2019 Float X2 Tuning

PB Forum :: Mechanics' Lounge
2019 Float X2 Tuning
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Message
Posted: Jul 17, 2019 at 10:10 Quote
I have a 2019 Float x2 on a 2017 Bronson and have it pretty dialed in for parks. However, when I'm home on the local XCish trails its a little harsh. I am not really sure where to start, should I slow everything down since I'm typically going slower on trails?

Posted: Jul 19, 2019 at 7:29 Quote
thumper87 wrote:
I have a 2019 Float x2 on a 2017 Bronson and have it pretty dialed in for parks. However, when I'm home on the local XCish trails its a little harsh. I am not really sure where to start, should I slow everything down since I'm typically going slower on trails?

Are you running any volume spacers? Do you find yourself using all of your travel? FYI - even if you didn't put any in, my x2 came with 3 installed from the factory.

I would recommend running little to no spacers for more XC trails, paired with less sag (more air) than what you would run for a bike park. Consider 20-25% sag rather than the 30%+ recommended for DH trails.

This will give you a more linear curve, allowing you to use all of your suspension easier on mellower trails. Keeping a higher pressure/less sag will give you good pedaling performance, and introducing a more linear curve will allow the shock to soften up once it passes through about 50% of it's travel. If there are spacers in there, it's going to ramp up as you go through travel - you need this in the bike park, not so much on flat trails.

Posted: Jul 19, 2019 at 10:24 Quote
justinmariano wrote:
thumper87 wrote:
I have a 2019 Float x2 on a 2017 Bronson and have it pretty dialed in for parks. However, when I'm home on the local XCish trails its a little harsh. I am not really sure where to start, should I slow everything down since I'm typically going slower on trails?

Are you running any volume spacers? Do you find yourself using all of your travel? FYI - even if you didn't put any in, my x2 came with 3 installed from the factory.

I would recommend running little to no spacers for more XC trails, paired with less sag (more air) than what you would run for a bike park. Consider 20-25% sag rather than the 30%+ recommended for DH trails.

This will give you a more linear curve, allowing you to use all of your suspension easier on mellower trails. Keeping a higher pressure/less sag will give you good pedaling performance, and introducing a more linear curve will allow the shock to soften up once it passes through about 50% of it's travel. If there are spacers in there, it's going to ramp up as you go through travel - you need this in the bike park, not so much on flat trails.

I currently have two spacers installed. I am not using all my travel but come pretty close on every ride, one of the reason why I haven't removed any. If I add more air though this could prevent bottom out. The ramp up, as you explain it could be causing the harsh feeling though. Also, the trails I'm riding aren't typical XC trails I guess you could say. A lot have technical rock features, with some short DH runs and good climbs. I do consider them XC though compared to trails in NH and VT. I live in RI, and ride CT, MA a lot.

Posted: Jul 23, 2019 at 12:05 Quote
thumper87 wrote:
justinmariano wrote:
thumper87 wrote:
I have a 2019 Float x2 on a 2017 Bronson and have it pretty dialed in for parks. However, when I'm home on the local XCish trails its a little harsh. I am not really sure where to start, should I slow everything down since I'm typically going slower on trails?

Are you running any volume spacers? Do you find yourself using all of your travel? FYI - even if you didn't put any in, my x2 came with 3 installed from the factory.

I would recommend running little to no spacers for more XC trails, paired with less sag (more air) than what you would run for a bike park. Consider 20-25% sag rather than the 30%+ recommended for DH trails.

This will give you a more linear curve, allowing you to use all of your suspension easier on mellower trails. Keeping a higher pressure/less sag will give you good pedaling performance, and introducing a more linear curve will allow the shock to soften up once it passes through about 50% of it's travel. If there are spacers in there, it's going to ramp up as you go through travel - you need this in the bike park, not so much on flat trails.

I currently have two spacers installed. I am not using all my travel but come pretty close on every ride, one of the reason why I haven't removed any. If I add more air though this could prevent bottom out. The ramp up, as you explain it could be causing the harsh feeling though. Also, the trails I'm riding aren't typical XC trails I guess you could say. A lot have technical rock features, with some short DH runs and good climbs. I do consider them XC though compared to trails in NH and VT. I live in RI, and ride CT, MA a lot.

A single spacer might give you better all around performance in this case. Air up for trails, air down for park, could get more range without needing to open your shock.

Ramp up will feel harsh at slow speeds, but right at home when going faster/harder. You want the ramp there for things like big drops/jumps and riding over large features, but on a trail it will feel rough. When you begin to hit the progression of the shock, it will feel almost like it's bottomed out if there isn't enough force to use it.

Posted: Jul 24, 2019 at 7:40 Quote
justinmariano wrote:
thumper87 wrote:
justinmariano wrote:


Are you running any volume spacers? Do you find yourself using all of your travel? FYI - even if you didn't put any in, my x2 came with 3 installed from the factory.

I would recommend running little to no spacers for more XC trails, paired with less sag (more air) than what you would run for a bike park. Consider 20-25% sag rather than the 30%+ recommended for DH trails.

This will give you a more linear curve, allowing you to use all of your suspension easier on mellower trails. Keeping a higher pressure/less sag will give you good pedaling performance, and introducing a more linear curve will allow the shock to soften up once it passes through about 50% of it's travel. If there are spacers in there, it's going to ramp up as you go through travel - you need this in the bike park, not so much on flat trails.

I currently have two spacers installed. I am not using all my travel but come pretty close on every ride, one of the reason why I haven't removed any. If I add more air though this could prevent bottom out. The ramp up, as you explain it could be causing the harsh feeling though. Also, the trails I'm riding aren't typical XC trails I guess you could say. A lot have technical rock features, with some short DH runs and good climbs. I do consider them XC though compared to trails in NH and VT. I live in RI, and ride CT, MA a lot.

A single spacer might give you better all around performance in this case. Air up for trails, air down for park, could get more range without needing to open your shock.

Ramp up will feel harsh at slow speeds, but right at home when going faster/harder. You want the ramp there for things like big drops/jumps and riding over large features, but on a trail it will feel rough. When you begin to hit the progression of the shock, it will feel almost like it's bottomed out if there isn't enough force to use it.

I actually pulled a spacer out last week after reading your first post and I am currently running only 1 spacer. I then made a slight air pressure adjustment and added a couple clicks of HSC but ended up taking it off. It felt very good trail riding, like you said a little hard at slow speeds but once I sped up it felt good. Right now I'm running 185 psi LSR, 16 clicks, HSR: 15 clicks, LSC 19 clicks, and HSC 17 clicks. I may play around with the settings a little more but I think removing the spacer and adding air helped a lot.

Previous Page | Next Page

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.009984
Mobile Version of Website