Riding headphones recommendations

PB Forum :: All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country
Riding headphones recommendations
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Posted: Mar 18, 2021 at 6:05 Quote
dontrideontheroads wrote:
I get annoyed as much as anyone else about people being unaware of their surroundings while out on the trail. I never play music at a volume that means I can't hear what's around me, and I specifically want headphones that will let me hear the surrounding sounds.

But thanks for bringing your agro to my friendly suggestions thread Big Grin

It's partly that reasons that I'm very curious about the bone conducting headphones, but am worried about how they'll fit inside my full face helmet. My riding is about 50/50 open face & full face helmets, so ideally I want something that will work with both

If you do go the bone conducting route tell me how it goes. I plan on getting a full face helmet and this thought never crossed my mind

Posted: Mar 18, 2021 at 7:34 Quote
I use Aftershokz. They don't go in your ear, they are bone conducting so I can hear what is going on around me and music. They fit inside a full face and half shell helmet no problem.

Posted: Mar 18, 2021 at 9:41 Quote
dontrideontheroads wrote:
I get annoyed as much as anyone else about people being unaware of their surroundings while out on the trail. I never play music at a volume that means I can't hear what's around me, and I specifically want headphones that will let me hear the surrounding sounds.

But thanks for bringing your agro to my friendly suggestions thread Big Grin

It's partly that reasons that I'm very curious about the bone conducting headphones, but am worried about how they'll fit inside my full face helmet. My riding is about 50/50 open face & full face helmets, so ideally I want something that will work with both

I use them using a Bell Super R (or something like that.. cant remmeber exact model) and have no issues.
Best thing is you can hear the surroundings.. but ONLY if you dont set the volume to high. Else, is like if you're in a Disco with loud music,

Best way to describe the Aeropex feeling, is like having ambient music. Actually thats exactly what I felt.
When I first tried them, it was in a Mall, and as soon as I put them on, I thought they were not working, but that the mall had ambient music. Turned out they where the Headphones, and the music was in my head

Posted: Mar 18, 2021 at 14:36 Quote
I can see how bone-conduction type could work:
Generally small profile so should be clear of the helmet
Are supposed to not interfere with ambient sound
The method of wearing them means they are secure.

I don't know anyone who has used them (on or off a bike!)

Posted: Mar 18, 2021 at 14:42 Quote
mark-p wrote:
I can see how bone-conduction type could work:
Generally small profile so should be clear of the helmet
Are supposed to not interfere with ambient sound
The method of wearing them means they are secure.

I don't know anyone who has used them (on or off a bike!)
probably me being wrong but surly constant vibrations through your bones isn’t very good for them?

Posted: Mar 18, 2021 at 20:07 Quote
nojzilla wrote:
HaggeredShins wrote:
Dkutassy wrote:
I've literally had to yell nearly at the top of my lungs approaching hikers and bikers from behind while they had earbuds in. Some of them I couldn't get their attention at all and they get startled when I pass them in a wide section. Then they give me the stink eye like I'm the problem.

It's horribly inconsiderate to other trail users. If you want to play music on single track trails you NEED to hear your surroundings if there's going to be other trail users around.

So what are you going to do with a deaf rider or hiker, especially when you aren't aware of it? Scream more at the top of your lungs? Ask them not to ride or hike because they can't hear their surroundings?

Everyone is responsible for being a diligent user on trail. Riding with headphones is neither inconsiderate nor irresponsible on its own. Someone can certainly be aware while listening to music as equally as they could being deaf -- don't paint with a broad stroke, its f*cking ridiculous.

OPs thread also isn't about this petty soapbox BS, either.

Have to agree, when I come up on slower riders at my local I see the responsibility is mine to pass considerately an when it's safe. Just like driving, you don't just plow past a slower car... you wait untill it's safe for all (well, most of us do)
That being said, If I'm riding with buds in I only have one

It’s illegal to wear headphones while driving a car, in the states at least, for the exact reason that you are not aware of your surroundings.

Posted: Mar 18, 2021 at 20:48 Quote
Kevindhansen wrote:
nojzilla wrote:
HaggeredShins wrote:


So what are you going to do with a deaf rider or hiker, especially when you aren't aware of it? Scream more at the top of your lungs? Ask them not to ride or hike because they can't hear their surroundings?

Everyone is responsible for being a diligent user on trail. Riding with headphones is neither inconsiderate nor irresponsible on its own. Someone can certainly be aware while listening to music as equally as they could being deaf -- don't paint with a broad stroke, its f*cking ridiculous.

OPs thread also isn't about this petty soapbox BS, either.


Have to agree, when I come up on slower riders at my local I see the responsibility is mine to pass considerately an when it's safe. Just like driving, you don't just plow past a slower car... you wait untill it's safe for all (well, most of us do)
That being said, If I'm riding with buds in I only have one

It’s illegal to wear headphones while driving a car, in the states at least, for the exact reason that you are not aware of your surroundings.
Isn't the point of this thread asking which bone conduction headphones are best? Those ones just wouldn't mess with hearing other riders.

