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Intense primer 29 and sniper t vs: pivot, yeti, transition, giant, yt, fezzari, canyon... for MIDATLANTIC! No pedal destroyers!

PB Forum :: Intense
Intense primer 29 and sniper t vs: pivot, yeti, transition, giant, yt, fezzari, canyon... for MIDATLANTIC! No pedal destroyers!
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Posted: Oct 4, 2020 at 16:28 Quote
Any of you able to ride and compare the other 12x-14x travel, brands/bikes to INTENSE?
Looking for a great all around MIDATLANTIC, totally different environment of riding.

All the videos and reviews, and comparisons, are in the west and or at ski resorts. I live in the Northern Virginia area. I need a bike for the Tight single track and switch backs, along with the multiple types of terrain and soil we have in this region. I do not I do not Want a bike that is a pedal and Crank set destroyer!!!!
A bike that performs well at: sprints, Climbs, descents, flat areas, roots, ruts, really rocky, loose soil, loose on hard, mud, sand, loam...

Will the new Geometry of the LOW, long and slack, be harder on the knees since I assume the knee will be more in front of the pedal spindle vs traditional? Is the Intense geometry a little behind, in reality? Is this good or bad for a pedal everywhere bike? Not just descending!

I do not want to get beat up or jack hammered, but I don’t want a wet noodle.
I am 6 foot 1 inch tall and 165 pounds naked.

A bike and manufacture I can count on In the backcountry, and to have to have quality support post sale!!!
Thank you!

Posted: Jan 10, 2021 at 13:51 Quote
i have a SC 5010 as my primary bike and im 5’8”. i came off a 29r and i love that bike. i ride Md and PA trails alot where its ricky and do get alot of pedal strikes

i recently got a Primer 275. seemed like a bad ass bike but when i got it i decided to send it back and get the 29 version. figured there is no sense in having two 27.5. the primer 29 i feel will be almething i can take in the chunk and spend quite a few hrs on riding regardless of the terrain

Posted: Jan 11, 2021 at 17:56 Quote
Intense frames crack often. They can be slow processing warranty claims even before covid. I suggest that you spend your hard earned cash elsewhere.

Posted: Jan 11, 2021 at 21:18 Quote
Can you elaborate on that claim?

Not disagreeing, or trying to start anything.... just worried about my frame now.

Posted: Jan 16, 2021 at 9:19 Quote
I have been riding on intense frames for 6 years. In that time I had:
2014 Intense Carbine
4 delaminated g2 dropouts (axle hanger)
2016 Intense Tracer
3 catastrophic rear triangle lower mout fractures. The frame nearly split in half.
2018
3 delaminated lower front triangle pivot tubes.

For a total of 10 broken bikes. Not one has ever lasted 12 months. I am not racing, crashing, or intentionally braking frames. However, I demand alot from the bike. I am built like a running back at 6"-0" 210lbs.

The photo is 42 months of my 72 month history with intense

Posted: Jan 18, 2021 at 15:07 Quote
Well you have 20lbs on me at 6'2. I haven't had one of their carbon frames before getting a deal on a 18 carbine.

Maybe I should have put up for a Santacruz or a pivot

Posted: Jan 19, 2021 at 21:25 Quote
Hi bambaatacas, I'm also not disagreeing, or trying to start anything either. I'm just curious on why you choose to stick with the Intense cycles brand for 6 years after so many frame failures?

Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 0:03 Quote
mtnbikerva1,

Normally, I'm a strong advocate for long and slack geometry, but I agree your terrain isn't the best candidate for it. A typical bike will work nicely, just avoid the especially long, low, or slack outliers.

Regarding pedal strikes: An overlooked factor is low-speed compression damping. We rarely strike pedals at the sag point; it usually occurs when the bike wallows into a small compression. Increasing the low-speed compression damping really helps prevent this.

Most sagged BB heights will be ±5 mm from the average within a given category. The difference between BB heights at the bottom of a minor wallow will be several times this much on a bike with wide-open LSC vs. one with fairly firm LSC.

Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 11:23 Quote
rpb10276 wrote:
Hi bambaatacas, I'm also not disagreeing, or trying to start anything either. I'm just curious on why you choose to stick with the Intense cycles brand for 6 years after so many frame failures?

