General bike lifespan

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General bike lifespan
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Posted: Jan 26, 2020 at 23:20 Quote
mark-p wrote:
Absolutely, "the upgrade bug" is the main reason for replacing perfectly serviceable bikes.
Parts that do wear are easily swapped out but if one is hankering after the latest wheel size or geometry then complete bike it is.

There is no reason why a frame that is undamaged will not last for 10s or years (or more). I think it is unlikely that many of the modern alloy or composite frame will ever last as long as a good old bit of steel.

My feeling is the it is in the industries interests to feed this as standing still would ultimately cost them business. IN the early days of mountain biking there were real improvements but for a long time now the gains have become marginal. Unless you are riding in top level competitions I remain unconvinced that most people would honestly notice the difference. It is like musical instruments where the new (or mostly different) feels better.

Again both areas are beset with the diminishing returns where the more you pay, the lest real change or improvement there is. At the top level it is often personal choice rather than one being better than the other.

Indeed, its feelings people are buying, don't forget that - marketing 101 probably these days, all the long standing factors etc. is just for marketing that people feel better - in reality they change bikes way before bike is not good anymore. Just look at commuter bikes in cities, 20+ years old shitty bikes still going strong... Big Grin

Posted: Jan 27, 2020 at 3:50 Quote
onyxss wrote:
Indeed, its feelings people are buying, don't forget that - marketing 101 probably these days, all the long standing factors etc. is just for marketing that people feel better - in reality they change bikes way before bike is not good anymore. Just look at commuter bikes in cities, 20+ years old shitty bikes still going strong... Big Grin

Comparing commuters to MTBs makes no sense. My commuter is 12 years old and still going strong, while in the same time period, I'm on my fifth different FS frame.
Bike that is used to move from point A to point B will, ofcourse, last a very long time.
One that is being hucked of a cliff will not.

If you don't get bitten by upgrade bug, I think that 2-3 years if realistic time for a MTB to live. Assuming you get around 100 days a year of riding.

Posted: Jan 27, 2020 at 8:21 Quote
I totally get the upgrade bug. Even when looking at bikes for sale, its easy to get carried away with "well for only a few hundred bucks more I get better suspension, and a few hundred above that I get better drivetrain and brakes" and before you know it you're well over your original budget.

And I know its super relative. Like, 100 days at Whistler is different than 100 days on your local XC trails.

Posted: Jan 27, 2020 at 8:24 Quote
From the late 90s through 2013 I averaged a little over 2 years per frame before replacing. Only one was due to failure, and only one do to not liking it. Everything else was just my getting excited about something new (to me) and better.

That changed with my 2012 5-Spot. Between simply loving it and other competing financial factors, I've ended up keeping it for over 7 years, now. I do little things to it, like going 1x11 when the 2x9 drive-train was finally shot, and treating myself to a bling handlebar. Otherwise, I enjoy it just as much now as I did then.

I am sure I would find a 2020 bike better (heck, even a 2017), but after 15 years of getting something new every few years, I was starting to feel like the cat chasing the laser dot on the floor (at ~$2,500 per pounce). In this case I really am going to wait until it fails.... I thinkBig Grin

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