DH vs Enduro bike for park?

PB Forum :: Downhill
DH vs Enduro bike for park?
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Message
Posted: Jul 22, 2021 at 22:16 Quote
I am strictly a park rider (albeit a fairly average one) and have been on DH bikes now for several years. What I am wondering is, will I have better success jumping by switching to an enduro bike. I am not hitting big jumps, just small and medium tables in the park. Sometimes I feel the heavy tires and 200mm suspension are sapping my "pop." I am not much for tech trails anymore and prefer flow jump lines.

Would I have better results by getting an enduro instead?

Posted: Jul 22, 2021 at 22:57 Quote
mastakilla wrote:
I am strictly a park rider (albeit a fairly average one) and have been on DH bikes now for several years. What I am wondering is, will I have better success jumping by switching to an enduro bike. I am not hitting big jumps, just small and medium tables in the park. Sometimes I feel the heavy tires and 200mm suspension are sapping my "pop." I am not much for tech trails anymore and prefer flow jump lines.

Would I have better results by getting an enduro instead?
a mullet super enduro. or even something like Lewis has done with his Norco range with a DH fork.

Posted: Jul 23, 2021 at 3:58 Quote
mastakilla wrote:
I am strictly a park rider (albeit a fairly average one) and have been on DH bikes now for several years. What I am wondering is, will I have better success jumping by switching to an enduro bike. I am not hitting big jumps, just small and medium tables in the park. Sometimes I feel the heavy tires and 200mm suspension are sapping my "pop." I am not much for tech trails anymore and prefer flow jump lines.

Would I have better results by getting an enduro instead?

100% yes. If you are riding flow trails etc, then a lighter and shorter travel enduro bike will jump better and probably be faster too. If you aren't riding rough trails super fast then I don't think you are getting the full use of the DH bike.

Posted: Jul 23, 2021 at 8:23 Quote
For a purely park rider, as you say, I'd encourage you to play with set up on your DH bike first. You can certainly make the bike more "poppy" with suspension adjustments and tire pressure alone. What casing tire or inserts are you running? Getting rid of the heavy rotational mas via heavy casing and insert will make a very very dramatic difference in all riding characteristics (pedaling, cornering, braking, jumping). Also how is your cockpit set up? Adjustments here can help optimize a jump bias vs steep tech bias.

Those are changes you can make quickly and cheaper than buying a new bike, so give it a go!! Your DH bike is certainly not holding you back from jumping, but your setup might be. Also, take this as respectfully as possible, buy a half day jump clinic or private lesson. Again, cheaper than a new bike and will help sooo much. Even top athletes have riding coaches, not enough amateurs/weekend warriors like us utilize this. Modify your skills before blaming/changing the bike.

Will the enduro bike be better for purely park laps?
Not likely. Park flow trails typically have horrendous braking bumps, especially on the more blue-ish trails that most people ride. A DH bike handles these dramatically better than an enduro, which means you can carry higher speeds, while incurring less rider fatigue, and ultimately ride more laps to build skills. DH bikes are also built with bigger brakes and stronger parts. Again less fatigue on your body and likely less maintenance for you. Lastly the geometry of most DH bikes takes everything a touch farther (longer, slacker) than enduro...giving that extra margin of error when things go bad.

Posted: Jul 23, 2021 at 15:05 Quote
CSdirt wrote:
For a purely park rider, as you say, I'd encourage you to play with set up on your DH bike first. You can certainly make the bike more "poppy" with suspension adjustments and tire pressure alone. What casing tire or inserts are you running? Getting rid of the heavy rotational mas via heavy casing and insert will make a very very dramatic difference in all riding characteristics (pedaling, cornering, braking, jumping). Also how is your cockpit set up? Adjustments here can help optimize a jump bias vs steep tech bias.

Those are changes you can make quickly and cheaper than buying a new bike, so give it a go!! Your DH bike is certainly not holding you back from jumping, but your setup might be. Also, take this as respectfully as possible, buy a half day jump clinic or private lesson. Again, cheaper than a new bike and will help sooo much. Even top athletes have riding coaches, not enough amateurs/weekend warriors like us utilize this. Modify your skills before blaming/changing the bike.

Will the enduro bike be better for purely park laps?
Not likely. Park flow trails typically have horrendous braking bumps, especially on the more blue-ish trails that most people ride. A DH bike handles these dramatically better than an enduro, which means you can carry higher speeds, while incurring less rider fatigue, and ultimately ride more laps to build skills. DH bikes are also built with bigger brakes and stronger parts. Again less fatigue on your body and likely less maintenance for you. Lastly the geometry of most DH bikes takes everything a touch farther (longer, slacker) than enduro...giving that extra margin of error when things go bad.

i am running dh maxxis tires and tubes at 25psi. i settled on this after finding it never flats or mashes a rim and there is no sealant to mess with. just have to go shop for tire install, no way i could get the dh tires on the rims. i think i could get away with a lighter front tire i suppose. i am fairly wedded to dh tire for the rear, its just bulletproof at least for me

as far as tire pressure goes, should i try above 25. i have never wanted to run higher for fear of losing grip and washing out

as far as suspension, i am fairly clueless. i set it up as per the fox website and thats where it stands

yeah i agree, alot or most of it is prolly down to the rider, poor craftsman blaming his tools and whatnot. i actually have done park lessons in the past, when i first started jumps. some of it is fear committing to pop but other times i feel like its the shear girthiness of the bike sucking my pop energy.

Posted: Jul 24, 2021 at 0:43 Quote
You have a shop install your tires?
Go tubless.
Just do it.

Fox's baseline is probably pretty meh.
Make sure your pressure or springs are right.
Set sag...
Experiment with speeding up your rebound.

Re tires.
If your running 25 rear no problem I'd bet you can run 21 front no problem. I advise you run low as you can without the tire squirming in your fastest corners.

Posted: Jul 24, 2021 at 9:26 Quote
mastakilla wrote:
I am strictly a park rider (albeit a fairly average one) and have been on DH bikes now for several years. What I am wondering is, will I have better success jumping by switching to an enduro bike. I am not hitting big jumps, just small and medium tables in the park. Sometimes I feel the heavy tires and 200mm suspension are sapping my "pop." I am not much for tech trails anymore and prefer flow jump lines.

Would I have better results by getting an enduro instead?

I see your from Vegas so I’m guessing youve ridden snow summit. I’ve ridden a YT Tues and a YT Capra at summit and I’d definitely say the Capra does much better on the flow trails. Still a big enough bike to handle all the tech trails they have as well though. I think the perfect park bike would be a Capra 27.5 with Öhlins front and rear and DT Swiss rims. Just my preference lol

Posted: Jul 24, 2021 at 13:46 Quote
riding skills and experience I think play a part between being able to use a DH and enduro platform efficiently to an extent. DH'ing an enduro takes a bit more finesse and smoothness while on a DH bike you can otherwise blow through rough stuff

Previous Page | Next Page

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.005907
Mobile Version of Website