What bike can do enduro and dirt jumps?

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What bike can do enduro and dirt jumps?
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Posted: Aug 30, 2021 at 15:49 Quote
Commencal clash...

Posted: Aug 30, 2021 at 18:11 Quote
lokomonkey wrote:
Commencal clash...
If you can get one...

Posted: Jul 8, 2022 at 0:24 Quote
2020 scott ransom set up as 27.5

Posted: Jul 8, 2022 at 0:25 Quote
2020 scott ransom set up as 27.5

Posted: Jul 8, 2022 at 0:58 Quote
Any enduro bike that doesn't feel too long or sluggish and still remain easily maneuverable ...So I would say 27,5 with short chainstays and an average reach, and without a stupid slack HTA (something around 65° would be a nice compromise for fun/stability)

Posted: Jul 8, 2022 at 7:05 Quote
cool topic. Pretty much any modern enduro bike will jump well. The issue is the size of the jumps and how much speed you can build and if you need to pump to get speed.

A modern enduro bike is a brawler, so that means they tend to come into their own at higher speeds, good technique, and/or more aggressive/deliberate/refined rider input.

In any case, if you mean enduro that means a bike that is at least 160/150. There are bikes in that range that jump really well. I would look for a bike with shorter chainstays and a 27.5 or mullett. If it is a well designed bike, you can send both rowdy trails and rowdy jumps on a 150mm bike with one or two smaller wheels. Also check out online reviews; the reviewer should clarify how well a particular enduro bike jibs or handles slower speeds and tighter maneuvering. The industry standard with top end enduro bikes is really impressive in terms of how well rounded they are.

I bought my last bike, a SC Bronson V3 wanting to both jump and ride rowdy trails. It has chainstays 430mm, 160/150 travel, 65 head tube angle, 27.5 wheels, 490 reach in the size XL. For me, this bike has been a really good compromise between jumpability and trail capability.

Posted: Jul 12, 2022 at 22:02 Quote
Joining in this discussion as I'm directly interested in the exact question being asked here.

A bit of backstory. I have a 2014 Kona Hei Hei (https://2014.konaworld.com/hei_hei.cfm) and over time I've changed every single part on it except the frame and shock.

Initially it came with 29 wheels but I've changed them with 27.5 ones with bigger 2.6 tires. The fork is a Fox 36 with 160mm travel.

Riding it harder and on jumps it feels weird. Standing on the pedals it feels I'm too high and too forward. I don't know if it's me because I've taken almost a 15 year break since riding DH or I messed up the geometry.

How bad is this holding me back with the tiny rear travel and completely different purpose geometry if I keep riding it on flow and jump trails. Btw, the jumps feel like they throw me forward way too much... again, not sure if suspension settings, geometry or just not appropriate bike...

Posted: Jul 13, 2022 at 7:17 Quote
cucupebicicleta wrote:
Joining in this discussion as I'm directly interested in the exact question being asked here.

A bit of backstory. I have a 2014 Kona Hei Hei (https://2014.konaworld.com/hei_hei.cfm) and over time I've changed every single part on it except the frame and shock.

Initially it came with 29 wheels but I've changed them with 27.5 ones with bigger 2.6 tires. The fork is a Fox 36 with 160mm travel.

Riding it harder and on jumps it feels weird. Standing on the pedals it feels I'm too high and too forward. I don't know if it's me because I've taken almost a 15 year break since riding DH or I messed up the geometry.

How bad is this holding me back with the tiny rear travel and completely different purpose geometry if I keep riding it on flow and jump trails. Btw, the jumps feel like they throw me forward way too much... again, not sure if suspension settings, geometry or just not appropriate bike...

In terms of getting thrown forward, try backing off the rebound. If you jump with too much rebound, it will pitch the bike forward in the air right after takeoff, because the rear wheel will kick downward against the lip. Another solution (which can be more jump/situation specific) is to make sure that you pop your upper body vertical at takeoff and really mentally commit to the jump.

I recall that is an xc bike... so the general rider placement/posture on that bike will be "high and forward" like you experience, because the bike is designed more for speed over undulating terrain and climbs. This is a function of the geometry. By modern standards, this bike has a steep headtube angle and long chainstays. You could deal with this (to an extent) by converting to mullet, getting an angleset, using a shorter stem, adding headtube risers, riding with as much sag as possible in the rear shock.

But generally, this bike will hold you back on jump lines as a function of the geometry. Not saying you can't have a load of fun on this bike, but the frame is optimized more for xc riding than jump/flow lines. Of course, the ultimate thing that defines your riding is your skill and style, so I am not saying you can't send it hard on this bike, but it will be harder to jump this bike, with a reasonable amount of stability, than say, a bike with shorter chainstays, a slacker headtube, and a frame that places you more in the middle of the frame than geometry that puts you tall and forward.

Posted: Jul 13, 2022 at 8:19 Quote
MT36 wrote:

In terms of getting thrown forward, try backing off the rebound. If you jump with too much rebound, it will pitch the bike forward in the air right after takeoff, because the rear wheel will kick downward against the lip. Another solution (which can be more jump/situation specific) is to make sure that you pop your upper body vertical at takeoff and really mentally commit to the jump.

