Suspension Designs

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Suspension Designs
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Posted: Jan 24, 2020 at 6:52 Quote
Who makes the best design?

My bike is from 2009 - Devinci Wilson - the bike still rides good, and the suspension design is something similar to what they use nowadays.

So it had me thinking if from 2009 to 2020 they still use similar suspension design, That's not a whole lot of change in what companies are doing. I dont know enough of the technical details to know the difference between my 2009 to current design set ups, but it has me sifting through on line articles to figure it out.

The Trek Session, Rocky Mountain Maiden, Norco Aurum, Scott Gambler, list goes on and on, they like their shock vertical and a simple Horst link design. Very simple, very popular so it seems.

So with few variations, but lots of companies to choose from, not sure how to narrow down who's doing it the best, or if it just comes down to preference.

Any input here is cool fellas.

Posted: Jan 24, 2020 at 18:20 Quote
Cdykman101 wrote:
Who makes the best design?

My bike is from 2009 - Devinci Wilson - the bike still rides good, and the suspension design is something similar to what they use nowadays.

So it had me thinking if from 2009 to 2020 they still use similar suspension design, That's not a whole lot of change in what companies are doing. I dont know enough of the technical details to know the difference between my 2009 to current design set ups, but it has me sifting through on line articles to figure it out.

The Trek Session, Rocky Mountain Maiden, Norco Aurum, Scott Gambler, list goes on and on, they like their shock vertical and a simple Horst link design. Very simple, very popular so it seems.

So with few variations, but lots of companies to choose from, not sure how to narrow down who's doing it the best, or if it just comes down to preference.

Any input here is cool fellas.

Between 2009 and now, most of the suspension updates have been in high flow valves...which has made a big difference. The fundamentals of the suspension circuits is basically the same though...just with high flow ported valves being standard now (they used to be a custom mod you'd buy from Risse Racing or Avalanche).

Fox's most recent update was with their GRIP/GRIP 2 damper, which removed the bladder from the primary damper circuit to increase durability. They used to tout the bladder of FIT as the best as it wouldn't cavitate or suffer from agitation bubbles...which it does well, and why the downhillers still use it. But for the average rider an "open bath" style circuit is more durable and requires a lot less service over time which is why they came out with the GRIP/GRIP 2 damper. And to be honest, the GRIP/GRIP 2 dampers are amazing. Great change that they picked up from Marzocchi and improved on.

The other innovation that you'll see is being done by a company called DVO. DVO replaced the IFP found on the air spring with a bladder. This shares no relation to the damper bladder discussed above. That's on the damper side. The bladder on an air spring is said to be better because it has less stiction than an IFP and results in smoother motion during highly dynamic terrain. I've ridden it a DVO shock it does seem pretty damn buttery...but all of the winners of pro downhill have never ridden a DVO shock so that probably says something.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRkuyj_B3Fk
https://dvosuspension.com/shocks/topaz-t3air/

Probably more info than you needed...but I'm a suspension nerd so yeah.

Posted: Jan 26, 2020 at 12:56 Quote
Are you thinking shocks or frame designs?

Both have come a long way, but IMO frame design is more important and effective. My Canfield Balance wide open pedals as well as a Trek Slash fully locked, with no sacrifice in performance and small bump compliance. Just an example.

Rocky Mountain suspension is tuned similarly — they pedal extremely well for how aggressive they can get. Very lively feeling, regardless of shock.

Pivot and Turner use a parallel link design similar to Canfield and Revel that also perform very well in all sorts of situations—playful and efficient, yet forgiving and confident.

In my personal experience, Canfield, Revel, Rocky Mountain and Pivot are all makers that have managed to bring the drawbacks of very capable suspension to an absolute minimum. I’ve owned Treks and Cannondales which are all basically glorified single pivots that rely on tricky dampers to stay efficient. It was hard to enjoy light duty casual rides on those because they just felt soggy when pedaling. Big hit performance was excellent, but casual single track was just a drag.

Not so on Rocky Mountain and Canfield, which I have the most time on lately. Even leaving the shocks unlocked I could still have an enjoyable time on casual rides. The drawbacks of huge suspension are just so minimal, the increased weight of the aggressive bike becomes the only “issue.”

Posted: Jan 27, 2020 at 5:58 Quote
Remonster wrote:
Cdykman101 wrote:
Who makes the best design?

My bike is from 2009 - Devinci Wilson - the bike still rides good, and the suspension design is something similar to what they use nowadays.

So it had me thinking if from 2009 to 2020 they still use similar suspension design, That's not a whole lot of change in what companies are doing. I dont know enough of the technical details to know the difference between my 2009 to current design set ups, but it has me sifting through on line articles to figure it out.

The Trek Session, Rocky Mountain Maiden, Norco Aurum, Scott Gambler, list goes on and on, they like their shock vertical and a simple Horst link design. Very simple, very popular so it seems.

So with few variations, but lots of companies to choose from, not sure how to narrow down who's doing it the best, or if it just comes down to preference.

Any input here is cool fellas.

Between 2009 and now, most of the suspension updates have been in high flow valves...which has made a big difference. The fundamentals of the suspension circuits is basically the same though...just with high flow ported valves being standard now (they used to be a custom mod you'd buy from Risse Racing or Avalanche).

Fox's most recent update was with their GRIP/GRIP 2 damper, which removed the bladder from the primary damper circuit to increase durability. They used to tout the bladder of FIT as the best as it wouldn't cavitate or suffer from agitation bubbles...which it does well, and why the downhillers still use it. But for the average rider an "open bath" style circuit is more durable and requires a lot less service over time which is why they came out with the GRIP/GRIP 2 damper. And to be honest, the GRIP/GRIP 2 dampers are amazing. Great change that they picked up from Marzocchi and improved on.

The other innovation that you'll see is being done by a company called DVO. DVO replaced the IFP found on the air spring with a bladder. This shares no relation to the damper bladder discussed above. That's on the damper side. The bladder on an air spring is said to be better because it has less stiction than an IFP and results in smoother motion during highly dynamic terrain. I've ridden it a DVO shock it does seem pretty damn buttery...but all of the winners of pro downhill have never ridden a DVO shock so that probably says something.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRkuyj_B3Fk
https://dvosuspension.com/shocks/topaz-t3air/

Probably more info than you needed...but I'm a suspension nerd so yeah.

It mostly says FOX/SRAM are willing to cut a bigger sponsorship check. Any of the top enduro/DH riders would run a RST fork if it paid better.

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