Ripmo AF Thread

PB Forum :: Ibis
Ripmo AF Thread
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Posted: Dec 4, 2019 at 2:18 Quote
Last week Thursday after a delay of almost 2 months I received my NX Large Ripmo with an upgrade of a Bike Yoke revive since I had the option back then for an extra 80Euros.
Bike is MENTAL. Coming from DH Racing and I hoped that this bike could everything. So yeah , this bike can do anything pretty much. Really like everything on the bike , minus that its a little bit on the heavy side but oh well , by the time I cant really feel its wait while pedaling or riding , I don't really care. Thought I had to change the brakes but surprisingly the guide t's power and feeling is spot on. Don't really like the lever design and the absence of adjustability but who cares at the end. Changed the rear assegai for a dhr 2 exo tr to be able to pedal more efficiently and I swapped the 40mm stem with a renthal apex 50mm since I felt a little bit cramped when I was pedaling. I guess it has to do with the shitty handlebar and that 9 degress of backsweep. What they were thinking?

Anyway. Bike is out of this world....

Posted: Dec 4, 2019 at 3:34 Quote
Wow - was not expecting such well taken with class content pics

Topjob ! ;-)

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 13:52 Quote
Hey just got my ripmo AF and am loving it. Was wondering how everyone has their topaz set up? Bladder pressure? How many spacers for positive and negative chambers?

Thanks

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 14:08 Quote
Arupe40 wrote:
Hey just got my ripmo AF and am loving it. Was wondering how everyone has their topaz set up? Bladder pressure? How many spacers for positive and negative chambers?

Thanks


I've had a Topaz, just not on the Ripmo AF.

• Bladder pressure makes little difference, but everyone I know with a Topaz has to reinflate the expansion chamber between weekly and monthly, so check it frequently.
• There's rarely a case where negative chamber spacers improve performance. You'll probably want full volume.
• The compression damping is fairly light, the motion ratio is moderately progressive, and the motion ratio is most supportive in the midstroke. Unlike many bikes, the Ripmo AF can ride well with a wide range of spring curves. If you like the bike to sit high with a firm and "poppy" feel, run less sag and zero reducers. If you like to feel glued to the trail, run more sag and put in a couple spacers.

Posted: Dec 16, 2019 at 8:54 Quote
Arupe40 wrote:
Hey just got my ripmo AF and am loving it. Was wondering how everyone has their topaz set up? Bladder pressure? How many spacers for positive and negative chambers?

Thanks

Loving it too since day one. Epic bike. I followed ibis's setting recommendations that has on the manual , and didn't touch the volume spacers at all. Pretty happy about the result. Remember to check and inflate the bladder pressure before you do anything else.

Enjoy the bike.

Posted: Dec 18, 2019 at 20:56 Quote
I am looking at getting this bike as my first MTB. I am doing a demo as soon as our trails dry out. Do you think the coil is worth the extra $100. I have been trying to read about the difference but it usually boils down to "it depends"

I would hate to miss a worthwhile upgrade over $100

Posted: Dec 18, 2019 at 21:58 Quote
jwashburn wrote:
I am looking at getting this bike as my first MTB. I am doing a demo as soon as our trails dry out. Do you think the coil is worth the extra $100. I have been trying to read about the difference but it usually boils down to "it depends"

I would hate to miss a worthwhile upgrade over $100

For some bikes, the motion ratio is distinctly better suited to one spring type or the other - even if the manufacturer says otherwise (they wouldn't want to turn away a potential customer!). In the case of the Ripmo AF, Ibis is correct that the motion ratio suits either a coil or air shock.

Characteristics of the coil:

• Heavier. Weight is the most over-rated thing is all of cycling, though.
• Less stiction, i.e. smoother movement.
• Linear spring rate, which gives more "midstroke" support and less bottom-out resistance, compared to an air shock with the same amount of sag.
• Can be a hassle to get the ideal spring, since you can't just adjust the air pressure to tune it.
• Never need to top up air pressure for the main spring, though you do need to top up the air in DVO's compensation chamber (the bladder).
• I'm unsure whether the Topaz and Jade X have the same shaft diameter and damper. The Jade X may move more oil, which usually allows for better damper performance.

My recommendation: call DVO and ask whether the Topaz and Jade X have exactly the same damper or the Jade X has a little higher performing damper. If it's the latter, I'd go with the Jade X; if they're the same ... maybe I'd go with the Topaz for ease of tuning and a less weight (even though I think weight is trivial). Let us know what you find out about the dampers!

Posted: Dec 19, 2019 at 5:46 Quote
Top answer above & that personally I would opt for a coil jade x shock

Posted: Dec 30, 2019 at 10:55 Quote
Anybody with one of these around 6'2" (188 cm)? Coming off of an bike with a 435 mm reach no have no frame of reference on size. Definitely more of a finesse rider than one that just likes to plow through stuff. Trying to be in the air as much as possible on the trail and plan to spend a bunch of weekends in the bike park. I have a relatively long torso and shorter legs.

Posted: Dec 30, 2019 at 11:43 Quote
jpculp wrote:
Anybody with one of these around 6'2" (188 cm)? Coming off of an bike with a 435 mm reach no have no frame of reference on size. Definitely more of a finesse rider than one that just likes to plow through stuff. Trying to be in the air as much as possible on the trail and plan to spend a bunch of weekends in the bike park. I have a relatively long torso and shorter legs.

I am pretty similar in build to you it sounds like and I came from a XL Jeffsy, I have a Carbon Ripmo but reach is pretty similar. The Ripmo reach is longer but feels shorter, I don’t know why. My XL Jeffsy felt long sometimes, but have never felt that way on the Ripmo, it actually feel much more compact. I couldn’t imagine riding a smaller size than XL.

Do you have a dealer nearby?

Posted: Dec 30, 2019 at 11:59 Quote
I’m 6’2 on a xl Ripmo. I wouldn’t want it any smaller.

Posted: Dec 30, 2019 at 12:00 Quote
I have one about 2 hours away I was planning on buying from. Sounds like an XL might be the way to go if it feels shorter than an xl jeffsy, thanks for the advice.

Posted: Dec 30, 2019 at 18:59 Quote
Branmuffin wrote:
I am pretty similar in build to you it sounds like and I came from a XL Jeffsy, I have a Carbon Ripmo but reach is pretty similar. The Ripmo reach is longer but feels shorter, I don’t know why. My XL Jeffsy felt long sometimes, but have never felt that way on the Ripmo, it actually feel much more compact. I couldn’t imagine riding a smaller size than XL.

Which Jeffsy: current carbon or current aluminum / previous carbon? If it's the current carbon, then the Ripmo and Jeffsy have similar sizing. If it's the previous generation, then the Ripmo has longer reach, but the Jeffsy has a slacker seat-tube angle, which could create a longer butt-to-bar distance.

To compare sizes, something has to be kept constant and the seat-tube angle is the best baseline. If the seat is moved fore/aft on the rails until your hips are in the same position, relative to the BB, a bike with longer reach will always feel longer.

NOTE: I'm referring to normalized reach, measured at a constant stack height, rather than spec sheet reach, which is heavily influenced by stack height.


 
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