Getting wood for wooden features

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Getting wood for wooden features
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Posted: May 6, 2020 at 10:05 Quote
Where do you source your wood for wooden features? Are trail builders running to home depot and buying a bunch of 8' lumber to cut up to make features? If you are doing this, what species of lumber are you buying and what lengths?

Posted: May 10, 2020 at 15:13 Quote
For the wooden features I’ve built in the backyard I’ve primarily used treated lumber from the local lumber store. Only issue is treated lumber is slick and isn’t the best for surfaces that have contact with the tires where good grip is required. If possible, contact a local lumber mill to acquire rough cut lumber that will be grippier. Just make sure to pick a species that is rot resistant if you go with untreated wood. What is rot resistant may depend on where you live. The local lumber store that I use was able to connect me with a lumber mill that met my needs.

Posted: May 11, 2020 at 12:11 Quote
Sometimes i buy lumber but the only affordable lumber around here is pine and that wont last if its under treecover so i only use that out in the open where it drys fast.

For more durable structurs in the forrey i use mainly oak that i fell and mill myself, though thats alot of work.

another problem is the gear you will need for that. but if you considder milling your own lumber id tell you more about it.

Posted: Jan 14, 2021 at 8:29 Quote
One technique is to split logs into planks with an axe. This can be useful is you are working in the backcountry and don't have access to a chainsaw. Here is a wooden bridge I built using this technique:
new bridge I built

Posted: Jan 14, 2021 at 12:59 Quote
This came up recently if you can find the thread.

As mentioned, rough-cut lumber from a species that will not rot immediately is the best, and can be quite affordable. I use pressure-treated to contact the ground, and then rough-cut hemlock (or oak or locust when I can get it) for the planks that the bike tires roll on.

You can also get scrap for cheap from most lumber mills. Using oddball sizes and pieces with knots or raw edges actually looks pretty good on MTB features.

Posted: Jan 14, 2021 at 15:19 Quote
Joshgertlar wrote:
Where do you source your wood for wooden features? Are trail builders running to home depot and buying a bunch of 8' lumber to cut up to make features? If you are doing this, what species of lumber are you buying and what lengths?

If you live in the PNW cedar is generally the best wood, rot resistant, grippy when wet and if split correctly the surface flakes off and renews itself. the best technique to make planks is to hammer a line of wedges into a 2-3 foot round cut from near the base of the tree (not knots from branches).

a couple videos of the technique

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxCfU7L-2X0

https://nb-no.facebook.com/nsmba/videos/splitting-cedar/2277569225896494/

If you are on public land don't cut down any trees, cedars don't rot fast and and will still be in good enough condition to use once dead and on the ground.

Posted: Jan 14, 2021 at 16:07 Quote
Juniper also will work, it is essentially high desert cedar. We (three people) made a nice drop with two 4 by 4 posts, and a 20 foot cedar and some scrap pallet wood.

Posted: Oct 12, 2021 at 18:36 Quote
I have found using deck material is good for features I’ve been getting dock boards from the local boat marina

Posted: Oct 12, 2021 at 18:47 Quote
https://www.flickr.com/cameraroll/

Posted: Oct 17, 2021 at 7:27 Quote
I would think that the planks on pallets work well? You can get those cheap or free off the side of the road…

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