How Important is tire weight for climbing?

PB Forum :: All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country
How Important is tire weight for climbing?
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Posted: Sep 22, 2019 at 9:55 Quote
I am getting back into MTBing after taking a 5 year break. I use to ride strictly Downhill. I recently purchased an all mountain bike and I have the Asegai folding tires (1000 grams) and was wondering if that is pretty standard for climbing or if I should go down to a lighter tire closer to 800 grams? Just wondering how I can make life any easier on these climbs or just grunt it out and let the fitness catch up?

Current setup is a 32 lb bike with Carbon Reserve wheels and running tubless.

Posted: Sep 22, 2019 at 10:22 Quote
If you used to ride strictly downhill, and still feel really stoked about going downhill. I would recommend sticking to a heavier casing or light casing with inserts and just get stronger Wink

Posted: Sep 22, 2019 at 11:09 Quote
ass-guy's are pretty aggressive and not as fast rolling as an Aggressor or a Rekon (if you're staying in the Maxxis family); a lighter tire will make the bike feel a little easier to accelerate, but you'll be giving up a tougher casing to get there - that doesn't matter to me because I'm light and easy on gear, but if you're big and/or aggressive, the extra weight might be worth the tradeoff for the durability.

What some people will do is run that beefy tread pattern up front, like an Assegai or a Minion, and then that faster rolling Aggressor/Rekon in the rear, to get a best of both worlds situation. It'll depend on your terrain and how you ride.

Posted: Sep 22, 2019 at 18:06 Quote
Just get stronger! Lighter tires are fine for smoother terrain, but if you have pointy rocks you want stronger casings

Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 21:03 Quote
It's less about weight than rolling resistance, though weight is often a reasonable estimator of rolling resistance.

As others have mentioned, light tend to live fast and die young. Not very durable. And burly tires are a lot of fun.

You could try a tire with minimal tread in the rear, like a Specialized Slaughter, but the gain in speed is modest. If your tires have the EXO or EXO+ casing, they're already a good balance of speed and marginally acceptable durability. Less casing durability is playing with fire and less tread may be a buzzkill.

Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 22:13 Quote
joelsman wrote:
Just get stronger! Lighter tires are fine for smoother terrain, but if you have pointy rocks you want stronger casings

This exactly

Posted: Sep 24, 2019 at 6:52 Quote
Heavier casings straight up perform better too, as long as the trail is chundery. Doesnt mattter on smooth trails.

Posted: Sep 24, 2019 at 11:13 Quote
Thanks everyone. I have decided to just get stronger and power through being a wimp and keep the exo casing tires.

Posted: Sep 24, 2019 at 18:20 Quote
bfreemedia wrote:
Thanks everyone. I have decided to just get stronger and power through being a wimp and keep the exo casing tires.

Then, when you get properly fast, you'll have to upgrade to Double Down casings and start the cycle all over again!

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