Has enduro become a bad word?

PB Forum :: All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country
Has enduro become a bad word?
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Message
Posted: Feb 24, 2020 at 0:27 Quote
There is a trend towards lower travel lighter all mountain or "trail" bikes in the Mountain biking world. The new darling seems to be 150 to 160mm max bikes that toy with slack and long geometry but remain poppy and playfull. Are people revolting against downhill bikes with droppers and dinner plate cassettes because trend or are we losing interest in battle axe 35lb bikes that climb like crap? 29 inch wheels with DD or cushcores on a budget are just gonna be heavy, carbon frame or not. If your budget is 10k you can have it all, so I wonder aloud how many 1 bike quiver types would go less travel and upright geometry just because they like the ride, or would you go big travel, long low and slack, beefcake tire/rims if your weight and cost was the same? Is this a reaction to cost or a serious interest in accepting a handicap to make it interesting like telemark skiing?

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 17:35 Quote
I think we are seeing enduro boom because 1) longer travel bikes are becoming easier to pedal, so why would you pay for 2 rigs, one for XC and one for dh when you can have one for both? And 2) at least for me, we’re not losing interest in full on downhill bikes, it’s just enduro is what we see more in the media because most mountain bikers don’t ride lifts nearly enough no make a 200mm travel bike worth the investment. If I could only ride park I would, but I can’t. And like I said before, here’s this bike that you can ride daily at the local trails, but also not break at the bike park. So for most of us that don’t live next to whistler, it just makes sense to bring our single crown bikes with us.

Posted: Feb 28, 2020 at 7:13 Quote
The vast majority of mountain biking is done riding up hills and then back down again. People like bikes that make the climb easier.

Posted: Feb 28, 2020 at 8:06 Quote
Marininmaine wrote:
I think we are seeing enduro boom because 1) longer travel bikes are becoming easier to pedal, so why would you pay for 2 rigs, one for XC and one for dh when you can have one for both? And 2) at least for me, we’re not losing interest in full on downhill bikes, it’s just enduro is what we see more in the media because most mountain bikers don’t ride lifts nearly enough no make a 200mm travel bike worth the investment. If I could only ride park I would, but I can’t. And like I said before, here’s this bike that you can ride daily at the local trails, but also not break at the bike park. So for most of us that don’t live next to whistler, it just makes sense to bring our single crown bikes with us.

I only have a full on dh rig because I got it for a spanking deal. But in general, I don’t like a “one bike does it all” nor do I like having 5 bikes. I think the happy number is right around 2-3 as it gives you more than enough space to have a variety. As of rn I have my 200mm rig and a 130/120mm trail bike (sized like a dj and used for street). It’s nice to have a small r
Variety, rather than having to use the same bike for everything, however, you don’t want to have so many you don’t use half of them

Regarding this thread, I don’t think that enduro has become a bad word. I just think it gets thrown around too often. A 5 inch travel bike isn’t an “enduro” everyone keeps forgetting the “all mountain” is still a class. An enduro bike is something that could be used at the EWS races. Longer travel 160+mm travel front and rear. And that’s not the only factor that classifies a bike as enduro. 90% of the bike being called an “enduro” are not even one.

Posted: Feb 29, 2020 at 21:51 Quote
Enduro has always meant going up and down for long periods of time. It has been around long before MTB's! Its not a type of bike!

Posted: Feb 29, 2020 at 22:03 Quote
yes, but an "enduro bike" is a type of bike, just like cross country is a type of bike, and that means something, like running or something. it just makes it easier than saying "a trail bike with more travel, but not as much travel as a downhill bike, used for going up and down, but is better at down than up."

Posted: Mar 1, 2020 at 10:12 Quote
MTBrandonLee wrote:
Marininmaine wrote:
I think we are seeing enduro boom because 1) longer travel bikes are becoming easier to pedal, so why would you pay for 2 rigs, one for XC and one for dh when you can have one for both? And 2) at least for me, we’re not losing interest in full on downhill bikes, it’s just enduro is what we see more in the media because most mountain bikers don’t ride lifts nearly enough no make a 200mm travel bike worth the investment. If I could only ride park I would, but I can’t. And like I said before, here’s this bike that you can ride daily at the local trails, but also not break at the bike park. So for most of us that don’t live next to whistler, it just makes sense to bring our single crown bikes with us.

I only have a full on dh rig because I got it for a spanking deal. But in general, I don’t like a “one bike does it all” nor do I like having 5 bikes. I think the happy number is right around 2-3 as it gives you more than enough space to have a variety. As of rn I have my 200mm rig and a 130/120mm trail bike (sized like a dj and used for street). It’s nice to have a small r
Variety, rather than having to use the same bike for everything, however, you don’t want to have so many you don’t use half of them

Regarding this thread, I don’t think that enduro has become a bad word. I just think it gets thrown around too often. A 5 inch travel bike isn’t an “enduro” everyone keeps forgetting the “all mountain” is still a class. An enduro bike is something that could be used at the EWS races. Longer travel 160+mm travel front and rear. And that’s not the only factor that classifies a bike as enduro. 90% of the bike being called an “enduro” are not even one.

I agree on that happy medium of bikes. But do you see how if someone who owned say, a xc hardtail, and wanted to start riding park, and couldn't find a spankin deal on a dh bike would want to go for something that could climb too so they could ride non lift access rowdier stuff on a still long(er) travel bike as well?

Posted: Mar 1, 2020 at 17:29 Quote
Some of us own a dh and a enduro bike! Over biked for my local stuff aside from the old school freeride hits and a dedicated bike for the high speeds at the bike parks. Of course when a 200 pound guy rides a 100+ days a year, you gotta spread the abuse around!

Previous Page | Next Page

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.004753
Mobile Version of Website