Lockout lever on a fox 40?

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Lockout lever on a fox 40?
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Posted: Jan 20, 2020 at 12:59 Quote
Hi everyone, I have a 2016 intense dh, with a fox 40. I can’t afford another bike, and want to convert my DH to be more trail rideable. I want to put a dropper post on it, as well as a lockout system for the fork.
I know this will be heavy, but that just means a better workout, where I can trail ride.
Does anyone have any advice, or even know if the FOX 40 is compatible with any lock device? Thanks

Posted: Jan 20, 2020 at 17:15 Quote
Nothing really exists just because downhill bikes are really only designed to, well, go downhill, so there is not really a huge market for something like that. Same is true with the rear suspension, having no lockout, as well as most DH bikes suspension platforms are optimized for giving as much traction and squish, while sacrificing pedaling efficiency.

I know you say it will be heavy and you don't mind, which is true, but the bike will also be incredibly slack, so tight corners will be quite tricky, as well as the gearing is pretty high so climbing will be a nightmare. In all honesty I would probably say to trade it for an enduro bike. They are just as capable as DH bikes on almost all trails, and you will be much happier pedaling it uphill for trail riding.

Just my 2 cents

Posted: Jan 20, 2020 at 18:39 Quote
matt-15 is right.

I doubt there is a lock-out system for your Fox40.
Everyone that rides a DH bike, don't care about the Fox40 to be able to get locked out or not.
The bike is meant to go Downhill.

I pedal and climb hills with my Scott Gambler which has a Fox40. I know it's a pain in the ass etc. But I always think like this: "It's a good workout as I have to work 4 times as hard as someone on a "normal" bike."

If you hate the climbing or pedaling on your DH bike, then get another bike or only ride bikeparks. Otherwise just suffer and deal with it Smile

Posted: Jan 20, 2020 at 22:52 Quote
Over the last few months I've been riding my DH bike on flatter trails and pedalling it up.

It's got a 34t front and 36t rear and stood up it gets up most things ok.

It's worked better than I thought, but I've only managed a couple of hours each time before I'm exhausted.

The issues are:
Lack of dropper
Slack seat angle
Soft suspension
Slow rolling grippy tyres

The slackness of head angle and weight isn't a major thing for me.

For climbing, you don't want a lock out on the fork imo, as that pushes you back towards the rear when climbing and puts you in an even worse position for pedalling. A low front end aids climbing, and a locked out 200mm fork is about as far away you can get from a low front end. Smile

Ideally you want a lockout for the shock. A few years ago didn't some WC experiment with a shock lockout?

As I free test I would consider sliding the seat all the way forward in the rails to simulate steepening the seat angle and then experiment with increasing spring rate and low speed compression to stabilise the bike from pedaling and pumping efforts. You'd probably want to use nearly all the LSC if the trails are really flat.

If that works then maybe try fitting some faster rolling trail tyres (even just borrowing some old worn ones from a friend? )

If you accept it's a compromise then I think a DH bike can work ok as a trail bike. If you really are using it a lot like that though I'd consider selling for an enduro.

Posted: Jan 24, 2020 at 2:15 Quote
kiksy wrote:
Over the last few months I've been riding my DH bike on flatter trails and pedalling it up.

It's got a 34t front and 36t rear and stood up it gets up most things ok.

It's worked better than I thought, but I've only managed a couple of hours each time before I'm exhausted.

The issues are:
Lack of dropper
Slack seat angle
Soft suspension
Slow rolling grippy tyres

The slackness of head angle and weight isn't a major thing for me.

For climbing, you don't want a lock out on the fork imo, as that pushes you back towards the rear when climbing and puts you in an even worse position for pedalling. A low front end aids climbing, and a locked out 200mm fork is about as far away you can get from a low front end. Smile

Ideally you want a lockout for the shock. A few years ago didn't some WC experiment with a shock lockout?

As I free test I would consider sliding the seat all the way forward in the rails to simulate steepening the seat angle and then experiment with increasing spring rate and low speed compression to stabilise the bike from pedaling and pumping efforts. You'd probably want to use nearly all the LSC if the trails are really flat.

If that works then maybe try fitting some faster rolling trail tyres (even just borrowing some old worn ones from a friend? )

If you accept it's a compromise then I think a DH bike can work ok as a trail bike. If you really are using it a lot like that though I'd consider selling for an enduro.

I agree with you on not locking out forks ever.

Chris porter of mojo - "sigh, why on earth anyone would ever want to lock out a fork is beyond me. What are you tring to hike the front end up while climbing? No thats not what we want at all"

On a trailbike i feel like locking the fork makes the whole bike pivot around the front axle and run deeper in the rear travel, making the bike feel bogged down. So you get a fork with compormised design from an all out performance stand point and a useless feature.
People you dont want this shit....

Posted: Feb 6, 2020 at 21:23 Quote
theshermanator wrote:
Hi everyone, I have a 2016 intense dh, with a fox 40. I can’t afford another bike, and want to convert my DH to be more trail rideable. I want to put a dropper post on it, as well as a lockout system for the fork.
I know this will be heavy, but that just means a better workout, where I can trail ride.
Does anyone have any advice, or even know if the FOX 40 is compatible with any lock device? Thanks

One way to get what you are looking for is to run a long travel single crown fork with a lockout on it. I also like a front lock out for climbing if I am out of the saddle which feels like I get more power to the pedals vs using some making the fork bob. Sitting down, I prefer an active fork.

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