Maxxis Tire Choice for My Trails?

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Maxxis Tire Choice for My Trails?
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Posted: Jan 4, 2020 at 16:49 Quote
I ride a 27.5 Stumpjumper FSR and am due for new tires. I currently run the specialized Butcher/Purgatory combo in 2.3" grid casing. My wheels are 27.5 aluminum Roval w/ 29mm inner width.

I live in Northeast MA (Gloucester) and mostly ride trails near where I live. This is slow to medium pace singletrack that is HIGHLY technical with roots and rocks everywhere. In spring and fall, these trails get wet and slippery roots, etc. I also get up to NH and VT to ride occasionally, where I get in some faster trails and fast burms, etc.

I was thinking of either going with new Specialized tires identical to what I already have, or trying something new -- Maxxis. I am considering going w/ Maxxis DHR II 2.3 rear and either the same up front, or DHF 2.3 front. Perhaps also a 2.5 tire in front.

What are your recommendations?

Posted: Jan 4, 2020 at 20:07 Quote
Here is a review on another to consider for NE...

https://youtu.be/xKRydIEG-rI

Posted: Jan 5, 2020 at 0:02 Quote
There are loads of great tires out there!

First, I do recommend you try something wider. Rolling resistance can actually be lower, traction is higher, and the ride is much smoother.

Unfortunately, I don't quite love Specialized tires, as the GRID casings aren't tough enough and the BLD DMND are a bit heavier than I like. If you haven't damaged your current casings, then Specialized has a solid product line.

Maxxis and Schwalbe are market leaders for good reason. You probably won't find anyone who doesn't like the top-end products from either company.

As undescended suggested, Vittoria has come out with some fantastic tires. I'm especially fond of the Martello, providing it's mounted on a rim that's not too wide (yours are fine).

IRC is back in the game with the excellent Tanken and Kenda has risen from the dead with the new Hellkat and Nevegal2, which are among my current favourites.

WTB's tread patterns have been excellent, but let down by sub-par casings and compounds. Thankfully, they've changed to a new supplier and the problems seem to be resolved. Models with the new "TriTec" compound are solid.

Bontrager tires rarely get the credit they deserve. Solid products, especially the SE5 for the front and SE4 for the rear.

Continental has fantastic rubber, but their casings haven't been up to par. I understand they've updated the casings; haven't tested them to confirm. Panaracer is also an unknown. They have a couple of new tread patterns that look good and their rubber has generally been good, so they could have potential.

Posted: Jan 5, 2020 at 20:26 Quote
We have similar riding conditions in the UK (especially the wet roots!) and I really like the DHF 2.5” and DHR 2.3” combo. Sometimes swapping to a high roller II out back during the summer.

I also tend to play with compound a bit. Going for the softer 3C compound upfront for grip and the harder compound at the back to reduce rolling resistance.

Posted: Jan 5, 2020 at 21:48 Quote
JamieKnight wrote:
[ ... ] harder compound at the back to reduce rolling resistance.

And durability. If you can find a Maxxpro 60 compound model, it makes an ideal rear tire.

Posted: Jan 6, 2020 at 5:56 Quote
If you don't encounter too much mud I would recommend a Maxxis Ardent on the rear. I ride in the Mid Atlantic and run a DHF up front and an Ardent on the rear on a SC Tallboy. The Ardent has been a great tire except for muddy climbs. It looks like it does come in a 27.5 X 2.4

https://www.maxxis.com/catalog/tire-294-140-ardent

Posted: Jan 19, 2020 at 20:08 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
JamieKnight wrote:
[ ... ] harder compound at the back to reduce rolling resistance.

And durability. If you can find a Maxxpro 60 compound model, it makes an ideal rear tire.

I like the idea of Maxxis DHR II 2.3 in rear and DHF 2.5 in front.

I am on the Maxxis website and there seems to be an infinite number of tire options with various coded acronyms distinguishing them from one another.

Can anyone share exact tire "part number" that would be best? I am thinking softer compound up front and "regular" compound in rear.

Posted: Jan 19, 2020 at 20:46 Quote
I don't see the Maxxpro 60 compound, which used to be the choice for a durable rear tire. Closest is probably the "Dual" compound (seventh column).

Some tips to decipher the chart:

Compound:
• 3C MaxxTerra: Three rubber types, not quite as soft as MaxxGrip, side lugs wear quickly.
• 3C MaxxGrip: Three rubber types, DH version.
• Dual: Two rubber types, more durable.

TPI: Theads per inch. Higher number is finer, more flexible, lighter, faster, and more expensive, compared to a lower TPI with equivalent construction. A 60 TPI single-ply is a lot more flexible, lighter, and faster than a 120 TPI 2-ply.

Casing:
• EXO: Lightest, least robust, fastest (all else being equal).
• EXO+: A little more durable than EXO.
• DD: DoubleDown, 120 TPI version of the DH casing, i.e. 2-ply, so it's essentially a full DH casing. Robust, but heavy and slow.
• DH: 60 TPI 2-ply downhill casing.

