Transition Spur

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Transition Spur
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Posted: Feb 21, 2021 at 7:44 Quote
Scottwhatever802 wrote:
I was waiting for an updated smuggler, then the spur came out instead. Overall the spur sounds a little lite duty. Why does the spur get such good pedal review and the smuggler doesn't? Other then weight and 20 mm fork difference then are vary similar.

weight and geo and just such a balanced bike

Posted: Feb 21, 2021 at 7:48 Quote
Scottwhatever802 wrote:
I was waiting for an updated smuggler, then the spur came out instead. Overall the spur sounds a little lite duty. Why does the spur get such good pedal review and the smuggler doesn't? Other then weight and 20 mm fork difference then are vary similar.

Spur suspension kinematics are different. Better support and progression in that suspension, paired with its lite weight make it very different than the Smuggler. I test rode a Smuggler and didn't think it was anything special. Spur is nothing short of special!

Posted: Feb 21, 2021 at 8:24 Quote
Spur is definitely lighter duty but with good brakes you can send it

Posted: Feb 21, 2021 at 9:34 Quote
newbermuda wrote:
Spur is definitely lighter duty but with good brakes you can send it

good point that , ive got xt 4 pot on mine and paired with dhf and dissector tyres it holds up to all but the roughest loose descents I ride , only really find its limits on super steep loose long descents ,when a bit more rear end suspension and weight helps with the traction needed , other than that would happily ride it anywhere

Posted: Feb 21, 2021 at 15:34 Quote
scblurlt wrote:
newbermuda wrote:
Spur is definitely lighter duty but with good brakes you can send it

good point that , ive got xt 4 pot on mine and paired with dhf and dissector tyres it holds up to all but the roughest loose descents I ride , only really find its limits on super steep loose long descents ,when a bit more rear end suspension and weight helps with the traction needed , other than that would happily ride it anywhere

im running the stock g2 RS and 180/160mm rotors, not so great on super steep loose descents but full sends only

Posted: Feb 22, 2021 at 6:16 Quote
Hey there, before I join the growing queue for a Spur I was hoping for some real-world feedack on sizing. I ask as an existing owner of a size L Vanquish which I have always felt to be a bit small (running a 70mm stem and a 410mm rigid seatpost barely meets the top/seat tube junction).

I'm approx 6ft/182cm tall with a 34in/87cm inside leg (scrawny build at 155lbs/70kg), from an XC background but with a definite bias towards downcountry!

I've read the online guidance but would appreciate some feedback, particularly from the leggy six footers.

Cheers

Posted: Feb 22, 2021 at 9:06 Quote
daiboy wrote:
Hey there, before I join the growing queue for a Spur I was hoping for some real-world feedack on sizing. I ask as an existing owner of a size L Vanquish which I have always felt to be a bit small (running a 70mm stem and a 410mm rigid seatpost barely meets the top/seat tube junction).

I'm approx 6ft/182cm tall with a 34in/87cm inside leg (scrawny build at 155lbs/70kg), from an XC background but with a definite bias towards downcountry!

I've read the online guidance but would appreciate some feedback, particularly from the leggy six footers.

Cheers

sorry as a 5'6" short legged hobbit cant help too much. apart from to say I ride a medium with 35 mm stem and seat forward , and. its a perfect fit , also loads of room for a long dropper post , can recommend one up to get most range you can

Posted: Feb 22, 2021 at 9:58 Quote
daiboy wrote:
Hey there, before I join the growing queue for a Spur I was hoping for some real-world feedack on sizing. I ask as an existing owner of a size L Vanquish which I have always felt to be a bit small (running a 70mm stem and a 410mm rigid seatpost barely meets the top/seat tube junction).

I'm approx 6ft/182cm tall with a 34in/87cm inside leg (scrawny build at 155lbs/70kg), from an XC background but with a definite bias towards downcountry!

I've read the online guidance but would appreciate some feedback, particularly from the leggy six footers.

Cheers

I'm 5'10 / 178cm and ride a Large with 35mm stem, is perfect but wouldn't want longer. So guessing a L with the stock 50mm stem would be good.

Posted: Feb 22, 2021 at 10:03 Quote
scblurlt wrote:
daiboy wrote:
Hey there, before I join the growing queue for a Spur I was hoping for some real-world feedack on sizing. I ask as an existing owner of a size L Vanquish which I have always felt to be a bit small (running a 70mm stem and a 410mm rigid seatpost barely meets the top/seat tube junction).

I'm approx 6ft/182cm tall with a 34in/87cm inside leg (scrawny build at 155lbs/70kg), from an XC background but with a definite bias towards downcountry!

