Bike setup?

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Posted: Nov 14, 2019 at 6:51 Quote
So. I’m in Southern California where it’s dry and loose af, Since being here I feel like I have to constantly pay close mind to my front wheel washing out. I’m more along the lines of an experienced rider but far from “pro”. I’ve lowered my stem one spacer and I’m not sure if it helped. I was wandering if a longer stem may help the issue. Granted I know that’ll affect roll over and oh shit moments in a bad way. But I feel I’m strong enough to compensate. What makes me nervous is washing out in the corners constantly.

Posted: Nov 14, 2019 at 7:26 Quote
CamPow wrote:
So. I’m in Southern California where it’s dry and loose af, Since being here I feel like I have to constantly pay close mind to my front wheel washing out. I’m more along the lines of an experienced rider but far from “pro”. I’ve lowered my stem one spacer and I’m not sure if it helped. I was wandering if a longer stem may help the issue. Granted I know that’ll affect roll over and oh shit moments in a bad way. But I feel I’m strong enough to compensate. What makes me nervous is washing out in the corners constantly.

I also think its how you shift/place your weight, tires, air pressure, etc that you should test out.

Posted: Nov 14, 2019 at 21:34 Quote
CamPow wrote:
So. I’m in Southern California where it’s dry and loose af, Since being here I feel like I have to constantly pay close mind to my front wheel washing out. I’m more along the lines of an experienced rider but far from “pro”. I’ve lowered my stem one spacer and I’m not sure if it helped. I was wandering if a longer stem may help the issue. Granted I know that’ll affect roll over and oh shit moments in a bad way. But I feel I’m strong enough to compensate. What makes me nervous is washing out in the corners constantly.
Do you have an accurate tire pressure gage? you can use it to fine tune your pressure, and it can make a huge difference to how you and your bike feel. https://www.amazon.ca/Accu-Gage-PSI-Dial-Tire-Gauge/dp/B00070KA5I/ref=asc_df_B00070KA5I/?tag=googleshopc0c-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=292963924051&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5031626301342280823&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9001557&hvtargid=pla-437366653835&psc=1
Here is an accurate gage that goes to 60, and costs 12 dollars Canadian. Just remember that gages are more accurate in the middle of the range, so for this one 20-40 psi. you can get a 30 psi model as well, with .5 psi increments.

Posted: Nov 15, 2019 at 4:06 Quote
My first modern bike was like this, wanted to push every corner, never felt planted in the front, very loose feeling, 2017 5010 in XL. my next bike instantly railed the same trails. It was a 2018 Tallboy. There was something in the geometry that affected my placement on the bike. The TB had more BB drop, a longer wheelbase, and was a 29r. I am not sure what the offset on the 5010 fork was, but that may have played a role as well. I figured the 5010 was just big for me and made it hard to get my weight far enough forward coupled with the diff in geo. I now ride a Hightower LT in large and have no issues with handling, which I thought may be an issue again with such a slack HA. With the 5010, I always felt on top of the bike, which affected how I felt trying to make it turn. Just food for thought, hoping some of this may give you some things to consider.

Posted: Nov 15, 2019 at 20:30 Quote
What year/model are you riding as this makes the biggest difference in the advice you get. If it is a fairly modern geometry, then a longer stem will potentially help you get your weight over the front wheel for more traction. Aside from Tire pressure, what tire are you running? If it is OEM, you might consider getting something grippier. Have you tried the maxgripp maxim tires up front? I wouldn't go much longer than a 50mm stem on most modern geo bikes

Posted: Nov 18, 2019 at 8:17 Quote
I’m on a 2016 Orbea Rallon. Spank spike bars and stem. I have a nice pump so my tire pressures are good. Running Maxxis DHF in the front. When I can afford a new bike I’ll definitely get less offset on the fork I feel my bike is in the experimental era with fork offsets and HT angles. It’s amazing on the steep rough chundery stuff but lacks too much confidence in the corners. I may try my stock setup again because I have definitely become a harder charger since switching to the Spank stuff, and maybe it’s just not a good setup for my model bike in these conditions. But before that I’ll probly lower the stem one more spacer just to see if it helps. Much appreciated fellas. All a person can do is experiment with setups I guess. Especially when coming from the east coast with 95% of the time it’s the opposite conditions. Haha

Posted: Nov 18, 2019 at 12:19 Quote
CamPow wrote:
I’m on a 2016 Orbea Rallon. Spank spike bars and stem. I have a nice pump so my tire pressures are good. Running Maxxis DHF in the front. When I can afford a new bike I’ll definitely get less offset on the fork I feel my bike is in the experimental era with fork offsets and HT angles. It’s amazing on the steep rough chundery stuff but lacks too much confidence in the corners. I may try my stock setup again because I have definitely become a harder charger since switching to the Spank stuff, and maybe it’s just not a good setup for my model bike in these conditions. But before that I’ll probly lower the stem one more spacer just to see if it helps. Much appreciated fellas. All a person can do is experiment with setups I guess. Especially when coming from the east coast with 95% of the time it’s the opposite conditions. Haha

"I have a nice pump so my tire pressures are good." A nice pump in no way guarantees that the gauge is anywhere near correct to the right pressure. If you're setting up your pressures based on that gauge vs. what feels right and then marking where that is on the gauge... that could be your problem right there. Source: the exact same thing happened to me when I first got back into riding a few years ago.

