Downhill or enduro bike?

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Downhill or enduro bike?
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Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 8:01 Quote
Hi. I have an enduro bike. Cube fritzz 2017. It has 180mm of travel. I ride a lot of parks and sometimes enduro trails. In park i feel like my bike cant handle it. I ride pretty hard and i fell like my bike would fall apart. I was thinking of buying a downhill bike and i know i cant ride trails with it. I cant decide which bike should i get? I dont have money for two bikes.

Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 12:03 Quote
You've kinda aswered your own question in terms of downhill or Enduro.

There's hell of lot of folk on this forum who seem to struggle with the
decision proccess, wonder if there's a pastry pie forum, and if they have similar
topics of what should I get as I can't decide between the cheesy crust or the
steak filled, one is 85p and the other is 95p please help Smile

Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 13:54 Quote
Dunno about the Fritz but Cube bikes including the Two15 don't seem to have the best reputation for feel and build quality. What about another 170-180mm park/enduro bike like the Commencal Clash, YT Capra, Rocky Mountain Slayer etc.

Also are you using downhill casing tires, 4 piston brakes and a DH level shock? Those things make a big difference in the park.

Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 18:39 Quote
gramboh wrote:
Dunno about the Fritz but Cube bikes including the Two15 don't seem to have the best reputation for feel and build quality. What about another 170-180mm park/enduro bike like the Commencal Clash, YT Capra, Rocky Mountain Slayer etc.

Also are you using downhill casing tires, 4 piston brakes and a DH level shock? Those things make a big difference in the park.

As gramboh said:

Cube bikes are not having the best reputation for feel and build quality.

Get a decent bike to start with.
Commencal Clash, YT Capra, Scott Voltage, etc. Get one with a Fox 36 (180mm)
Once you got your new or other enduro bike I suggest the following upgrades for the perfect bikepark bike.

1. Get a Mojo Rising MORC 36 dual-crown conversion kit. With this kit you can easily convert your single crown fork to a dual crown, and convert it back to single crown again. Super kit!!
2. Get 4 piston brakes
3. Get DH level shock
4. Get DH tires.

That is your perfect bike. You can run single crown when you want to go ride enduro / trails, and when you go to the bikepark just convert your single crown to dual crown. This will give you the stiffness from dual crowns but you save the weight, and it's easy to convert back and forth.

Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 18:58 Quote
Some good advice here. You might consider taking it a step further.

Idea 1: Double-crown fork on a long-travel trail bike.

The Commencal Clash and YT Capra are good suggestions for burly bikes at a reasonable price. A double-crown fork will make the front end feel up to the job.

Idea 2: DH bike with a dropper post and all-mountain drivetrain.

There's no reason you can't ride a DH bike as a super burly trail bike. Just ensure it has a long enough reach and the seat-tube angle is steep enough for a proper climbing position with the seat up. If the ergonomics are good, the main thing holding it back is a couple pounds extra weight and 10% more squish, and I've never heard of an extra water bottle or a couple millimeters of pedal bob making the difference between being super fast and super slow! It won't be a World Cup XC racer, but I've done a couple trail rides on a DH bike and it wasn't so bad.

If you don't mind changing tires, a set of lighter tires for pedaling days will dramatically lower your rolling resistance and 2-ply DH tires will hold up to park use.

Posted: Sep 23, 2019 at 19:22 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Some good advice here. You might consider taking it a step further.

Idea 1: Double-crown fork on a long-travel trail bike.

The Commencal Clash and YT Capra are good suggestions for burly bikes at a reasonable price. A double-crown fork will make the front end feel up to the job.

Idea 2: DH bike with a dropper post and all-mountain drivetrain.

There's no reason you can't ride a DH bike as a super burly trail bike. Just ensure it has a long enough reach and the seat-tube angle is steep enough for a proper climbing position with the seat up. If the ergonomics are good, the main thing holding it back is a couple pounds extra weight and 10% more squish, and I've never heard of an extra water bottle or a couple millimeters of pedal bob making the difference between being super fast and super slow! It won't be a World Cup XC racer, but I've done a couple trail rides on a DH bike and it wasn't so bad.

If you don't mind changing tires, a set of lighter tires for pedaling days will dramatically lower your rolling resistance and 2-ply DH tires will hold up to park use.

Actually I have to agree with you on Idea 2.

I am only ride a DH bike. I need to go overseas to get proper DH trails (races). So whenever I am riding local trails I just ride my DH bike as well. I do not have a dropper post on my DH bike, but a QR seat clamp. My DH bike came with a 1x10 setup as standard. But the cassette was 11-25t. I changed my cassette to 11-34t. This makes it a bit easier to climb.
Don't expect to out-climb those enduro bikes or trails bikes with good riders on them. It will still takes more effort to climb because of the geometry of the bike and the weight. I consider this better workout!

Because I do ride only DH bike, and also use it for normal trails. My legs are powerful. I can climb pretty good. I very often out-climb riders here that riding nice trail/enduro bikes. I once ridden my friend's enduro bike. I was flying on that bike.
Outrunning everyone. Because my legs are build up to handle much more weight during climbing because of my DH bike.

If you don't mind to struggle the first few months and build up lots of power in your legs. You can just do it all on a DH bike. But it will be a struggle in the beginning. Hike a bike is also part of it. Haha

Posted: Sep 27, 2019 at 1:41 Quote
YT Capra, dual crown fork, done. The only drawback to an enduro bike is the seat tube length on the super steeps. I have both a capra and a Tues and this is a very easy answer for me.

Posted: Sep 27, 2019 at 2:29 Quote
Gallogar wrote:
Hi. I have an enduro bike. Cube fritzz 2017. It has 180mm of travel. I ride a lot of parks and sometimes enduro trails. In park i feel like my bike cant handle it. I ride pretty hard and i fell like my bike would fall apart. I was thinking of buying a downhill bike and i know i cant ride trails with it. I cant decide which bike should i get? I dont have money for two bikes.
Easy answer - you will not ride enduro trails (if there is no shuttle somehow up there) on DH bike because you will not be able to pedal it up. DH bike is meant to be ridden just down, up maybe just some short section i.e. in bike park from lift to start of line Big Grin
I suggest you buy separate DH bike for park, if you ride hard even more. Look maybe for some good preserved used ones to ease on budget.

If you change enduro for DH bike, then you will ride only where shuttle service is. If thats acceptable, only you know Big Grin

Posted: Sep 30, 2019 at 14:07 Quote
Enduro all the way.

Downhill bikes should really be renamed downhill race bikes. And what you want for downhill race isn't what you want for recreational park riding, in the same way you probably don't want a super stiff xc race bike with thin seat and slammed stem for your regular trail riding.

Look into Pole bikes. They are tanks, and are long and slack like DH bikes, while being great climbers as well due to the long front center.

Posted: Oct 1, 2019 at 12:57 Quote
it depends if you have to climb far get an endro but is you walk or get shutled or go to downhill parks get dh bike

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