would suck since our shipping rates are just through the roof. I was thinking more so a $2000 used DH bike vs a new $4000 enduro for DH only, if I go $2000-2500 used i can just keep my hard tail.

If you say DH bikes are that much better I figure I might as well go for one if I can make it work.

https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2549443/ seems to have reviewed decently from the few reviews I can find and the components seem worth it.

The Wilson is an awesome bike.
Just know it has some quirks with the whole linkage wishbone thing that causes me a lot of headache on mine right now.
It also runs really small.
I´m 1,80m and ride an XL. Wouldn´t want it any smaller. So i´d say the Large is for someone 1,70-175m

Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:36 Quote
Enduro - Great if you're using it for going to work..

DH - Perfect in every way, A real beast. The more effort you put in the more you get back Jailbreak

Previous Page | Next Page

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2022. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.007040
Mobile Version of Website