Ripmo AF Thread

PB Forum :: Ibis
Ripmo AF Thread
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Posted: Jan 24, 2020 at 15:20 Quote
Explodo wrote:
schwaaa31 wrote:
Has anyone run theirs with 27.5”? I know it’s designed around 29. Just curious.

I ride a non-AF Ripmo, and I don't think you'd want to drop the BB any lower than it already is. I'm crushing pedals on rocks more than I ever have.

Yes tbf that is an Ibis trademark lol

Hence partly why they handle well

Rocky places means pedal bashing and the main reason I sold a practically mint Mojo

Posted: Jan 24, 2020 at 16:00 Quote
Ibis BB heights are almost precisely industry-average. All models are within a few millmeters.

Dave Weagle tends to favour light low-speed compression damping tunes for his bikes, so it's possible Ibis bikes dip a little lower as they pass through trail undulations.

Posted: Jan 25, 2020 at 7:32 Quote
Strange comparison, but has anyone ridden the Ripmo AF and a new Norco Optic? Both bikes seem to be getting great reviews but I can't figure out which side of the coin I want to be on: handles the bigger stuff well for a small travel bike or does everything pretty well for a bigger travel bike. I've always been the type to prefer more travel for an occasional bike park or rowdier trail day but could definitely get away with a small travel bike for most of my riding. Unfortunately, neither brand has a dealer close to me and it's winter here in NY.

Posted: Jan 25, 2020 at 8:02 Quote
Havent ridden the norco but I cant imagine any horst link bike will ever compete with DW link bike in terms of making you ride better than you are haha

Posted: Jan 25, 2020 at 12:28 Quote
cmb47 wrote:
Strange comparison, but has anyone ridden the Ripmo AF and a new Norco Optic? Both bikes seem to be getting great reviews but I can't figure out which side of the coin I want to be on: handles the bigger stuff well for a small travel bike or does everything pretty well for a bigger travel bike. I've always been the type to prefer more travel for an occasional bike park or rowdier trail day but could definitely get away with a small travel bike for most of my riding. Unfortunately, neither brand has a dealer close to me and it's winter here in NY.

Cross shopping both bikes (Ripmo AF & Optic) for myself as well, and a Stumpjumper Evo. Interested to see people opinions.

Posted: Jan 26, 2020 at 8:34 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Ibis BB heights are almost precisely industry-average. All models are within a few millmeters.

Dave Weagle tends to favour light low-speed compression damping tunes for his bikes, so it's possible Ibis bikes dip a little lower as they pass through trail undulations.

Ahhhh yes tis true too

Posted: Feb 2, 2020 at 12:03 Quote
Had my Ripmo AF for a few weeks now. Nx build, Topaz air. Large. I am 5-11, 220lbs. Riding for 30 years. (?!?!) Wow I am old. An unsually warm January here in MT has let me get out the last 3 weekends on the trail.

Anyway, I wanted the Schwalbe tires but they weren't in stock so I got the EXO+ Assegais. First two rides I was bummed. It seemed super slow and lethargic. It was the tires. They are slow and heavy as hell. Swapped out for EXO casing DHF and Rekon and now it seems to pedal like I would expect and feels much more lively. We have a shitload of climbing in MT and having a slightly faster rolling tire is a big help. Most trails I am on aren't super chunky so I do ok on lighter casings.

The climbing is really the standout to me. The steep seat angle is amazing. New school geometry is legit. It's confusing on the fit at first. Seat to bars distance is 1.5" shorter than my old Tallboy, but it climbs better with less leaning forward required on steeper stuff. Just less body english required which is strangely relaxing.
Tech climbing is so much easier on this setup. This was a big surprise. Uphill tight switchbacks are actually easier since my weight is more forward, easier to balance at slow speed, even though the bike is like 4" longer.

Downhill it feels so stable, super smooth, and super fun. Easy to pop off stuff by preloading. Short chainstays keep it lively, and fun. It is SO EASY to ride fast.