EXO & EXO+ are similar to each other. DD & DH are similar to each other. In terms of weight, rolling resistance, and toughness, there's a large gap between EXO / EXO+ and DD / DH.

Posted: Jan 20, 2020 at 20:07 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
I don't see the Maxxpro 60 compound, which used to be the choice for a durable rear tire. Closest is probably the "Dual" compound (seventh column).

Some tips to decipher the chart:

Compound:
• 3C MaxxTerra: Three rubber types, not quite as soft as MaxxGrip, side lugs wear quickly.
• 3C MaxxGrip: Three rubber types, DH version.
• Dual: Two rubber types, more durable.

TPI: Theads per inch. Higher number is finer, more flexible, lighter, faster, and more expensive, compared to a lower TPI with equivalent construction. A 60 TPI single-ply is a lot more flexible, lighter, and faster than a 120 TPI 2-ply.

Casing:
• EXO: Lightest, least robust, fastest (all else being equal).
• EXO+: A little more durable than EXO.
• DD: DoubleDown, 120 TPI version of the DH casing, i.e. 2-ply, so it's essentially a full DH casing. Robust, but heavy and slow.
• DH: 60 TPI 2-ply downhill casing.

EXO & EXO+ are similar to each other. DD & DH are similar to each other. In terms of weight, rolling resistance, and toughness, there's a large gap between EXO / EXO+ and DD / DH.

OMG.

Okay... Can anyone help me here? 2.5 DHF front and 2.3 DHR II rear. For riding northeast trails, which are often wet with rocks and roots everywhere. Rarely do I get up to NH and VT for fast riding. I am currently riding specialized Grid casings which have been fine.

Which compounds and all that for my 27.5 bike?

Posted: Jan 20, 2020 at 21:19 Quote
am-i-back wrote:
STOP TRYING TO TEACH ME THINGS AND JUST SPOONFEED ME

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 3:24 Quote
am-i-back wrote:
STOP TRYING TO TEACH ME THINGS AND JUST SPOONFEED ME

Martello/Agarro, no compound BS...Done

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 12:12 Quote
undescended wrote:
[ ... ] no compound BS

Choice is a good thing and I'm glad Maxxis gives us choices. They could have a more user-friendly website, though.

Haven't tried the Agarro, but the Martello certainly is a nice tire. Unfortunately, the 2.6" (can't comment on other sizes) works poorly on wide rims due to lack of tread wrap. Worked okay on 30 mm rims, but the tread is too centralized / "square" on 36 mm rims. Almost the entire tread contacts flat ground when the bike is upright and it's possible to lean beyond the tread and onto the sidewall.

It would be interesting to try the Martello 2.8" tread on the 2.6" casing.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 18:46 Quote
am-i-back wrote:
OMG.

Okay... Can anyone help me here? 2.5 DHF front and 2.3 DHR II rear. For riding northeast trails, which are often wet with rocks and roots everywhere. Rarely do I get up to NH and VT for fast riding. I am currently riding specialized Grid casings which have been fine.

Which compounds and all that for my 27.5 bike?


Hey, I ride the same area. The dhf/dhr II combo works great on the granite around here and has been my go to for years. I have tried many other tires and always end up going back.
3c MaxxTerra compound is definitely the way to go. They will wear faster than the dual compound versions but the extra grip is worth it.

The exact tires I recommend are:
[F] Maxxis Minion Dhf 27.5x2.5wt
3c Maxxterra/Exo/Tr
https://www.jensonusa.com/Maxxis-Minion-DHF-Wide-Trail-275-Tire

[R] Maxxis Minion Dhr II 27.5x2.4wt
3c Maxxterra/Exo/Tr
https://www.jensonusa.com/Maxxis-Minion-DHR-II-275-Tire

Posted: Jan 26, 2020 at 14:36 Quote
zackm103 wrote:
am-i-back wrote:
OMG.

Okay... Can anyone help me here? 2.5 DHF front and 2.3 DHR II rear. For riding northeast trails, which are often wet with rocks and roots everywhere. Rarely do I get up to NH and VT for fast riding. I am currently riding specialized Grid casings which have been fine.

Which compounds and all that for my 27.5 bike?


Hey, I ride the same area. The dhf/dhr II combo works great on the granite around here and has been my go to for years. I have tried many other tires and always end up going back.
3c MaxxTerra compound is definitely the way to go. They will wear faster than the dual compound versions but the extra grip is worth it.

The exact tires I recommend are:
[F] Maxxis Minion Dhf 27.5x2.5wt
3c Maxxterra/Exo/Tr
https://www.jensonusa.com/Maxxis-Minion-DHF-Wide-Trail-275-Tire

[R] Maxxis Minion Dhr II 27.5x2.4wt
3c Maxxterra/Exo/Tr
https://www.jensonusa.com/Maxxis-Minion-DHR-II-275-Tire


THIS is what I was looking for. Thanks and see you on the trails!

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