Bought a nice floor pump and used it to set my pressures. Kept washing my front tire especially in dryer looser conditions. In my efforts to sort myself out, bought a good digital tire pressure gauge... and realized during it's first use that the gauge on my "nice" pump was 10psi off !!!!

It sounds stupid and I feel stupid for trusting that gauge vs trail feel or anything else, but I was just getting back into riding and had never used a tubeless set-up before. Anyway, set my pressures properly and my issues literally disappeared overnight.

Then I started bringing that gauge with me and experimented with various pressures on various terrain, dry and wet and found the pressures that worked best for me, my bike, my terrain and my riding style.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 19:53 Quote
I’ve been using this pump for about a year now. So I’m sure I know it’s good. I started my front tire pressure at 18 pounds because of this issue. But I ride wayyy too aggressively for that low of pressure, so I’ve worked my way up to between 24-26 depending where I ride. I weigh roughly 160 and set my pressures so I’m not rolling the bead and pinging my rims off everything. Trust me when I say my pressures are fine. I thinks it’s partially cockpit but mostly body position I need to fix.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 20:01 Quote
CamPow wrote:
I’ve been using this pump for about a year now. So I’m sure I know it’s good. I started my front tire pressure at 18 pounds because of this issue. But I ride wayyy too aggressively for that low of pressure, so I’ve worked my way up to between 24-26 depending where I ride. I weigh roughly 160 and set my pressures so I’m not rolling the bead and pinging my rims off everything. Trust me when I say my pressures are fine. I thinks it’s partially cockpit but mostly body position I need to fix.

I do trust you, but I also have to say that 24-26 psi in a front tire would feel like kack to me and I'm 60lbs heavier than you (220lbs). It might be worthwhile trying something with a stiffer sidewall or something like cushcore? If you are riding that aggressively, cushcore may be the best move.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 21:51 Quote
Try rolling your bars forward a little more, or drop another spacer. Might not help, but it's free. Worth a shot. Couldn't hurt to talk to a trusted local shop to see if they'd recommend a different tire for the sandier conditions in Cali. Dhf is my go to but I don't ride in Cali.

How tall are you, what reach you running? Just curious.

When was the last time the fork had a lowers service?

Posted: Nov 20, 2019 at 2:57 Quote
CamPow wrote:
I’ve been using this pump for about a year now. So I’m sure I know it’s good. I started my front tire pressure at 18 pounds because of this issue. But I ride wayyy too aggressively for that low of pressure, so I’ve worked my way up to between 24-26 depending where I ride. I weigh roughly 160 and set my pressures so I’m not rolling the bead and pinging my rims off everything. Trust me when I say my pressures are fine. I thinks it’s partially cockpit but mostly body position I need to fix.

I think the stem movement might be a tangent of an approach.

Depending on your fork, try softening up the low speed compression so the fork will plant itself more into the turns. You can also try slowing down the rebound. I would only perform one of these adjustments at a time on a single commonly used turn. You do not want to go the other direction and find yourself getting too sucked into the turn or bottoming out the fork on normal terrain.

cheers

Posted: Nov 20, 2019 at 15:38 Quote
I was dealing with this issue as well on a Large HD4. I'm 6'1" so am a little cramped on the large HD4. I was running a 60mm stem to compensate for the short reach and felt like I never had enough room in the front center of the bike to comfortably pedal out of the saddle (either too much weight over the front, or rear), and corner with confidence.

I swapped to an XL front triangle with a 50mm stem and it substantially improved my cornering confidence. It gave me room inside the front triangle to move before putting to much weight on/over the front wheel resulting in me knifing it in corners constantly.

Not a cheap solution, but this is what I ended up doing to mitigate my issue which sounds very similar to yours.

Posted: Nov 20, 2019 at 18:30 Quote
I ride in socal, DHF is pretty much the goto tire here. When you corner do you lean your bike over more than your body?

I know that in the winters here I tend to get used to the hero dirt and lean into the corners more with the bike. Once the trails dry up I get a lesson with a huge spill due to front wheel washout, which makes me change my cornering style to leaning the bike, but having a more upright body position.

Another thing, when you corner do you have any tendency to lean back? Maybe you aren’t weighting the front letting the front push out?

Posted: Nov 20, 2019 at 21:53 Quote
Wishiwasbiking wrote:
I know that in the winters here I tend to get used to the hero dirt and lean into the corners more with the bike. Once the trails dry up I get a lesson with a huge spill due to front wheel washout, which makes me change my cornering style to leaning the bike, but having a more upright body position.


I should also mention I ride in Southern CA too, and experience the exact same cornering phenomenon. Trust the bike in the winter and can get away with weighting the front more. Then winter dries up and back to typical conditions and I will have one or two "tuck the front" style crashes before I recalibrate again. I'm hoping the XL frame mitigates some of my over-weighting the front issues. So far so good.

Posted: Nov 23, 2019 at 11:25 Quote
wrote:
wrote:
I should also mention I ride in Southern CA too, and experience the exact same cornering phenomenon. Trust the bike in the winter and can get away with weighting the front more. Then winter dries up and back to typical conditions and I will have one or two "tuck the front" style crashes before I recalibrate again. I'm hoping the XL frame mitigates some of my over-weighting the front issues. So far so good.

Yea I believe Its just a trial an error thing I'm still not used to, soon im going to be replacing my tires. Gonna try the 120 tpi assegai up front and a WTB Judge in the rear.

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