Someone please help me find back my FLOW

PB Forum :: All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country
Someone please help me find back my FLOW
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Message
Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 6:36 Quote
It's gone. Lost it. Doesn't come back.

Situation as following: living in a flattish area, home trails are pedally, flowy and mellow. Lots of short climbs and descents. My daily ride is a 29er 120 mm hardtail, perfect for my home trails. When I ride it, I'm a kung fu master of speed and style on a bike. At least, that's how it feels when I'm in the zone. BUT, it's all gone now.

It happened after a bike trip to the 'real' hills/mountains, where I used my 27,5" 150 mm trail bike with dropper and burly tires. After riding a lot of steep techy stuff over there, I just can't find the flow back on the hometrails with my hardtail. I keep struggling with washing out, using brakes way too often. And crashing. So frustrating. Been going on for several rides now.

What is it that's giving me so much trouble adapting back to my daily bike/terrain? Is it the use of the dropper post (don't use it on my home trails, not steep enough). Or is it the wheel size? The (lack) of rear suspension? The tires? The steepness of the terrain? Or is it just mental?

Anyone advice for finding back the flow? Or how to adapt quicker after changing between bikes?

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 10:37 Quote
I'd say its 90+% mental. Whenever I consciously think about braking or turning it usually ends up how you're describing it; awkward and less flowy. If you loosen up and maybe focus on the scenery or a song, anything but your movement on the bike, it might help you out.

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 11:17 Quote
It's definitely the wheel size. No one can. Ride fast on 27.5.

I jest. Sounds like body position issues. If the tires are washing out either your cornering technique is poor or your positioning is off.

Random question. How worn are the tires on your hardtail? I have a bad habit of going oh my used tires aren't that worn, only to eventually replace them and realize how bad they actually were

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 14:26 Quote
friendlyfoe wrote:
It's definitely the wheel size. No one can. Ride fast on 27.5.

I jest. Sounds like body position issues. If the tires are washing out either your cornering technique is poor or your positioning is off.

Random question. How worn are the tires on your hardtail? I have a bad habit of going oh my used tires aren't that worn, only to eventually replace them and realize how bad they actually were

The 29er should actually feel more natural for him; he's from the Netherlands where everyone is super tall, so he's probably around 200cm. 27.5 wheels feel like a kid's bike for taller riders

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 14:44 Quote
Too much squish will subconsciously push you to ride straight "through" obstacles. Path of least resistance. Just a guess but when your back on the hardtail try looking for that smooth line inbetween, around and creatively picking your way. Look for those little half buried rocks to pop off, stuff on your 150 travel you dont even feel. Go for that pop and floatfeeling and increase speed. If your conscious of small obstacles you can thread the needle and maybe that will put you in an attack position (more forward) in the turns. Weighting your front wheel and gaining front end traction. I go through this in reverse. When i switch from my hardtail to 170 squish, im still doing mental gymnastics to ride the smooth line, and really no reason not to just whole hawg blast through and the pop comes from much bigger "features." lay off rear brake, feel and feather the front till you hear and feel that tire about to give. it does more and gets you very conscious of front traction. No back end skidding BS. Worth a try i reckon (or wreckin)

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 15:08 Quote
David737 wrote:
friendlyfoe wrote:
It's definitely the wheel size. No one can. Ride fast on 27.5.

I jest. Sounds like body position issues. If the tires are washing out either your cornering technique is poor or your positioning is off.

Random question. How worn are the tires on your hardtail? I have a bad habit of going oh my used tires aren't that worn, only to eventually replace them and realize how bad they actually were

The 29er should actually feel more natural for him; he's from the Netherlands where everyone is super tall, so he's probably around 200cm. 27.5 wheels feel like a kid's bike for taller riders

Was totally joking. Hence the "I jest"

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 15:32 Quote
friendlyfoe wrote:
David737 wrote:
friendlyfoe wrote:
It's definitely the wheel size. No one can. Ride fast on 27.5.

I jest. Sounds like body position issues. If the tires are washing out either your cornering technique is poor or your positioning is off.

Random question. How worn are the tires on your hardtail? I have a bad habit of going oh my used tires aren't that worn, only to eventually replace them and realize how bad they actually were

The 29er should actually feel more natural for him; he's from the Netherlands where everyone is super tall, so he's probably around 200cm. 27.5 wheels feel like a kid's bike for taller riders

Was totally joking. Hence the "I jest"
Oh haha I totally missed that, I was on a call while reading and replying to your post lol.

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 22:55 Quote
Thanks guys, some good advice it seems! Going to try the line choice thing and weighting the front. Maybe I have been too static on the bike because my mind thinks there's nothing to it on the mellower trails.

@friendlyfoe can't be the tires, they are quite new.

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 22:58 Quote
Perhaps it's riding a more capable bike in faster steeper terrain has warped you perspective over how fast you can go on the hardtail? Plus riding steep stuff means you probs reprogrammed yourself to hang off the back.

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 at 23:09 Quote
Danzzz88 wrote:
Perhaps it's riding a more capable bike in faster steeper terrain has warped you perspective over how fast you can go on the hardtail? Plus riding steep stuff means you probs reprogrammed yourself to hang off the back.

I was actually thinking this too. Maybe being on the big bike actually made you faster and you are pushing your limits more now. Ive run into this myself frequently. I've been riding for 5 years now (am 33) and often find myself feeling like I'm not riding well, but if I think back to last year I'm on a different level.

I'd also suggest that getting more weight on the front isn't always the answer. I tried out an assegai 2.5 WT on the front this year running on a 25mm rim (coming from a dhf regular 2.5) and am not getting along with it. In flat corners the front wants to slide before the dissector on the back even budges and more weight on the front just makes it let go faster. To be fair I'm running it on a narrower rim than recommended, but tires, casing, and pressure have a huge impact on how the bike handles when leaned over.

As another aside I'm just setting a new bike up and handlebar height has made a huge difference. 1 spacer (all 5mm spacers) and the bike felt small and unbalanced. 2 spacers and I was riding the fastest I've ever ridden down one of my regular trails. 3 spacers and the bike was almost unrideable. Not to put too much stuff in your head, but if you found a position that was better on the big bike, it's possible the riding position on your hardtail just feels wrong now.

Posted: Jun 30, 2020 at 2:17 Quote
Reporting back from the topic starter: it's back, found my flow....

I think the main cause was that riding my big bike in steep terrain resulted in not enough weight on the front wheel when riding mellower terrain. Also trying to plough trough rougher sections like being on a big bike instead of good line choice on a hardtail is probably one of the culprits.

How I 'got over it':

- Spent some time on my cyclocross bike (good line choice on trails is a must with skinny tires and no suspension)
- Focus on dynamic riding position and line choice (also important when the trail isn't that demanding, especcially when cornering)
- Trying not think too much while riding...

Thanks for the advice guys!

Posted: Jun 30, 2020 at 10:10 Quote
marin0 wrote:
- Focus on dynamic riding position and line choice (also important when the trail isn't that demanding, especcially when cornering)
- Trying not think too much while riding...

Sometimes overthinking things a little is okay. That last article published interviewing Yoann Barelli had the question "what is the most common mistake you see riders making" and his answer was not hinging at the hips enough. Tried this on my next ride and was blown away by the difference it made. It feels super unnatural, kind of like I'm sticking my bum up in the air waiting for a surprise lol, but instantly I had more front end grip/control in corners and my legs weren't getting tired on descents. Completely changed my riding. I think it's the same with most 2 wheeled sports that what seems natural often isn't the best way to do it.

Previous Page | Next Page

 
Your subscriptions
no posts

Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.006102
Mobile Version of Website