Is riding on wet trails really that bad?

PB Forum :: Trail Building
Is riding on wet trails really that bad?
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Message
Posted: Dec 15, 2020 at 10:58 Quote
Is riding on wet trails really that bad? Consider the following:

Squamish has some of the best riders in the world, and it rains a lot. They must ride in the rain/wet, but every video I've seen their trails look amazing.

Maxxis makes 14 different tires classified as being for "wet". I just counted.

I understand that riding flow trails or jump trails with lots of man-made berms when wet is bad.

It seems to me the people who complain about riding wet trails are mad because 1) they might get wet 2) they might have to use tires that weigh more than 500g, or 3) when they hit a mud puddle it slows down their Strava segment times.

What do you trail builders think? BTW I maintain many of my local trails.

Posted: Dec 15, 2020 at 12:08 Quote
avatar4281 wrote:
Is riding on wet trails really that bad? Consider the following:

Squamish has some of the best riders in the world, and it rains a lot. They must ride in the rain/wet, but every video I've seen their trails look amazing.

Maxxis makes 14 different tires classified as being for "wet". I just counted.

I understand that riding flow trails or jump trails with lots of man-made berms when wet is bad.

It seems to me the people who complain about riding wet trails are mad because 1) they might get wet 2) they might have to use tires that weigh more than 500g, or 3) when they hit a mud puddle it slows down their Strava segment times.

What do you trail builders think? BTW I maintain many of my local trails.

Much of this depends on the region and the conditions. Here on the front range of CO, trails that are wet but most of the moisture has been absorbed into the ground leads to some pretty fantastic riding and has no negative impact on the trail. When there are large or deep puddles, or muddy spots, riding through them can lead to lots of deep cuts in the trail. Also, riders end up carrying a lot of the trail into the parking lots on their bikes and clothing, thus removing otherwise good soil from he trail, which is an issue here in our arid climate. Large puddles also lead many riders to go around the water which widens the singletrack, (the worst sin of all)

Posted: Dec 15, 2020 at 13:05 Quote
I'll be another voice for "It depends on the area." Front range CO dirt turns into sticky mud when wet and trails get really torn up. From all the videos of PNW riding I've seen, I've not seen wet, sticky mud yet. The desert is another area where wet riding doesn't really matter. Growing up in MS, riding in the wet meant you were really causing problems with the clay and tearing up the trail.

Posted: Dec 18, 2020 at 13:54 Quote
DanMG wrote:
avatar4281 wrote:
Is riding on wet trails really that bad? Consider the following:

Squamish has some of the best riders in the world, and it rains a lot. They must ride in the rain/wet, but every video I've seen their trails look amazing.

Maxxis makes 14 different tires classified as being for "wet". I just counted.

I understand that riding flow trails or jump trails with lots of man-made berms when wet is bad.

It seems to me the people who complain about riding wet trails are mad because 1) they might get wet 2) they might have to use tires that weigh more than 500g, or 3) when they hit a mud puddle it slows down their Strava segment times.

What do you trail builders think? BTW I maintain many of my local trails.

Much of this depends on the region and the conditions. Here on the front range of CO, trails that are wet but most of the moisture has been absorbed into the ground leads to some pretty fantastic riding and has no negative impact on the trail. When there are large or deep puddles, or muddy spots, riding through them can lead to lots of deep cuts in the trail. Also, riders end up carrying a lot of the trail into the parking lots on their bikes and clothing, thus removing otherwise good soil from he trail, which is an issue here in our arid climate. Large puddles also lead many riders to go around the water which widens the singletrack, (the worst sin of all)

So if there is a puddle should i just ride through it since riding around is worse?

Posted: Dec 18, 2020 at 14:23 Quote
Ismael1223 wrote:
DanMG wrote:
avatar4281 wrote:
Is riding on wet trails really that bad? Consider the following:

Squamish has some of the best riders in the world, and it rains a lot. They must ride in the rain/wet, but every video I've seen their trails look amazing.

Maxxis makes 14 different tires classified as being for "wet". I just counted.

I understand that riding flow trails or jump trails with lots of man-made berms when wet is bad.

It seems to me the people who complain about riding wet trails are mad because 1) they might get wet 2) they might have to use tires that weigh more than 500g, or 3) when they hit a mud puddle it slows down their Strava segment times.

What do you trail builders think? BTW I maintain many of my local trails.

Much of this depends on the region and the conditions. Here on the front range of CO, trails that are wet but most of the moisture has been absorbed into the ground leads to some pretty fantastic riding and has no negative impact on the trail. When there are large or deep puddles, or muddy spots, riding through them can lead to lots of deep cuts in the trail. Also, riders end up carrying a lot of the trail into the parking lots on their bikes and clothing, thus removing otherwise good soil from he trail, which is an issue here in our arid climate. Large puddles also lead many riders to go around the water which widens the singletrack, (the worst sin of all)

So if there is a puddle should i just ride through it since riding around is worse?

