Brake upgrade?

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Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 16:36 Quote
I put the front Code R on today. Hard to tell much difference so far in the driveway. Not sure if thats just because its flat ground or if there's something not right (needs a bleed? Prev owner didn't bed in properly?)

They look like the most recent version and were in good shape with fairly new looking pads, guy said they came off a 2020 Kona.

Will have to cut the rear line to internally route it so I'm trying to decide if I buy a bleed kit and learn to do it myself or just take it to a shop to have the whole rear brake installed and bled there.

Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 17:22 Quote
Now I'm wondering if mismatched what was the rear rotor to the front caliper which would mean they aren't bedded into each other. Would some hard riding bed it in or would I need new pads? Works ok but even adjusted all the way it seems like it is fairly close to the bar to lock it up...

Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 17:51 Quote
Frdbronco8 wrote:
Now I'm wondering if mismatched what was the rear rotor to the front caliper which would mean they aren't bedded into each other. Would some hard riding bed it in or would I need new pads? Works ok but even adjusted all the way it seems like it is fairly close to the bar to lock it up...

Yes you may need a bleed. New bikes or brake sets often do - and, if you need to route that rear hose anyways, might as well give it a shot. You may find that routing a brake hose is difficult and may require you pulling out the fork to more easily get the hose out and routed once you run it up the downtube.

If you're mechanically minded/willing to learn, it's worth giving it a shot. General tips: spring for the avid/sram pro bleed kit. It's worth it over the universal ones, which tend to pop fittings and not do you any favors while working on sram kits. You'll need a bleeding edge adapter for the caliper, a stealthamajig for after cutting the line, a set of sharp angle snips to get the cable cut perfectly straight. You should use a fresh, sealed bottle of dot fluid any time you're doing a full system flush. You can cheat and use an older bottle for "lever bleeds," but once opened, those little bottles take on air/water rapidly. Have lots of paper towels on standby, and a spray bottle with water with a little iso or AP cleaner will get the dot fluid off.

Enjoy a comical look at how to bleed sram brakes. What they're saying is accurate, though. Also, keep a tutorial pulled up on your phone to go step-by-step. You may need to repeat the whole process or parts of the process to get a perfect bleed. Also, it takes a relative ton of experience to get comfortable bleeding sram brakes due to how many steps there are, and how many things could go wrong on the first time. But - bike shops are booked weeks out and will happily take (lots) of your money to fix your mistakes on this.

Yes, they could be bedded in poorly, but no, swapping rotors back and forth shouldn't be a huge deal. Take a look at the pads and rotors - do they have a glossy, glazed over look? If so, a light sanding will expose fresh surface and you can re-bed them in. If not, hammering on them while riding some of those killer trails should get those brakes happy again. It's very easy to over-clean braking surfaces, and even easier to contaminate them. I find that keeping dirt out of the caliper and generally ignoring that they exist (except for a full system bleed and a couple maintenance lever bleeds per season) works great.

Posted: Jan 20, 2021 at 21:53 Quote
Great info, I will pick up the Sram kit. Used to working on cars and motorcycles and am still amazed at how different everything is.

Posted: Jan 21, 2021 at 8:56 Quote
Frdbronco8 wrote:
Great info, I will pick up the Sram kit. Used to working on cars and motorcycles and am still amazed at how different everything is.

The number of specialized tools and ever changing standards will drive you insane at first. Then you just give in and drink more.

If the rotors and pads are contaminated, clean them as best you can and start fresh with bedding them in properly. I have gone to town on contaminated pads with emery cloth to get them clean. I have also had to take an emery cloth to rotors too. If you have used resin pads on a rotor and then are trying to switch to sintered pads, it may never bed in properly. Some have had that experience and others haven't.

Squirting water on the caliper during bedding in process will help the process.

Posted: Jan 22, 2021 at 22:16 Quote
Bought the sram kit and followed the videos to the letter but the rear still seems pretty soft.... I have the level adjusted out all the way and I still come pretty close to my knuckle before it locks up. Is that normal? Front is a little better but I'm still surprised that its at at its farthest out adjustment.

Posted: Jan 23, 2021 at 0:22 Quote
The rear can often feel softer as the hose is longer. When you squeeze the lever under high braking loads there will be a very small amount of expansion of the hose. Because it is longer and the amount of fluid in the system is so small the slight elasticity in the hose is noticeable.

This should not be anything to do with the lever coming back to the bar. That suggests there is still some air in the system somewhere.

Posted: Jan 23, 2021 at 8:49 Quote
Frdbronco8 wrote:
Bought the sram kit and followed the videos to the letter but the rear still seems pretty soft.... I have the level adjusted out all the way and I still come pretty close to my knuckle before it locks up. Is that normal? Front is a little better but I'm still surprised that its at at its farthest out adjustment.

A middle reach position should have the contact point be parallel to the bar. Since the brakes are new and pads aren’t worn (you should still check) it means you didn’t bleed them properly - or like I’d said at one point, they may need more than one bleed.

Posted: Jan 23, 2021 at 15:52 Quote
The rack i set the bike on to bleed it tipped the front end down a bit. I did it again, this time with the front end way higher than the rear and it made a big difference. Was still squealing and chattering so I worked all of the pistons out a ways and cleaned them and that seemed to fix that issue as well. Thanks for all the help! Rode Tiger mountain today and had a blast

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