New to mountain biking

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Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 14:27 Quote
I am new to mountain biking ang don’t really want to spend a lot on my first bike but I don’t want a box store bike either. I would like a full suspension bike with a budget around $700. I have been talking to a few guys about bikes and they have told me to stay away from 26” wheel bikes. They say they are old technology and they are being phased out and there won’t be much as far as upgrades for them. What are your thoughts on the subject. Thanks.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 14:41 Quote
At a 700$ price point, 26" might be all that is available to you with dual suspension. (that said, I dont know what currency you are referring to, or what region you are in, as that will impact used bike pricing and availability)

26" wheels , rims and tires are always going to be available. There may be limits in their selection over time and newer manufacturing process, materials and tread designs are likely not going to be released in that wheel size. That said, the youth and recreational and used markets are going to keep replacement parts available for quite some time.

As far as "upgrades" go, thats not really a thing you need worry about. Aside from replacing broken or worn parts, the only upgrade you should be focused on is modern frame geometry, and that comes at a cost.

Get what you can afford, if you are hooked on the sport, save your pennies and then worry about modern, up gradable, performance options.

You can still have tones of fun on any and all trails with a 26" wheel bike. Wheel size alone should not be the limiting factor in your decision, particularly at that price point.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 14:45 Quote
Friend was in the same boat, went up to about $1100 and was able to get a decent bike. As said, $700 doesn't give you many options.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 14:51 Quote
In reality there's very little difference between the way a late model 26" and early model 27.5" bike rides. 26" tyres, forks and rims are all readily available. Your resale value would be affected, but so's the purchase price. You'll probably get a lot more for your money component wise.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 14:52 Quote
Scotth13 wrote:
I am new to mountain biking ang don’t really want to spend a lot on my first bike but I don’t want a box store bike either. I would like a full suspension bike with a budget around $700. I have been talking to a few guys about bikes and they have told me to stay away from 26” wheel bikes. They say they are old technology and they are being phased out and there won’t be much as far as upgrades for them. What are your thoughts on the subject. Thanks.
i bought my mountain bike for 650, and for that price i was able to get about a ten year old bike, 26" may be old tech but like any other size there are benefits, cornering and handling are very nimble with the 26, while the 29er may offer less rolling resistance and possibly more contact patch, this can be mimicked by changing the tire pressure to allow the tire to better grip and give less rolling resistance, i would say that you could probably build a bike for that price and be satisfied, pinkbike has plenty of options to build your own.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 15:02 Quote
Thanks for the replies and information. I have found several bikes that I like but I was just concerned about the tire size. I look forward to buying a bike and getting help and information from this site.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 17:31 Quote
I guess ya don't know what ya don't know. I still have my old superlight and try to ride it from time to time, but it is just so outdated. There has been so many advancements. I would find the latest model you could find. Tubeless is a big deal and I would want 10 speed at least. Just be careful so as to not need to spend a bunch after you buy to fix worn parts.

Example, I will be selling my son's 2016 Superlight with several new parts for $1000. Thru axles, tubeless, single up front, 10 speed, new tires, and susp serviced. Tough to find that type bike for $700. I did check it out well when I bought it and had to have the shock serviced by Fox, adding to my cost.

Patience pays off. Good luck.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 17:42 Quote
gmoss wrote:
I guess ya don't know what ya don't know. I still have my old superlight and try to ride it from time to time, but it is just so outdated. There has been so many advancements. I would find the latest model you could find. Tubeless is a big deal and I would want 10 speed at least. Just be careful so as to not need to spend a bunch after you buy to fix worn parts.

Example, I will be selling my son's 2016 Superlight with several new parts for $1000. Thru axles, tubeless, single up front, 10 speed, new tires, and susp serviced. Tough to find that type bike for $700. I did check it out well when I bought it and had to have the shock serviced by Fox, adding to my cost.

Patience pays off. Good luck.

Very valid point about worn parts, buying used (and cheap) can be a gamble if your not paying attention. Its always wise to set aside a few bucks to replacing consumable parts.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 19:59 Quote
If I were you I would get a hardtale. Seeing as your new to the sport a hardtale would be very beneficial to you in the long run. A hardtale teaches basic skills like line choice. In the long run you will be faster and crash less. I did it and have no regrets! Plus it’s cheeper and you could get an alright hardtale for that price point

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 23:49 Quote
I would start with a Hardtail as well. I started with a Giant Fathom 29er - 2019. A month later MTB consumed me and I needed a FS so I got a Jekyll 3 2018 27.5. Two months later? I just picked up a Santa Cruz Hightower LT 2019. It is addicting! Get help!

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 1:46 Quote
At that budget, as others have said, I’d go with a low end hardtail with modern geometry.

IMO modern geometry beats old fashioned geometry with full suspension every day of the week.

Also, with older bikes, getting parts is getting harder.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 7:45 Quote
BarneyStinson wrote:
IMO modern geometry beats old fashioned geometry.....

Also, with older bikes, getting parts is getting harder.

True story, you cant upgrade geometry.



What parts are you having a hard time replacing?

Aside from proprietary items, like linkages, some linkage bolts, and suspension components, there is absolutely no reason anyone should have a hard time sourcing parts for a bike of any age.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 8:08 Quote
sent you PM. check it out.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 12:54 Quote
Thanks guys for all the suggestions and information. I am now the proud owner of a 2015 Trek Fuel EX8. I will pick up the bike tomorrow. I look forward to getting started in this hobby and learning from this forum.

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