Ripmo AF Thread

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Ripmo AF Thread
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Posted: Jan 10, 2020 at 12:16 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
To be fair, I should note that some air shocks are very different from coils. In the days of the RockShox Monarch and pre-Evol Fox, air shocks typically had less advanced dampers and crazy spring curves. Totally different feel from a coil, but because of the design of the shock, not intrinsic properties of air and coil springs.

The new air shocks are so much better that I agree with you: there's often little reason to use a coil shock. Not because we don't need the different properties of a coil, but because the properties are (sometimes) so similar.

And yes, I've found the same thing about diminished interest in DH bikes. My pedalable bike is similar to the Ripmo AF and a trail has to be pretty rowdy before the DH bike is significantly better. Both our bikes are above-average on pedaling efficiency, so the range of trails on which they're an ideal tool for the job has expanded to cover almost all terrain I would want to ride. The only downside is that less-challenging trails have become a real snooze.

Several years ago, I felt the ideal two bike quiver was an overforked trail bike and a downhill bike. Now it may be an enduro bike and a cross-country racer with a little extra capability - "downcountry", if we're going to accept the term, but racier than most of the bikes in this year's Pinkbike group test. I could - and do - live quite happily without the downcountry bike. The current jack-of-all-trades bike is nearly a master of them all!


This DVO suspension also is so damn good. It basically feels like my dh fork off the top and a trail fork in the midstroke and an enduro fork on the high speed compression. The fact that Ibis worked directly with DVO to tune the Topaz has resulted in an unbelievable feeling air shock. I am going to be spending the foreseeable future finding a limit to this bike. I feel like I need to buy two of them because I can't imagine anything better other than some small tweaks like ISCG tabs and better cable routing. I definitely don't want a smaller travel version.

Posted: Jan 10, 2020 at 12:23 Quote
The DVO suspension is really what pushes this bike to be such a great performance/cost ratio. Nearly 50% of the bikes value is in suspension alone, I really still can’t believe they pulled off the 3k price point for the NX build.

Competitors would spec a 34 Rhythm and a Fox Dps which is light years behind the Diamond/Topaz.

Posted: Jan 10, 2020 at 14:00 Quote
Branmuffin wrote:
I really still can’t believe they pulled off the 3k price point for the NX build.

For a bike shop bike, no less. Imagine how reasonable it would be if it was a direct sale. Either way, it proves what I've been saying for ages: better geometry and kinematics don't cost more to manufacture.

Posted: Jan 10, 2020 at 19:36 Quote
I'm coming off an OG Hightower and looking at the new Jeffsy and the Ripmo AF. I'm 5'7" and riding a medium. I'm ready to embrace the geometry of a new bike but am worried about the wheelbase going from 1165mm to 1200(Jeffsy)/1216(RipmoAF). I live and ride out west in Utah and the southwest. This will be my only bike for the foreseeable future so will have to pull double duty for normal trail rides as well as days at the park and doing enduro races (not competitively but more for fun and to push myself).

Has anyone made a similar change and/or ever feel like the longer bike is a negative?

Posted: Jan 10, 2020 at 21:22 Quote
I went from 1170 mm to over 1270 mm. Super tight switchbacks are a little more of a hassle, but I hate those anyway and I'm fine continuing to hate them. As an example, there are switchbacks I used to clean maybe 75% of the time that are now 25%.

Wouldn't want to compromise the rest of the ride - the parts I actually like - to avoid a few uphill dabs or foot-plant turns. Everything else is much better with the longer bike.

Posted: Jan 11, 2020 at 5:40 Quote
NateMob wrote:
I'm coming off an OG Hightower and looking at the new Jeffsy and the Ripmo AF. I'm 5'7" and riding a medium. I'm ready to embrace the geometry of a new bike but am worried about the wheelbase going from 1165mm to 1200(Jeffsy)/1216(RipmoAF). I live and ride out west in Utah and the southwest. This will be my only bike for the foreseeable future so will have to pull double duty for normal trail rides as well as days at the park and doing enduro races (not competitively but more for fun and to push myself).

Has anyone made a similar change and/or ever feel like the longer bike is a negative?

I basically am the same height and did the same thing. At first it was not fun with the longer bike but actually I cut my bars down 20mm and switched to lighter tires for mellow trails and now I don’t even notice it and maybe it even turns better than my old bike.

Posted: Jan 11, 2020 at 9:40 Quote
Ordered one last week. First new bike in a number of years (2014). I demoed a Ripmo carbon this summer on east coast tech and I could tell that back on my home trails in Montana it would be a weapon. The fastest DH there is like the slowest DH here. Steep seat angle is a game changer for climbing. And I was amazed at how good it pedaled for that much travel. Glad to be getting current geo, and to going back to a metal frame. I called DVO to ask about service costs etc and the guy on the phone was super knowledgeable . And their rebuild costs are somewhat cheaper than Fox which is a plus. And i believe Stans is making the wheels for ibis so they should be decent. After 30 years (!?!) of mtn biking this is the bike I want: affordable, durable, downhill biased, with high end boingers on it. No precious carbon that needs to be babied. I can throw this thing in the back of the truck and not worry about it. They are going to sell the shit out of these, and I think this bike is really going to shake up the market. Not to mention put Ibis sales numbers through the roof with a lower price point offering. The BIKE mag review said it best "it's like this bike was built by the Pinkbike comments section... " LOL. Can't wait to go for a rip!