Posted: Mar 19, 2021 at 4:57 Quote
I use some Trelab XR500 blue tooth earphones. In ear and loop over the top of the ear. Cheap, can be paused with one press and has a cord around the back of the neck so I can leave an ear free if it's high traffic areas.

I tend to listen on fire roads & climbs and pause it on the fast fun sections.

Posted: Mar 19, 2021 at 8:30 Quote
One of the guys at work has a pair of these he uses when out walking

https://aftershokz.co.uk/products/air

He says they are quite good at staying in place and don't block the ears however even at moderate volumes, if there is a lot of external noise like traffic it overwhelms what you are listening to.

Now the down side, they are not fully waterproof so he only uses them when it is dry If you do get sweaty then they can slide/become uncomfortable although that maybe down to his shape.

Looking at him wearing them over a Teams meeting there is a significant loop at the back that needs to be under the helmet.

Not a bike users but someone who does use this type of device.

Posted: Mar 19, 2021 at 13:43 Quote
I ride with one earbud in. That way I can listen to tunes / podcasts and also be aware of what’s happening. I have to agree that if you make the choice to listen to music while hiking / riding you should commit to being aware of your surroundings. Trails are busier than ever so people need to be responsible trail users. I use some cheap earbuds.

Posted: Mar 20, 2021 at 3:59 Quote
HaggeredShins wrote:
Dkutassy wrote:
I've literally had to yell nearly at the top of my lungs approaching hikers and bikers from behind while they had earbuds in. Some of them I couldn't get their attention at all and they get startled when I pass them in a wide section. Then they give me the stink eye like I'm the problem.

It's horribly inconsiderate to other trail users. If you want to play music on single track trails you NEED to hear your surroundings if there's going to be other trail users around.

So what are you going to do with a deaf rider or hiker, especially when you aren't aware of it? Scream more at the top of your lungs? Ask them not to ride or hike because they can't hear their surroundings?

Everyone is responsible for being a diligent user on trail. Riding with headphones is neither inconsiderate nor irresponsible on its own. Someone can certainly be aware while listening to music as equally as they could being deaf -- don't paint with a broad stroke, its f*cking ridiculous.

OPs thread also isn't about this petty soapbox BS, either.

We actually have a deaf hiker around here that I've interacted with quite a few times. She understands it's a problem that she can't hear people coming up behind her and wear a vest that says "deaf" on the back of it. Just wait for a wide spot and politely pass around the side and she politely waves as you go by.

This isn't how it works with someone wearing two earbuds where I typically use the same technique to pass when I can't get their attention. When I wait for a wide spot to go around they get startled most of the time and give me an attitude like I did something wrong. In reality their lack of awareness on trails is the problem, not my riding or how I was passing.

I have no problem with people using one ear bud and I do it occasionally. It's enough to hear if someone's yelling to get your attention. Bone conduction seems like it would be an awesome solution. I'm glad to see the OP is taking other trail users into consideration with how he's listening to music instead of being an oblivious jerk that no one likes interacting with on the trail.

OP if you find the bone conduction ones won't work with full face there are a ton of great wireless earbuds now for about $40usd. The sport ones have a loop over the ear and there's no wire so you can use a single earbud.

Posted: Mar 20, 2021 at 7:20 Quote
Dkutassy wrote:
We actually have a deaf hiker around here that I've interacted with quite a few times. She understands it's a problem that she can't hear people coming up behind her and wear a vest that says "deaf" on the back of it. Just wait for a wide spot and politely pass around the side and she politely waves as you go by.

This isn't how it works with someone wearing two earbuds where I typically use the same technique to pass when I can't get their attention. When I wait for a wide spot to go around they get startled most of the time and give me an attitude like I did something wrong. In reality their lack of awareness on trails is the problem, not my riding or how I was passing.

I have no problem with people using one ear bud and I do it occasionally. It's enough to hear if someone's yelling to get your attention. Bone conduction seems like it would be an awesome solution. I'm glad to see the OP is taking other trail users into consideration with how he's listening to music instead of being an oblivious jerk that no one likes interacting with on the trail.

OP if you find the bone conduction ones won't work with full face there are a ton of great wireless earbuds now for about $40usd. The sport ones have a loop over the ear and there's no wire so you can use a single earbud.

Oh come on, with the 'my deaf friend' education. I've worked with a few deaf riders so I'm well aware of how this plays out in reality. You're deliberately evading the point for the sake of arguing.

Its pretty clear you have a vendetta against people riding with headphones -- you aren't even in the thread for its topic, you're here arguing the alleged universal idiosyncrasies of riders listening to music according to your own personal worldview on 'trail etiquette'. If you truly have bad interactions with a remarkable number of people you pass riding with headphones, maybe its time for some introspection on your own behavior. If only the occasional person gives you some lip and you factually did all the right things, what's so hard about riding on?

