The end of bent derailleur hangers?

PB Forum :: Bikes, Parts, and Gear
The end of bent derailleur hangers?
Author Message
Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 5:54 Quote
Branmuffin wrote:
Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned. Your hanger would never be perfectly straight if it can’t be bent.
Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 5:58 Quote
TibZ wrote:
What are you doing to bend them so often? I mean, this is a problem you only have (at this frequency), so there must be something in the way you ride (or setup your bike) that explains it.
Most trick riders have this problem. Hence why every trick rider on the planet is single speed. Literally every trials, street, and dirt jumper is single speed because derailleur hangers suck. A lot of riders like to do this stuff on their mountain bike, and derailleur technology is almost there. The Box 2 drivetrain 1X9 kit solves every issue except this. The last thing needed to bridge this gap is just a good hanger.. It's such a simple fix and opens so many doors. All multi-disciplinary riders would benefit substantially from this, and the average rider would benefit moderately.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 6:19 Quote
Sayshell wrote:
Branmuffin wrote:
Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned. Your hanger would never be perfectly straight if it can’t be bent.
Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

Do you own the proper tool to align a derailleur or are you just bending them with a crescent wrench? Take a proper alignment tool to any new or used bike and 80% of the time the hanger is a bit off.

Luckily this usually doesn't cause any problems, and trying to align a hanger on a working drivetrain just sounds like a great way to create a problem when there isn't one.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 6:21 Quote
Will1848 wrote:
Sayshell wrote:
Branmuffin wrote:
Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned. Your hanger would never be perfectly straight if it can’t be bent.
Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

Do you own the proper tool to align a derailleur or are you just bending them with a crescent wrench? Take a proper alignment tool to any new or used bike and 80% of the time the hanger is a bit off.

Luckily this usually doesn't cause any problems, and trying to align a hanger on a working drivetrain just sounds like a great way to create a problem when there isn't one.
Yes I have the proper tool. It's massive though and I bent it by hand if I am on the trail.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 6:27 Quote
Sayshell wrote:
Branmuffin wrote:
Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned. Your hanger would never be perfectly straight if it can’t be bent.
Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

100% fact.

I worked as a bicycle mechanic for 10 years

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 6:29 Quote
Sayshell wrote:
Will1848 wrote:
Sayshell wrote:

Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

Do you own the proper tool to align a derailleur or are you just bending them with a crescent wrench? Take a proper alignment tool to any new or used bike and 80% of the time the hanger is a bit off.

Luckily this usually doesn't cause any problems, and trying to align a hanger on a working drivetrain just sounds like a great way to create a problem when there isn't one.
Yes I have the proper tool. It's massive though and I bent it by hand if I am on the trail.

Are your hangers bending because you're hitting things with the derailleur all the time?

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 6:32 Quote
Will1848 wrote:
Sayshell wrote:
Will1848 wrote:


Do you own the proper tool to align a derailleur or are you just bending them with a crescent wrench? Take a proper alignment tool to any new or used bike and 80% of the time the hanger is a bit off.

Luckily this usually doesn't cause any problems, and trying to align a hanger on a working drivetrain just sounds like a great way to create a problem when there isn't one.
Yes I have the proper tool. It's massive though and I bent it by hand if I am on the trail.

Are your hangers bending because you're hitting things with the derailleur all the time?

That's about 30% of the reason on some really bushy trails. The box Two is an ultra long cage derailleur so it hits stuff more, and my wheels are 25" so it sits an inch closer to the ground... But even street riding, or trials, or when nothing on the trail could possibly hit it it gets bent on a variety of things.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 6:42 Quote
cmcrawfo wrote:
Sayshell wrote:
Branmuffin wrote:
Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned. Your hanger would never be perfectly straight if it can’t be bent.
Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

100% fact.

I worked as a bicycle mechanic for 10 years

I just asked an elite bike mechanic / pro rider. His answer is "usually they don't". Why do you just make up stuff like that?

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 8:33 Quote
Sayshell wrote:
Branmuffin wrote:
Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned. Your hanger would never be perfectly straight if it can’t be bent.
Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

Life experience? Working in a shop? Ask any mechanic?