Posted: Jan 11, 2020 at 14:46 Quote
Buy a couple sockets and some oil and do the DVO services yourself. Diamond and topaz are very easy to work on and DVO has good step by step guides.

I serviced my Diamond many times, takes around an hour and will not void warranty. Buy a couple set of seals at a time as they seem to go out of stock occasionally.

Posted: Jan 12, 2020 at 4:25 Quote
NateMob wrote:
I'm coming off an OG Hightower and looking at the new Jeffsy and the Ripmo AF. I'm 5'7" and riding a medium. I'm ready to embrace the geometry of a new bike but am worried about the wheelbase going from 1165mm to 1200(Jeffsy)/1216(RipmoAF). I live and ride out west in Utah and the southwest. This will be my only bike for the foreseeable future so will have to pull double duty for normal trail rides as well as days at the park and doing enduro races (not competitively but more for fun and to push myself).

Has anyone made a similar change and/or ever feel like the longer bike is a negative?

I came from a AL Jeffsy that had about a 45mm shorter wheelbase than my carbon Ripmo and I have noticed 0 negatives on the cornering or longer wheelbase. High speed berms it rails even harder, slow sleep climbing it handles much better also but I was running a 51mm offset fork on my Jeffsy which made the front wheel a bit floppy on slow technical climbing.

Posted: Jan 12, 2020 at 15:09 Quote
I have the coil version, and I am very happy with it. As a HUGE fan of DVO on 2 previous bikes, I think anyone would enjoy the Topaz and diamond, but the coil has a ride quality that I hadn't experienced before. I could talk about the Topaz's technology forever and how I love it, but the coil shock surprised me!

I was not expecting it to climb well. I was reserved in expecting a "bobbing" effort on the way up (because of the coil), but that was not true. From everything that I've read, this is a quality of how Ibis uses the DW link. The lockout switch is not needed. I'm a mid-40's slightly overweight guy who rides 2-3 times/week, and this bike has gone on my biggest rides recently. It does not leave me wishing that I grabbed my lighter bike.

Frankly, it has allowed me to take features smoothly that I've never tried before. I can't say that the coil was a determining factor, but it had to help when attempting a boulder pile ending in a large drop (I've only seen one person complete this feature and their back tire exploded on impact). This bike has my back.

Of all of the bikes that I've ridden, I'd say it feels closest to the Rocky Mountain Altitude 27.5. But it climbs MUCH better! ... And it's a 29'er.

I have noticed the same thing that sourdiesel noticed - that there is a squirmy feeling on big bottom outs, but I've only felt that when landing on off camber sections. Having said that, I was actually looking for a bike with flex (my other bike is pretty stiff) that I can beat the piss out of. This bike seems to be it.

Modern geometry is amazing, DVO is amazing, and bringing "affordable" brilliant bikes to the market is something that the industry and the sport needed. What a great time to be alive!

Posted: Jan 12, 2020 at 15:44 Quote
Csposi wrote:
I have the coil version, and I am very happy with it. As a HUGE fan of DVO on 2 previous bikes, I think anyone would enjoy the Topaz and diamond, but the coil has a ride quality that I hadn't experienced before. I could talk about the Topaz's technology forever and how I love it, but the coil shock surprised me!

I was not expecting it to climb well. I was reserved in expecting a "bobbing" effort on the way up (because of the coil), but that was not true. From everything that I've read, this is a quality of how Ibis uses the DW link. The lockout switch is not needed. I'm a mid-40's slightly overweight guy who rides 2-3 times/week, and this bike has gone on my biggest rides recently. It does not leave me wishing that I grabbed my lighter bike.

Frankly, it has allowed me to take features smoothly that I've never tried before. I can't say that the coil was a determining factor, but it had to help when attempting a boulder pile ending in a large drop (I've only seen one person complete this feature and their back tire exploded on impact). This bike has my back.

Of all of the bikes that I've ridden, I'd say it feels closest to the Rocky Mountain Altitude 27.5. But it climbs MUCH better! ... And it's a 29'er.

I have noticed the same thing that sourdiesel noticed - that there is a squirmy feeling on big bottom outs, but I've only felt that when landing on off camber sections. Having said that, I was actually looking for a bike with flex (my other bike is pretty stiff) that I can beat the piss out of. This bike seems to be it.

Modern geometry is amazing, DVO is amazing, and bringing "affordable" brilliant bikes to the market is something that the industry and the sport needed. What a great time to be alive!

Jeff Kendall-Weed has a YouTube review of the Ripmo AF, and he does mention the flex in the rear end when landing off camber or something to that extent. Pretty good review and seems pretty honest for a current or former Ibis sponsored rider. He didn’t seem to think the flex was a big deal.

Posted: Jan 12, 2020 at 15:55 Quote
[Quote="Branmuffin"]
Csposi wrote:

Jeff Kendall-Weed has a YouTube review of the Ripmo AF, and he does mention the flex in the rear end when landing off camber or something to that extent. Pretty good review and seems pretty honest for a current or former Ibis sponsored rider. He didn’t seem to think the flex was a big deal.

I'm no Kendall-Weed, but I agree!

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