Posted: Mar 20, 2021 at 8:33 Quote
HaggeredShins wrote:
Dkutassy wrote:
We actually have a deaf hiker around here that I've interacted with quite a few times. She understands it's a problem that she can't hear people coming up behind her and wear a vest that says "deaf" on the back of it. Just wait for a wide spot and politely pass around the side and she politely waves as you go by.

This isn't how it works with someone wearing two earbuds where I typically use the same technique to pass when I can't get their attention. When I wait for a wide spot to go around they get startled most of the time and give me an attitude like I did something wrong. In reality their lack of awareness on trails is the problem, not my riding or how I was passing.

I have no problem with people using one ear bud and I do it occasionally. It's enough to hear if someone's yelling to get your attention. Bone conduction seems like it would be an awesome solution. I'm glad to see the OP is taking other trail users into consideration with how he's listening to music instead of being an oblivious jerk that no one likes interacting with on the trail.

OP if you find the bone conduction ones won't work with full face there are a ton of great wireless earbuds now for about $40usd. The sport ones have a loop over the ear and there's no wire so you can use a single earbud.

Oh come on, with the 'my deaf friend' education. I've worked with a few deaf riders so I'm well aware of how this plays out in reality. You're deliberately evading the point for the sake of arguing.

Its pretty clear you have a vendetta against people riding with headphones -- you aren't even in the thread for its topic, you're here arguing the alleged universal idiosyncrasies of riders listening to music according to your own personal worldview on 'trail etiquette'. If you truly have bad interactions with a remarkable number of people you pass riding with headphones, maybe its time for some introspection on your own behavior. If only the occasional person gives you some lip and you factually did all the right things, what's so hard about riding on?

It'ss absolutely on topic when someone is looking for a way to listen to music while on the trails and I did give my suggestion. I DO pass safely in every situation, I ALWAYS stop for other trail users and yeild to uphill mountain bikers. It's strange that you'd assume without knowing anything about me that I'm passing people dangerously.

It is absolutely everywhere that headphone use on trail goes against basic trail etiquette. It's also the same for each user group.

https://news.extension.uconn.edu/2020/05/01/headphone-etiquette-on-the-trail/#

#3
https://blog.mapmyrun.com/the-unspoken-rules-of-trail-running/

Listed under "give audible warning"
https://www.ibike.org/education/trail-sharing-guidelines.htm

Posted: Mar 20, 2021 at 8:57 Quote
Dkutassy wrote:
HaggeredShins wrote:
Dkutassy wrote:
We actually have a deaf hiker around here that I've interacted with quite a few times. She understands it's a problem that she can't hear people coming up behind her and wear a vest that says "deaf" on the back of it. Just wait for a wide spot and politely pass around the side and she politely waves as you go by.

This isn't how it works with someone wearing two earbuds where I typically use the same technique to pass when I can't get their attention. When I wait for a wide spot to go around they get startled most of the time and give me an attitude like I did something wrong. In reality their lack of awareness on trails is the problem, not my riding or how I was passing.

I have no problem with people using one ear bud and I do it occasionally. It's enough to hear if someone's yelling to get your attention. Bone conduction seems like it would be an awesome solution. I'm glad to see the OP is taking other trail users into consideration with how he's listening to music instead of being an oblivious jerk that no one likes interacting with on the trail.

OP if you find the bone conduction ones won't work with full face there are a ton of great wireless earbuds now for about $40usd. The sport ones have a loop over the ear and there's no wire so you can use a single earbud.

Oh come on, with the 'my deaf friend' education. I've worked with a few deaf riders so I'm well aware of how this plays out in reality. You're deliberately evading the point for the sake of arguing.

Its pretty clear you have a vendetta against people riding with headphones -- you aren't even in the thread for its topic, you're here arguing the alleged universal idiosyncrasies of riders listening to music according to your own personal worldview on 'trail etiquette'. If you truly have bad interactions with a remarkable number of people you pass riding with headphones, maybe its time for some introspection on your own behavior. If only the occasional person gives you some lip and you factually did all the right things, what's so hard about riding on?

It'ss absolutely on topic when someone is looking for a way to listen to music while on the trails and I did give my suggestion. I DO pass safely in every situation, I ALWAYS stop for other trail users and yeild to uphill mountain bikers. It's strange that you'd assume without knowing anything about me that I'm passing people dangerously.

It is absolutely everywhere that headphone use on trail goes against basic trail etiquette. It's also the same for each user group.

https://news.extension.uconn.edu/2020/05/01/headphone-etiquette-on-the-trail/#

#3
https://blog.mapmyrun.com/the-unspoken-rules-of-trail-running/

Listed under "give audible warning"
https://www.ibike.org/education/trail-sharing-guidelines.htm
none of you guys are helping the poor bloke find the best headphones

Posted: Mar 20, 2021 at 8:59 Quote
I sometimes use Jaybird Vista's, BUT I only ride with one in at a time so I'm still aware of my surroundings.

Very secure and I've never had one fall out on me. Haven't tried with a full face, but they're fairly low profile so I imagine they'd be ok.


 
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