Fox 36 Grip 2 - Service a new fork to remove excess grease?

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Fox 36 Grip 2 - Service a new fork to remove excess grease?
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Posted: Jun 21, 2020 at 13:45 Quote
I have a ~6 week old YT w/ a 150mm Fox 36, GRIP 2. I'm alternately very impressed by and also frustrated by this fork, but creeping slowly towards dialed.

It takes big hits from jumps and drops very well, and is pretty comfortable to pedal, however I've struggled a bit with how it feels on fast impacts/square edge hits and chattery sections when it can start to feel a bit harsh to me.

At this point I have the high speed compression fully fast (16 out), the low speed pretty fast, but a bit slower, and a moderate amount of rebound on each. I've settled on running a bit under the recommended pressure after playing around with lower/higher/at recommended - I'm 215, and I've currently got 82psi with one volume spacer in there, and it's definitely the best it has felt so far.

However, I've seen a few things mentioned about the amount of grease in the fork from the factory, and saw, for example, the Lost Co video on installing the GRIP 2 where there was just a TON of grease on the brand new fork he took apart. My assumption is that they do this thinking that a lot of their customers aren't going to take very good care of their fork, and it's better to overdo it so things don't wear out as fast when they aren't taken care of properly, and that people who service regularly will clean it up and put a more reasonable amount of grease on things...

Which leads me to - would it make sense to go through the trouble of pulling the essentially brand new (I guess I've got 370 miles and 43 hours on it) fork apart and cleaning it up and putting it back together? Have folks done this and seen improvements in the kind of stuff I'm referring to?

Thanks for any insight...

Posted: Jun 23, 2020 at 9:21 Quote
I would say its not worth it to pull apart until it needs to be serviced. If you are having trouble setting up the fork i would see if a bike shop near you rents a shock wiz

Posted: Jun 24, 2020 at 8:46 Quote
What is "a moderate amount of rebound?" Having a rebound that is set too slow is one of the main reasons a fork can feel harsh on chattery sections.

Posted: Jun 24, 2020 at 8:51 Quote
TwoWheelMike wrote:
What is "a moderate amount of rebound?" Having a rebound that is set too slow is one of the main reasons a fork can feel harsh on chattery sections.

HSR: 9 out from closed
LSR: 6 out from closed

Posted: Jun 24, 2020 at 8:56 Quote
Also the bike felt pretty damn good yesterday, so maybe I should shut up and ride. Smile

Posted: Jul 13, 2020 at 9:12 Quote
Take 20 mins and watch these two videos.

It sounds like you have fallen into a common trap of tuning for one bump instead of a section.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv3cgJIteQ8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-ydae6yOdA

Posted: Jul 13, 2020 at 14:40 Quote
Throckmorten wrote:
Take 20 mins and watch these two videos.

It sounds like you have fallen into a common trap of tuning for one bump instead of a section.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv3cgJIteQ8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-ydae6yOdA

So how do you reccomend setting up the suspension? With faster or slower rebound dampening?

Posted: Jul 13, 2020 at 16:26 Quote
Throckmorten wrote:
Take 20 mins and watch these two videos.

It sounds like you have fallen into a common trap of tuning for one bump instead of a section.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv3cgJIteQ8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-ydae6yOdA

Some good info there... though I'm not entirely sure what to do with the information yet other than maybe try slowing down my low speed rebound.

I did some bracketing over a section that had a lot of chop, but I'm good at second guessing myself.

Posted: Aug 7, 2020 at 19:01 Quote
I borrowed a Shockwiz and have been playing around with it the last week or so, with kind of mixed results.

I had the fork feeling really pretty damn good after a few rides with it - it had me remove a fairly substantial amount of air from what I had been running, and really did help me dial in the compression and rebound...

But it told me to add a volume spacer (I had removed one from the 2 that came installed originally, so I just had one), and then it had me install another... now it thinks I'm very dialed (92%, I think? It wants the high speed compression faster, and I can't go any faster) based onr what I asked for on the tune (Neutral - Poppy), but I think I much preferred it with the single volume spacer, so I'm going to go back to that and see what it tells me on compression/rebound (I think this will change once I've removed stuff again), and see where I land. Main difference was lower pressure, a bit slower rebound, a bit faster compression.

I ran it on my rear shock (DPX2) tonight, and where I had it to begin with was very close to where it is saying I'm dialed. Again, faster compression, slower rebound, and I think it does feel a bit better.

I'm a little worried I've got some rattle/clunk in the damper side of the fork, but it's more likely the OneUp EDC stem I installed w/ the non-starnut preload, even though it kind of feels like it's that side of the fork. I will likely go get a starnut put back in the steerer tomorrow and see if that clears that issue up, then possibly look at that preload kit again and seeing if I can sort out whatever is going on there.

Posted: Aug 21, 2020 at 1:50 Quote
Does your fork suck down if you let all the air out??? If it does pull the air spring out give it a good clean up (there will be a ton of grease in it) and reinstall it correctly.

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