I've read the online guidance but would appreciate some feedback, particularly from the leggy six footers.

Cheers

sorry as a 5'6" short legged hobbit cant help too much. apart from to say I ride a medium with 35 mm stem and seat forward , and. its a perfect fit , also loads of room for a long dropper post , can recommend one up to get most range you can

5'10" with a 31" inseam I ride a large with 40mm stem and run a OneUp 210mm dropper.

Posted: Feb 22, 2021 at 10:55 Quote
Nice one, cheers all

Posted: Feb 25, 2021 at 11:16 Quote
5'11.5" and I am riding/reviewing Large Spur. Great fit.

Posted: Feb 28, 2021 at 4:40 Quote
How are your Spurs fairing in the mud? The maint pivot and seat stay pivots catch the mud quite effectively. This might pose a problem in the long term, I think.
So far I put a strip of mastic tape over the gap between the swingarm and bb shell, so nothing gets lodged or eaten inside of there.
The seat stays might even be open, facing their pivots. So potentially mud could end up inside the stays. Did anybody take the rear end apart yet?

Posted: Mar 1, 2021 at 9:40 Quote
pyromaniac wrote:
How are your Spurs fairing in the mud? The maint pivot and seat stay pivots catch the mud quite effectively. This might pose a problem in the long term, I think.
So far I put a strip of mastic tape over the gap between the swingarm and bb shell, so nothing gets lodged or eaten inside of there.
The seat stays might even be open, facing their pivots. So potentially mud could end up inside the stays. Did anybody take the rear end apart yet?

If its super muddy i'll spray some water into the seat stay pivots to clean them out after each descent. But i definitely get worried about stuff getting crunched in there. Could maybe put some tape over it to keep the majority out.

Posted: Mar 1, 2021 at 10:10 Quote
pyromaniac wrote:
How are your Spurs fairing in the mud? ...
The seat stays might even be open, facing their pivots. So potentially mud could end up inside the stays. Did anybody take the rear end apart yet?

I haven't ridden mine in the mud very much, but lots of dust and sand in the Southwest US. I took the linkage apart chasing a creak yesterday, and I am a little underwhelmed by the design. The ends of the seatstays facing the rocker link are completely open. There was a ton of sand and grit rattling around inside the rear triangle, which must have gotten in through those openings. I shook it around to get as much of the grit out as possible, but there is still some in there. Additionally, installing the rocker link back into the seatstays was kind of a pain. There is a bearing shield on each side of each bearing, so four total at the seatstay/rocker interface, and they all need to stay in place together as the link slides between the seatstays. It is a pretty tight fit, so it is easy to knock a bearing shield off and have to start the process over, likely needing to clean the shield again after it fell on my dirty garage floor. A little grease helped keep the shields in place, but it is still pretty tricky to align correctly. Also, the shields are stepped with the stepped side facing the bearing, which doesn't end up fully shielding the bearing. There was a lot more grit on my bearings than I expected based on how many miles the bike has seen. I love the bike, but the design of the seatstay/rocker link interface is not ideal, especially compared to more refined designs like Santa Cruz.

Posted: Mar 1, 2021 at 10:24 Quote
crj5 wrote:
pyromaniac wrote:
How are your Spurs fairing in the mud? ...
The seat stays might even be open, facing their pivots. So potentially mud could end up inside the stays. Did anybody take the rear end apart yet?

I haven't ridden mine in the mud very much, but lots of dust and sand in the Southwest US. I took the linkage apart chasing a creak yesterday, and I am a little underwhelmed by the design. The ends of the seatstays facing the rocker link are completely open. There was a ton of sand and grit rattling around inside the rear triangle, which must have gotten in through those openings. I shook it around to get as much of the grit out as possible, but there is still some in there. Additionally, installing the rocker link back into the seatstays was kind of a pain. There is a bearing shield on each side of each bearing, so four total at the seatstay/rocker interface, and they all need to stay in place together as the link slides between the seatstays. It is a pretty tight fit, so it is easy to knock a bearing shield off and have to start the process over, likely needing to clean the shield again after it fell on my dirty garage floor. A little grease helped keep the shields in place, but it is still pretty tricky to align correctly. Also, the shields are stepped with the stepped side facing the bearing, which doesn't end up fully shielding the bearing. There was a lot more grit on my bearings than I expected based on how many miles the bike has seen. I love the bike, but the design of the seatstay/rocker link interface is not ideal, especially compared to more refined designs like Santa Cruz.

damn that sucks. Do you think taping the open ends of the seat stays would work?


 
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