Ribble HT 725

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Ribble HT 725
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Posted: Oct 7, 2020 at 11:58 Quote
Recently cracked my second Whyte 905 frame in 2 years and that bike is now out of warranty so my next frame is out of my pocket. Looking to change to different brand and I am loving the look of the Ribble HT 725 frame's geometry as well as its looks.

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-ht-725-frameset/

I was just wondering about the strength of Reynolds 725 tubing as I am clearly very hard on my bikes. A lot of bikes seem to use 853 tubing or 4130 chromoly, so how does 725 compare in terms of strength?

Posted: Jan 5, 2021 at 8:24 Quote
LeithB wrote:
Recently cracked my second Whyte 905 frame in 2 years and that bike is now out of warranty so my next frame is out of my pocket. Looking to change to different brand and I am loving the look of the Ribble HT 725 frame's geometry as well as its looks.

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-ht-725-frameset/

I was just wondering about the strength of Reynolds 725 tubing as I am clearly very hard on my bikes. A lot of bikes seem to use 853 tubing or 4130 chromoly, so how does 725 compare in terms of strength?

Did you get one? I've just ordered Smile

Posted: Jan 5, 2021 at 13:08 Quote
Yeah I did get one.
It is as the website shows a stunning looking bike and it rides incredibly well. Very stable and confidence inspiring at high speed but easy to move around too, all the clichés.

However...

I did crack the frame on top of the down tube where it is welded to the headtube after 2 months of not particularly hard riding, no where near the shit I put my old Whyte through. In general I would say the welds are not the most beautiful things ever, some of them do get a bit globby. But on the bright side I can tell you that the Ribble customer service was perfectly good; no questions asked they just sent me out a new frame and I was back out on my bike in about 2 weeks.

Besides that, a few other down sides are, that the paint chips and scratches very easily. The internal routing for the dropper and rear derailleur is extremely difficult to route and on both my frames the cables have rattled quite badly but if you but a zip tie around the entry holes to keep the cable taught inside the frame the noise does stop.

Overall I am very happy with my bike though and as long as my new frame lasts more than 2 months I will be very satisfied.
Hope you enjoy your new bike.

Posted: Jan 8, 2021 at 5:52 Quote
Cheers mate my frame arrived yesterday! Smile

Cable routing looks impossible Frown

Posted: Jan 13, 2021 at 15:29 Quote
LeithB wrote:
Yeah I did get one.
It is as the website shows a stunning looking bike and it rides incredibly well. Very stable and confidence inspiring at high speed but easy to move around too, all the clichés.

by the sounds of it you are a very aggressive rider, I've got a HT 725 on its way soon (although its already been over 5 months (should have just built up the frame myself)) glad to know it'll be worth the wait.

Posted: Jan 14, 2021 at 2:19 Quote
tops5 wrote:
Cheers mate my frame arrived yesterday! Smile

Cable routing looks impossible Frown

Yeah I struggled with it for days.
The derailleur cable isn't as hard as you might imagine if you start from the front of the bike. Thread the outer over the inner cable then feed the inner through the frame using gravity to keep it on the correct side of the bike. The outer will end up in the top tube when the inner comes out at the other end so then you can just pull it all through. I also used a very powerful magnet which could just pick up the cable inner even through the steel.

The dropper cable had me fully stuck because it doesn't go through the bb shell but through the gusset between the seat tube and the down tube. What I did was fed some wire through the lower down bottle cage boss (on the under side of the downtube) which gives you a straight line through the gusset into the seatube. You can then attach the wire to the outer cable and pull it into the down tube. Then I detached the wire from the outer cable and pushed the outer up the down tube.

Don't forget to make sure the cables go through the little guides inside each of the ports. A spoke is good for helping to guide them through the guides.

Hope that helps, its not impossible as it may seem but it kinda is.