Yes, ride through the puddles and stay on the trail. Keep singletrack single.

Posted: Dec 18, 2020 at 18:48 Quote
DanMG wrote:
Ismael1223 wrote:
DanMG wrote:


Much of this depends on the region and the conditions. Here on the front range of CO, trails that are wet but most of the moisture has been absorbed into the ground leads to some pretty fantastic riding and has no negative impact on the trail. When there are large or deep puddles, or muddy spots, riding through them can lead to lots of deep cuts in the trail. Also, riders end up carrying a lot of the trail into the parking lots on their bikes and clothing, thus removing otherwise good soil from he trail, which is an issue here in our arid climate. Large puddles also lead many riders to go around the water which widens the singletrack, (the worst sin of all)

So if there is a puddle should i just ride through it since riding around is worse?

Yes, ride through the puddles and stay on the trail. Keep singletrack single.
Ok I’ll ride through them. I don’t mind getting muddy anyway, I’m gonna have to shower either way

Posted: Jan 5, 2021 at 15:25 Quote
Around me, It is wet nearly year round and most of the trails are made of glacial till, so it drains fairly well. However, I find that newer trails tend to get very muddy because the dirt isn't as packed in. I recently built a step-up and after 3 or 4 times of hitting it a massive rut developed up it.

Posted: Jan 6, 2021 at 7:16 Quote
Totally depends on where you live in my opinion and the type of soil/ground you are riding. Riding Freeze-Thaw conditions in the Northeast can do some serious damage on a lot of trails. I've ridden in other countries on trails that are wet while it is raining that have absolutely no sign of wear or tread when riding.

I think the other thing that comes into play is who is maintaining the trails? Is it a paid system with dedicated staff or is it husbands and dads taking time away from their family to volunteer in an areas with a lack of available volunteers. It makes a difference.

Posted: Jan 13, 2021 at 10:30 Quote
avatar4281 wrote:
Is riding on wet trails really that bad? Consider the following:

Squamish has some of the best riders in the world, and it rains a lot. They must ride in the rain/wet, but every video I've seen their trails look amazing.

Maxxis makes 14 different tires classified as being for "wet". I just counted.

I understand that riding flow trails or jump trails with lots of man-made berms when wet is bad.

It seems to me the people who complain about riding wet trails are mad because 1) they might get wet 2) they might have to use tires that weigh more than 500g, or 3) when they hit a mud puddle it slows down their Strava segment times.

What do you trail builders think? BTW I maintain many of my local trails.
In England most people (I don’t know anyone that doesn’t) rides all year round as the trails are never fully dry in the north at least. I always try to stay on the trail and not to go to far off and cause errosion and just help make them run smoother with abit of digging and no one can complain at that

Posted: Jan 24, 2021 at 21:58 Quote
Believe it or not even in the Rainforest of Squamish riding in the wèt can be bad, although often it is not. Its totally circumstantial. New trails, regardless of where they are, don't typically fare well in the rain. Until a trail is bedded in well and the tread is predominantly undisturbed structural soil; saturated conditions are very harmful. It is an even bigger problem because of the number of riders. Soft trails continuously get torn apart and holes form. We ride in the rain all the time, but ethical riders pick which trails to ride and which ones to avoid.

Posted: Jan 24, 2021 at 23:07 Quote
Even here in Southern California it depends on the trail system. There are certain trails that cannot be ridden in the rain, but if I drive 10-15 minutes further I can get to a trail system that can be ridden in a rainstorm. Eventually when the trails are soft the tires leave impressions in the soil which ultimately pool and channel water leading to ruts.

Posted: Jun 14, 2021 at 22:22 Quote
Yes. Depends on the trail.

http://torca.ca/riding-in-the-wet/

Posted: Aug 26, 2021 at 11:56 Quote
Depends on the trail, dirt & type of trail.
Sand is fine pretty much all weather, clay is polar opposite- any water & its a slip & slide which gets destroyed by wet tyres.
If they're "natural" cut in trails or lines then fair dos, your probably helping. If its stacked & built then no, it will damage hours of hard work.
At the end of the day its completely dependent on where & what your riding

Posted: Sep 4, 2021 at 16:34 Quote
It all depends on the trail. But personally I love techy black or double black trails that get big ruts in them from all the riding. The more its ridden the more difficult it becomes, and thats what those trails should be all about.

Previous Page | Next Page

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.006250
Mobile Version of Website