Norco Sight - Carbon or Aluminium?

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Norco Sight - Carbon or Aluminium?
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Posted: Dec 4, 2020 at 21:15 Quote
Looking at the 2020/1 Norco sights.

Kind of have my eye on the A1 or C2.

Is it me or are they both similar in weight? It appears they are from the online digging I have done. Both seem to be around 15kg (33lbs) so for in my books the A1 would be a pretty good build for the price. I am about 100kg (220lbs) so I feel like the Alu offering may be more suited to me.

Anyone else feel the same?

Posted: Dec 4, 2020 at 21:28 Quote
I'm in the same boat as you, but I was looking at the A1 vs A2 vs C3 (can't afford the C2 Frown )

Posted: Dec 4, 2020 at 21:52 Quote
Yeah, I don’t feel that C2 is worth that extra money though with the spec of the A1 being pretty good.

Interesting, we don’t get the C3 in Australia.

My feeling is that the alu versions would be more durable considering that they weigh roughly the same as the carbon versions

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 0:06 Quote
rawmouth wrote:
My feeling is that the alu versions would be more durable considering that they weigh roughly the same as the carbon versions

I don't understand your reasoning here, I would have the opposite gut feeling: for a similar weight, carbon should be more durable (usually carbon frames are lighter, so here either the carbon frames are a bit overbuilt, or the aluminium ones are using less material than the competition, potentially leading to a not so durable construction).

I might be all wrong, just wondering.

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 2:06 Quote
Personally I would always buy the carbon option, whether that is the logical choice or not is down for debate.... One thing to think about is a lot of parts on the higher spec alloy build will be wearable items, cassette, chainring, chain, brake pads, pedals, tyres...even rims and spokes at some point that you will have to replace and probably upgrade in the future anyway, this is not taking into account general upgrades and damaged parts you may need to swap out. Whereas the frame itself hopefully is going to last you the life of the bike and once all the components are wearing out and you come to sell the bike, it's the carbon one that is likely to retain more of it's value.

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 4:24 Quote
TibZ wrote:
rawmouth wrote:
My feeling is that the alu versions would be more durable considering that they weigh roughly the same as the carbon versions

I don't understand your reasoning here, I would have the opposite gut feeling: for a similar weight, carbon should be more durable (usually carbon frames are lighter, so here either the carbon frames are a bit overbuilt, or the aluminium ones are using less material than the competition, potentially leading to a not so durable construction).

I might be all wrong, just wondering.

You do raise valid point but I guess if the alu frame has a dent I’m ok with that and if carbon has a scratch I would be inclined to doubt whether it’s still ok if you know what I mean? Or has that whole myth been debunked...

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 4:29 Quote
Danzzz88 wrote:
Personally I would always buy the carbon option, whether that is the logical choice or not is down for debate.... One thing to think about is a lot of parts on the higher spec alloy build will be wearable items, cassette, chainring, chain, brake pads, pedals, tyres...even rims and spokes at some point that you will have to replace and probably upgrade in the future anyway, this is not taking into account general upgrades and damaged parts you may need to swap out. Whereas the frame itself hopefully is going to last you the life of the bike and once all the components are wearing out and you come to sell the bike, it's the carbon one that is likely to retain more of it's value.

The thing about the C2 and A1 build is that they are largely the same other than the frame and a couple of minor parts and $1000 more for the carbon. But in all other cases your comment is spot on


1000 bucks is a lot of beer or parts!

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 4:43 Quote
Ahh tbh I've not seen the actual spec of the bikes just assumed you were comparing a mid spec carbon bike to a high spec alloy one for the same price. In this case then you won't notice any difference between the two bikes performance wise, I mean I like carbon, it's just a nice luxury but not a neccessity for performance on a burly enduro bike, again the carbon one will hold it's value a bit better but on the other hand you are paying more initially so it will probably end up the same loss in the end depending how long you keep the bike. You could throw that $1000 towards a nice lightweight carbon wheelset to be fair that will gain you more performance benefit than a carbon frame and can be transferred to your next bike later down the line if you keep them in good condition.

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 5:03 Quote
Danzzz88 wrote:
Ahh tbh I've not seen the actual spec of the bikes just assumed you were comparing a mid spec carbon bike to a high spec alloy one for the same price. In this case then you won't notice any difference between the two bikes performance wise, I mean I like carbon, it's just a nice luxury but not a neccessity for performance on a burly enduro bike, again the carbon one will hold it's value a bit better but on the other hand you are paying more initially so it will probably end up the same loss in the end depending how long you keep the bike. You could throw that $1000 towards a nice lightweight carbon wheelset to be fair that will gain you more performance benefit than a carbon frame and can be transferred to your next bike later down the line if you keep them in good condition.

Carbon wheels, good shout! Never thought of that

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 8:07 Quote
The question always has to be: "What does X do that Y doesn't do?"

In the case of an off-the-shelf carbon vs. aluminum frame, not much. Saves a bit of weight in the least valuable place to save weight. You will get better return on investment with that money by buying front tires more frequently, upgrading the suspension, or upgrading the wheels. Or, looking beyond the bike, working less and riding more.

Posted: Dec 5, 2020 at 20:08 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
The question always has to be: "What does X do that Y doesn't do?"

In the case of an off-the-shelf carbon vs. aluminum frame, not much. Saves a bit of weight in the least valuable place to save weight. You will get better return on investment with that money by buying front tires more frequently, upgrading the suspension, or upgrading the wheels. Or, looking beyond the bike, working less and riding more.

Indeed, these are valid points as well. I think the main one that I can relate to is working less and riding more...

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