I stayed with intense because I didn't have the money to leave. I couldn't justify spending $4k-$5k on my "I want" when my wife and kids have needs.

Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 13:01 Quote
I totally understand. I'm asking because I currently ride a 2020 Primer 29er and I'm loving it. But at the same time, this whole carbon movement does make me worry. I've seen and heard about so many carbon trail/enduro bikes carbon frames breaking. And it's always in the back of my head when I'm riding my carbon Primer. And I've been thinking about upgrading to an Intense M29 from my next DH bike. But all these carbon failures make me worry. Starting to think I should look towards aluminum frames again. Thanks for sharing you story with us.

bambaatacas wrote:
rpb10276 wrote:
Hi bambaatacas, I'm also not disagreeing, or trying to start anything either. I'm just curious on why you choose to stick with the Intense cycles brand for 6 years after so many frame failures?

I stayed with intense because I didn't have the money to leave. I couldn't justify spending $4k-$5k on my "I want" when my wife and kids have needs.

Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 13:22 Quote
Aluminum frames also crack. I'm not convinced carbon frames fail more frequently, overall, but there have been some models - and entire companies - with unacceptably high failure rates.

A carbon frame may save 1 - 2 lb over aluminum and usually costs $1,000 - $2,000 extra, which typically comes to $1 - $3 for every gram saved. There are usually cheaper ways to save weight and always cheaper ways to improve performance.

To put the weight into perspective: for bambaatacas, who's 210 lb, a 30+ lb bike and nearly 10 lb of shoes, gear, clothing, water, etc., saving 2 lb reduces the system weight by 0.8%. On a half-hour climb, the upper limit of the time saved* is about 14 seconds. Factoring in all other sources of energy dissipation, it will be under 10 seconds.

Posted: Jul 28, 2021 at 13:14 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Aluminum frames also crack. I'm not convinced carbon frames fail more frequently, overall, but there have been some models - and entire companies - with unacceptably high failure rates.

A carbon frame may save 1 - 2 lb over aluminum and usually costs $1,000 - $2,000 extra, which typically comes to $1 - $3 for every gram saved. There are usually cheaper ways to save weight and always cheaper ways to improve performance.

To put the weight into perspective: for bambaatacas, who's 210 lb, a 30+ lb bike and nearly 10 lb of shoes, gear, clothing, water, etc., saving 2 lb reduces the system weight by 0.8%. On a half-hour climb, the upper limit of the time saved* is about 14 seconds. Factoring in all other sources of energy dissipation, it will be under 10 seconds.


Winning is winning. Big Grin

Posted: Aug 18, 2021 at 5:45 Quote
Have a primer 29 bandit and love it for NC and SC riding which is a lot like yours. It has never failed me yet for something that was the bikes fault. I had a yeti and loved it too. Also have ridden a 5010 and that’s awesome as the SC bikes are. If you’re wanting a solid frame warranty out of fear then other companies are good for that if it’s your primary concern. I haven’t done anything to mine yet but I am a conservative rider and I am 225 with gear

Posted: Nov 27, 2021 at 21:46 Quote
I’ve been on my 2020 Primer 29 Pro for 1.5 years and love it. I also was worried going carbon after 22 years of running aluminum. I’ve had aluminum frames fail. I also have an aluminum Intense from 2002 that is still going strong. I’m 6’ and 230lbs. If that tells you anything. I also ride pretty hard in Colorado rocky terrain. Hoping this carbon Primer lasts because it’s a sweet ride and I’m without complaint.

Posted: Nov 28, 2021 at 6:53 Quote
bambaatacas wrote:
I have been riding on intense frames for 6 years. In that time I had:
2014 Intense Carbine
4 delaminated g2 dropouts (axle hanger)
2016 Intense Tracer
3 catastrophic rear triangle lower mout fractures. The frame nearly split in half.
2018
3 delaminated lower front triangle pivot tubes.

For a total of 10 broken bikes. Not one has ever lasted 12 months. I am not racing, crashing, or intentionally braking frames. However, I demand alot from the bike. I am built like a running back at 6"-0" 210lbs.

The photo is 42 months of my 72 month history with intense

Perhaps time to try a different brand lol. Stop giving them your repeat business. I would have looked for something else after the second failure.

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