I recall that is an xc bike... so the general rider placement/posture on that bike will be "high and forward" like you experience, because the bike is designed more for speed over undulating terrain and climbs. This is a function of the geometry. By modern standards, this bike has a steep headtube angle and long chainstays. You could deal with this (to an extent) by converting to mullet, getting an angleset, using a shorter stem, adding headtube risers, riding with as much sag as possible in the rear shock.

But generally, this bike will hold you back on jump lines as a function of the geometry. Not saying you can't have a load of fun on this bike, but the frame is optimized more for xc riding than jump/flow lines. Of course, the ultimate thing that defines your riding is your skill and style, so I am not saying you can't send it hard on this bike, but it will be harder to jump this bike, with a reasonable amount of stability, than say, a bike with shorter chainstays, a slacker headtube, and a frame that places you more in the middle of the frame than geometry that puts you tall and forward.

Thank you! This is very helpful. Yes, it is very much an XC bike and eventually I will try to find another one but for now we much make this work. This is the first time I hear about an "angleset" and it seems like a good idea to try. I do already run the extremely short renthal stem, added all the spacers under it and the fork is significantly longer than the stock XC one. Likely I shouldn't go higher with a bar with more rise so the front end should be fine, especially if I can try to change the angle. Sadly nothing I can do about the chainstay and I'd rather keep the wheels the same.

When you mention back off rebound to not get thrown forward, do you mean on the fork or shock? Or both?

Posted: Jul 18, 2022 at 7:16 Quote
cucupebicicleta wrote:
MT36 wrote:

In terms of getting thrown forward, try backing off the rebound. If you jump with too much rebound, it will pitch the bike forward in the air right after takeoff, because the rear wheel will kick downward against the lip. Another solution (which can be more jump/situation specific) is to make sure that you pop your upper body vertical at takeoff and really mentally commit to the jump.

I recall that is an xc bike... so the general rider placement/posture on that bike will be "high and forward" like you experience, because the bike is designed more for speed over undulating terrain and climbs. This is a function of the geometry. By modern standards, this bike has a steep headtube angle and long chainstays. You could deal with this (to an extent) by converting to mullet, getting an angleset, using a shorter stem, adding headtube risers, riding with as much sag as possible in the rear shock.

But generally, this bike will hold you back on jump lines as a function of the geometry. Not saying you can't have a load of fun on this bike, but the frame is optimized more for xc riding than jump/flow lines. Of course, the ultimate thing that defines your riding is your skill and style, so I am not saying you can't send it hard on this bike, but it will be harder to jump this bike, with a reasonable amount of stability, than say, a bike with shorter chainstays, a slacker headtube, and a frame that places you more in the middle of the frame than geometry that puts you tall and forward.

Thank you! This is very helpful. Yes, it is very much an XC bike and eventually I will try to find another one but for now we much make this work. This is the first time I hear about an "angleset" and it seems like a good idea to try. I do already run the extremely short renthal stem, added all the spacers under it and the fork is significantly longer than the stock XC one. Likely I shouldn't go higher with a bar with more rise so the front end should be fine, especially if I can try to change the angle. Sadly nothing I can do about the chainstay and I'd rather keep the wheels the same.

When you mention back off rebound to not get thrown forward, do you mean on the fork or shock? Or both?

You bed dude, no worries.
Back of rebound on the shock so it doesn't pitch you forward. If you go too soft on the rebound you may not get as much pop on the takeoff also... so it's a balance.

Posted: Aug 10, 2022 at 3:05 Quote
Slopeduro, check out 50to01 TV on YouTube for bikes that fit this riding style. They have a lot videos showing off steez on all terrains and jumps, big to small. Check ‘‘em out.

They’re sponsored by Santa Cruz but there’s sometimes other riders who are not and they are riding other brand bikes.

www.YouTube.com/c/50to01/videos They just dropped a video Tuesday August 9th.

Enjoy

Posted: Aug 14, 2022 at 21:31 Quote
if your getting pitched foward slow your rebound down .it will help


A bit of backstory. I have a 2014 Kona Hei Hei (https://2014.konaworld.com/hei_hei.cfm) and over time I've changed every single part on it except the frame and shock.

Initially it came with 29 wheels but I've changed them with 27.5 ones with bigger 2.6 tires. The fork is a Fox 36 with 160mm travel.

Riding it harder and on jumps it feels weird. Standing on the pedals it feels I'm too high and too forward. I don't know if it's me because I've taken almost a 15 year break since riding DH or I messed up the geometry.

How bad is this holding me back with the tiny rear travel and completely different purpose geometry if I keep riding it on flow and jump trails. Btw, the jumps feel like they throw me forward way too much... again, not sure if suspension settings, geometry or just not appropriate bike...[/Quote]

Posted: Aug 14, 2022 at 21:37 Quote
hello I felt the same on my 2020 scott ransom .slowed my rebound down add 10 air to rear shock .rocksox nude for ransom still 30% sag 20 in my rockshox yari no spacers 100psi it fly off jumps

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