Rear shock/suspension: So nice so smooth. DVO Topaz is different than past air shocks I have used. I feel like somewhere in the mid 2000’s rear shocks started to have excessive damping, and even full open shocks were not fun, not poppy, not active enough. This shock is so active, it’s amazingly plush and quick to react. I am wondering if the seal friction is much lower than a comparable fox. That being said, there is more bob than I would like while climbing. I am heavier than the median rider weight these things are designed for, so it’s possible lighter riders may not have this problem. Had the recommended 230 psi in there at first. Upped it to 250psi yesterday. Helped a little. My expectation is zero shock movement, but clearly that isn’t happening. It's not a lot, less than 5mm movement I would say. Even with the comp switch closed. In the end the bobbing is overshadowed by how great the shock is on the downhill.

Fork: at first with 135 psi recommended I felt like it was a bit stiff. Even with the OTT all the way out. Last ride I rechecked the sag and dropped to 110psi for 40mm sag. This changed the feel bigtime. Much more plush, but with the OTT at recommended turns, it is supported and not divey under braking. Starting to feel really good now. Still haven't reached full travel, but the trails I am on aren't that fast or chunky.

Summary: this bike is REALLY good. Wish i had one sooner. Best bang for the buck no question. Reminds me of the Santa Cruz Bullitt, built to shred, can pedal, sturdy, cheap, and awesome.

Posted: Feb 2, 2020 at 12:48 Quote
The Assegais do feel a little clunky but the grip is amazing. You can defiantly feel them when pedaling but it’s just preference if you want more security on the downhill or want to make the climbs easier.
I am in Idaho and probably similar terrain to you in MT. I can easily get away with EXO casings here, you don’t even see DD casings in shops because it’s generally overkill for our terrain.
Last season I went very conservative on tires just to know what the opposite end of the spectrum was like and ran a Crossmax in the rear and a Rekon in the front. Huge difference in the climbing, started killing PR’s on climbs but also could get a little sketchy on fast and loose descents. I have now settled on a assegai front and aggressor rear in 2.5 and like it quite a bit.

Posted: Feb 2, 2020 at 14:23 Quote
I’m 5’8” 200lbs on a medium with the same topaz and no bobbing. Did you make sure the bladder is filled almost to max?

Posted: Feb 3, 2020 at 10:47 Quote
Kmccann137 wrote:
I’m 5’8” 200lbs on a medium with the same topaz and no bobbing. Did you make sure the bladder is filled almost to max?

yes 200psi in bladder. I am going to deflate the shock entirely and start from zero and pressurize according to DVO instructions and see what happens. Maybe it didn't get cycled when the shop set it up. They did a few other questionable things so I wouldn't be surprised.

Posted: Feb 3, 2020 at 10:51 Quote
What did everyone in the US end up paying for their Ripmo AF? Speaking to a few dealers, curious how much wiggle room people have found.

Posted: Feb 3, 2020 at 11:00 Quote
The "less than 5mm movement" you're experiencing shouldn't be concerning. No bike will be perfectly stable for all riders in all sprocket combinations.

As you noted, the climb switch fixes the problem. That's why it exists. When a convenient option to stop the bobbing exists, it's better to have an open setting that's "too" open, rather than having a system that can never move freely.

Ironically, the reduction of static friction, which we all claim to want, makes a bike more prone to bobbing, so you can be thankful for it. Your "problem" is what we strive for.

Some ideas, if you still want to pursue this:

1. Smaller chainring. This will increase the pedaling anti-squat.
2. Work on your biomechanics. It's possible you're feeling squat from chain tension, which is the usual cause of bobbing, but it's also possible you're feeling a quick dip from unstable biomechanics as your legs pass through the 12 o'clock & 6 o'clock positions.
3. Get the shock tuned with firmer damping, especially low-speed compression. Dave Weagle and Ibis are both fans of light damping, so there's probably a lot less damping than most bikes have, especially for a heavier rider.

Posted: Feb 3, 2020 at 16:06 Quote
I have 265 in the bladder...fill that thing up!

Posted: Feb 3, 2020 at 16:40 Quote
Never heard anyone over pressurize their bladder.. is this safe and is a lot of you doing it?

Posted: Feb 3, 2020 at 17:14 Quote
Sorry my mistake I just checked 200 in bladder


 
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