Posted: Jan 14, 2021 at 3:21 Quote
Thanks for that

Gear cable is sorted

I've been struggling with the dropper, got it through but guess the wrong hole as I can't get the BB centre sleeve in and the outer is horribly kinked - start again I guess, fitted the f-ing crank as well now Frown

Didn't notice the guides in the ports - will check that out ta

Posted: Jan 14, 2021 at 3:24 Quote
I got my HT 725 back in September, I added the dropper post myself as the Ribble one got a few bad reviews, after trying to fit the cable for a few hours I gave up and took it to the LBS where they did it in about an hour but said its a bit of a faf,
other than that the bike has been brilliant, handles trails really well but also great on longer all day rides,really noticed the difference when I went tubeless, rides even smoother, overall really pleased with it

Posted: Jan 18, 2021 at 7:28 Quote
LeithB wrote:
tops5 wrote:
Cheers mate my frame arrived yesterday! Smile

Cable routing looks impossible Frown

Yeah I struggled with it for days.
The derailleur cable isn't as hard as you might imagine if you start from the front of the bike. Thread the outer over the inner cable then feed the inner through the frame using gravity to keep it on the correct side of the bike. The outer will end up in the top tube when the inner comes out at the other end so then you can just pull it all through. I also used a very powerful magnet which could just pick up the cable inner even through the steel.

The dropper cable had me fully stuck because it doesn't go through the bb shell but through the gusset between the seat tube and the down tube. What I did was fed some wire through the lower down bottle cage boss (on the under side of the downtube) which gives you a straight line through the gusset into the seatube. You can then attach the wire to the outer cable and pull it into the down tube. Then I detached the wire from the outer cable and pushed the outer up the down tube.

Don't forget to make sure the cables go through the little guides inside each of the ports. A spoke is good for helping to guide them through the guides.

Hope that helps, its not impossible as it may seem but it kinda is.

Really helped thanks! Nearly there now, just gotta fit longer fork spring and connect rear brake once banjo fitting arrives Smile
90 done

Posted: Jan 19, 2021 at 1:28 Quote
Looking really good, I would be interested to know what you think of the Michelin tyres and what size you are running ?

Posted: Jan 19, 2021 at 4:54 Quote
kemo-725 wrote:
Looking really good, I would be interested to know what you think of the Michelin tyres and what size you are running ?

Love the Michelins! That's a 2.4 rear and a 2.6 Spesh Hillbilly on the front

Get 2.6 both ends my Transition Patrol - quite draggy but grip is great

Posted: Jan 22, 2021 at 1:00 Quote
Does anyone else's bike have very minimal space between the chain and the frame when you're in the highest gear, mines got a 1-2 mm gap and every now and again the chain gets caught in between the frame and the cassette which is horrible. It turns adjusting the high limit screw into a very painful task to make it only just able to get in to top gear to try and save the frame. I was just wondering if its my hub and cassette combo that's causing this or just a inherent design flaw.

Posted: Jan 22, 2021 at 1:15 Quote
never had any problems in the highest gear, never really looked at the chain gap but I am out on the bike this afternoon so will have a look and measure the gap

Just checked and it is as you say a very small gap, I've never had any problems with it so far, could it be you have a bit of play in the derailleur ?

Posted: Jan 25, 2021 at 7:42 Quote
LeithB wrote:
Does anyone else's bike have very minimal space between the chain and the frame when you're in the highest gear, mines got a 1-2 mm gap and every now and again the chain gets caught in between the frame and the cassette which is horrible. It turns adjusting the high limit screw into a very painful task to make it only just able to get in to top gear to try and save the frame. I was just wondering if its my hub and cassette combo that's causing this or just a inherent design flaw.

Had issues on the 1st ride yesterday - just assumed I'll need to tweak the limit screw

Posted: Jan 26, 2021 at 2:20 Quote
Yeah, my derailleur was very tired out but I've just got a new one as it got destroyed so I shall see if the problem still occurs.

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