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 8:35 Quote
Sayshell wrote:
cmcrawfo wrote:
Sayshell wrote:

Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

100% fact.

I worked as a bicycle mechanic for 10 years

I just asked an elite bike mechanic / pro rider. His answer is "usually they don't". Why do you just make up stuff like that?

You got nobody backing your idea, it’s ok, carry on with life. Keep bending your hangar daily or put your idea into production and get it on the shop floor. I think everyone has provided pretty realistic and credible feedback and your response has been to call them a liar. Good luck seashell.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 11:14 Quote
Branmuffin wrote:
Sayshell wrote:
Branmuffin wrote:
Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned. Your hanger would never be perfectly straight if it can’t be bent.
Source? I am deeply skeptical about that.

Life experience? Working in a shop? Ask any mechanic?

Lol I literally just did ask a mechanic at a shop and he said the exact opposite. So it's clearly not "100% fact" that "Even a new bike with a new hanger needs to be aligned." It's pretty unreasonable to conclude the operating practice of all shops anywhere based on personal experience at one shop. So he clearly is making up the practice of places he doesn't work at, as he is demonstrably wrong. If I say "All people wear glasses" then it's perfectly fine to accuse me of making up data, as clearly I didn't actually check if this is true.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 11:36 Quote
You know, keep on replying like this and you will very soon be left alone in this thread with your arrogance for only company.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 11:44 Quote
I've been carrying a spare mech hangar since 2002.

I've only every had to use it twice.

In that time I've seen 1 other hangar break and the bloke had to single speed it home.

Clearly I'm not riding hard enough! Missing all those bushes trees and the like!

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 11:51 Quote
Sayshell wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
Sayshell wrote:
[I would ask this question, what disadvantage would this system be to a normal rider?

It ignores the fact that a similar, more easily adapted, solution already exists.

Sure but that doesn't solve the issue of hangers bending. If you use a breakaway bolt the hanger can and still will bend. If you use a breakaway bolt on a chromoloy frame that is good and would probably work fine. If the bolt snaps before a hanger can bend, the force it takes to snap is so absurdly low that you would run a serious risk of the derailleur simply falling off the frame under impact.

In most cases, yes, it would. Hangers bend because a force on the derailleur has considerable leverage on the hanger, via the derailleur. If the derailleur breaks off at a level below the damage threshold for the hanger, the issue of bent hangers largely disappears.

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 12:47 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Sayshell wrote:
R-M-R wrote:


It ignores the fact that a similar, more easily adapted, solution already exists.

Sure but that doesn't solve the issue of hangers bending. If you use a breakaway bolt the hanger can and still will bend. If you use a breakaway bolt on a chromoloy frame that is good and would probably work fine. If the bolt snaps before a hanger can bend, the force it takes to snap is so absurdly low that you would run a serious risk of the derailleur simply falling off the frame under impact.

In most cases, yes, it would. Hangers bend because a force on the derailleur has considerable leverage on the hanger, via the derailleur. If the derailleur breaks off at a level below the damage threshold for the hanger, the issue of bent hangers largely disappears.

Right, but then wouldn't that lower the break away point substantially? Let's say it takes 20lbs of force to snap a normal hanger, and 15 to bend it. Then the bolt must be around 12lbs to snap to ensure it doesn't bend the hanger.
Now the break away point for the derailleur has been dropped from 20lbs of force to 12. This is bad, the hanger can break off too easily now.
Wouldn't it make more sense to use a bolt that takes 20lbs of force to snap, and raise the hanger to 25lbs to bend and 30 to snap? (We are assuming 20 lbs of force is safe and won't damage the frame, as that is already the current break away point). Again these numbers are made up, but you get what I am saying? The idea I am presenting is basically just this. Doesn't have to be chromoloy, even a high grade aluminum would probably work if people are worried about weight.

And thanks for actually providing a reasonable response. I just want to have a normal discussion like this.


 
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.007464
Mobile Version of Website