Is it time to ditch my trusty 2008 Trek Fuel?

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Is it time to ditch my trusty 2008 Trek Fuel?
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Posted: Mar 30, 2020 at 8:31 Quote
Hey everyone!

I am originally from Illinois so I have only been into mountain biking for a few years or so now, so I still always feel lost when its time to make changes or modify my bikes (still self teaching and learning the hard way lol). So do not roast me too hard!

I do about 60% downhill (I have a 18' Scott gambler for this) and around 40% climbing/all mountain style riding.

With that being said I think it may be time to upgrade my bike. It is a 2008 Trek Fuel. I have been hesitant as I have been slowly adding into the bike and as well all know its the components that start to get pricey. Plus it has been my learning bike for maintenance and general modifications.

Modifications I have as of now:
SRAM Eagle Technology 1x12 group set
PNW Components dropper post
Shimano Deore brake system
New front and rear disc breaks
New break lines
1.5 yr old new front Rock Shox front suspension
Then all the generic small modifcations such as new pedals, basic upgrades from stock wheel/tires (brand new), etc.

I am unsure if I should just sell all the components and get a new bike entirely or if I should look into building something custom and just adding on the extra components. Any advice on this topic would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you!!


Posted: Mar 30, 2020 at 10:14 Quote
Have you confirmed that all components would be compatible in a frame swap? If so, depending on the budget, the 2020 Fuel EX frame is incredible both up and down hill. I built up a 2020 EX-C and couldn't be happier.

Posted: Mar 30, 2020 at 14:01 Quote
I spent a summer on one of those. Frame designs have definitely come a long way by orders of magnitude. Bikes like the Rocky Mountain Instinct or Thunderbolt or the Revel Rail and Rascal are so efficient you don’t really need a climb switch, and they absolutely slay descents.

My uncle upgraded from his 08 Fuel to a Cannondale Scalpel and he can’t believe how much of a difference there is. And the Scalpel has less travel!

If you’re happy with it, keep it, but avoid riding something new at all costs because it will ruin you. I speak from experience.

Posted: Mar 31, 2020 at 4:19 Quote
I also fled Illinois (as most folks who work in healthcare do). That said, in IL there never was a reason to own a MTN bike....at all. What an entirely new world of MTN. More options than even road (tri/TT/Crit) bikes...as I am sure you know and has been said, make up your mind on spec's and dollars and get a bike. Then test ride it. I know so many folks who test ride the year away and never really do get a real test from an LBS.

Posted: Mar 31, 2020 at 10:11 Quote
mickeyrat wrote:
Have you confirmed that all components would be compatible in a frame swap? If so, depending on the budget, the 2020 Fuel EX frame is incredible both up and down hill. I built up a 2020 EX-C and couldn't be happier.

The only downside is that it has the 26" size tires so I would have to stick to a frame of that nature. I think its just time to upgrade the bike and sell as is and just take a hit on all the installed components.

I did demo some new XC bikes and ive had the itch to get a newer one ever since lol.

Posted: Mar 31, 2020 at 10:14 Quote
eicca wrote:
I spent a summer on one of those. Frame designs have definitely come a long way by orders of magnitude. Bikes like the Rocky Mountain Instinct or Thunderbolt or the Revel Rail and Rascal are so efficient you don’t really need a climb switch, and they absolutely slay descents.

My uncle upgraded from his 08 Fuel to a Cannondale Scalpel and he can’t believe how much of a difference there is. And the Scalpel has less travel!

If you’re happy with it, keep it, but avoid riding something new at all costs because it will ruin you. I speak from experience.

Yeah I think I kept adding components which helped a lot but after riding some of my friends XC bikes like you talked about all I can think about now is upgrading lol. There are so many nice bikes out there im starting to think that I may have to say goodbye to my Trek.

Posted: Mar 31, 2020 at 10:17 Quote
RoadStain wrote:
I also fled Illinois (as most folks who work in healthcare do). That said, in IL there never was a reason to own a MTN bike....at all. What an entirely new world of MTN. More options than even road (tri/TT/Crit) bikes...as I am sure you know and has been said, make up your mind on spec's and dollars and get a bike. Then test ride it. I know so many folks who test ride the year away and never really do get a real test from an LBS.

I think fleeing Illinois is always a solid life decision lol. I am also in healthcare at an outpatient clinic! What do you do in the healthcare field?

And it has been overwhelming for sure!! I have always owned gravel grinders but the past year I have really gotten into both XC and DH which has turned into my most favorite (and expensive) hobby lol.

Luckily my local bike shop guy is awesome about loaning bikes out to test out on the trails prior to purchasing.

Posted: Mar 31, 2020 at 10:51 Quote
It's time to part with the old bike. As others have said, geometry has changed so much that upgrading it is just throwing money at a lost cause.

My default recommendation for a high value, thoroughly modern bike is Marin's Rift Zone (aluminum) series. Modest travel, aggressive geometry, modern kinematics, and smart component choices. Geometry, not travel, is the new determinant of "capability" for a bike, but if you want a little more travel, Marin's Alpine Trail series are similarly great choices.

Posted: Mar 31, 2020 at 14:36 Quote
mickeyrat wrote:
Have you confirmed that all components would be compatible in a frame swap? If so, depending on the budget, the 2020 Fuel EX frame is incredible both up and down hill. I built up a 2020 EX-C and couldn't be happier.

Friend had to warranty a busted (again) fuel...few years old. Not a damn thing went onto the new 2020 bike (swingarm failures).

Posted: Mar 31, 2020 at 20:43 Quote
I kept my 1999 XC/Trail 3x9 26 and found a deal on a slightly used 2014 Enduro 27.5 set up exactly like I wanted several years ago. It is nice to have 2 bikes, and I still ride the old one regularly. If one is broken, ride the other. If a buddy visits without their bike, you can both ride your local trails (I always offer them the new bike)

My vote, buy a new (or slightly used) bike and keep the 2008 Trek.

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 0:56 Quote
Same here. I suggest just keep the 2008 Trek and get a new bike.

Your 2008 Trek is a 26", so your fork will not be compatible with the new 27.5 / 29" wheels.
Then most of the rest would be able to fit, likes brakes, levers, brakediscs, drivetrain, etc. Only you might need to buy new cables for them as the length is probably not correct, not sure what your dropper post radius is at your current bike, same with your headset etc.

So to avoid all the hassle, and maybe issues that might occur if you decided to swap and then find out later. Just get a new bike. Easiest.

Keep the 2008 Trek as a backup bike.

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 10:16 Quote
Tripmo wrote:
Same here. I suggest just keep the 2008 Trek and get a new bike.


Then most of the rest would be able to fit, likes brakes, levers, brakediscs, drivetrain, etc.


And, then there was "Boost".

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 18:56 Quote
RoadStain wrote:
Tripmo wrote:
Same here. I suggest just keep the 2008 Trek and get a new bike.


Then most of the rest would be able to fit, likes brakes, levers, brakediscs, drivetrain, etc.


And, then there was "Boost".

Ah yeah and now all bikes come with boost.

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