Pedal kickback when turning?

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Pedal kickback when turning?
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Posted: Sep 20, 2021 at 13:34 Quote
Hello all.
I've noticed that when I am turning, particularly in rocky, or rutted sections, I get pedal kickback and my feet end up getting involuntarily re-positioned.

Through the same terrain, it doesnt happen much when I am going straight.

My theory is that I am not able to weight my feet as much when turning, because I end up l, most of the time, with a slightly more forward bias to "dig in".

Does anyone else get this, or has anyone else gotten this and figured out how to avoid it?

Thanks!

Posted: Sep 20, 2021 at 18:54 Quote
Few things

Flats or clips?
Bike shoes or sneakers?

These little things make a difference

The ball of your foot should be on the pedal with the heel dropped. This is how you get traction.

Posted: Sep 20, 2021 at 19:53 Quote
Kawasaki2 wrote:
Few things

Flats or clips?
Bike shoes or sneakers?

These little things make a difference

The ball of your foot should be on the pedal with the heel dropped. This is how you get traction.

Flats with proper bike shoes.
It rarely happens in the straights (though it has happened), and happens more in the turns, particularly the flat ones.
Since the shoes are so darn grippy, it's hard to reposition my feet. But I need that grip.

Posted: Sep 20, 2021 at 22:25 Quote
paleforks wrote:
Kawasaki2 wrote:
Few things

Flats or clips?
Bike shoes or sneakers?

These little things make a difference

The ball of your foot should be on the pedal with the heel dropped. This is how you get traction.

Flats with proper bike shoes.
It rarely happens in the straights (though it has happened), and happens more in the turns, particularly the flat ones.
Since the shoes are so darn grippy, it's hard to reposition my feet. But I need that grip.

I had this exact thing happen to me, (i wasnt sure if kickback or just my suspension kicking me) i struggle with foot position on flats and it never feels like they are in the same spot/correct spot.

Been on clips for 2 months and love the position but struggling to find a good shoe with comfort and ideal cleat position, its been either ither lol

Posted: Sep 20, 2021 at 22:50 Quote
Do you mean (A) your feet are getting bounced off the pedals? Or (B) the pedals/crank are rotating to not be where you want them? Just trying to clarify because it sounds like you mean (A) but I thought the term 'pedal kickback' refers to (B).

Posted: Sep 20, 2021 at 23:39 Quote
Gravelben wrote:
Do you mean (A) your feet are getting bounced off the pedals? Or (B) the pedals/crank are rotating to not be where you want them? Just trying to clarify because it sounds like you mean (A) but I thought the term 'pedal kickback' refers to (B).

(A) specifically, and mostly when turning.
But it could also be (B) that then creates (A) and I'm not realizing it.

Which is more likely to happen in a turn?

My theory is that it happens because I shift a lot of weight forward when I turn, and also because my foot position changes, but I wanted to verify with other riders who have had the same experiences.

Posted: Sep 21, 2021 at 0:10 Quote
paleforks wrote:
Gravelben wrote:
Do you mean (A) your feet are getting bounced off the pedals? Or (B) the pedals/crank are rotating to not be where you want them? Just trying to clarify because it sounds like you mean (A) but I thought the term 'pedal kickback' refers to (B).

(A) specifically, and mostly when turning.
But it could also be (B) that then creates (A) and I'm not realizing it.

Which is more likely to happen in a turn?

My theory is that it happens because I shift a lot of weight forward when I turn, and also because my foot position changes, but I wanted to verify with other riders who have had the same experiences.

Yeah it could be that - normally dropping your heels helps keep your feet planted, but moving your weight a long way forward (especially if it's a bike with long reach) might cause you to lift your heels and lighten your feet too much.

I was just thinking in flatter corners (big berms are different) you would (should) rotate your outside pedal down and load more weight onto that foot with the bike leaning under you, if you weren't loading the outside foot enough the bike might skip about more and bounce that foot loose. Have you noticed any connection between which foot comes loose and which way you're turning?

I'm no expert or anything so apologies if it sounds like I'm teaching grandma to suck eggs, just trying to think through the physics of it.

Posted: Sep 21, 2021 at 6:25 Quote
noideamtber wrote:
paleforks wrote:
Kawasaki2 wrote:
Few things

Flats or clips?
Bike shoes or sneakers?

These little things make a difference

The ball of your foot should be on the pedal with the heel dropped. This is how you get traction.

Flats with proper bike shoes.
It rarely happens in the straights (though it has happened), and happens more in the turns, particularly the flat ones.
Since the shoes are so darn grippy, it's hard to reposition my feet. But I need that grip.

I had this exact thing happen to me, (i wasnt sure if kickback or just my suspension kicking me) i struggle with foot position on flats and it never feels like they are in the same spot/correct spot.

Been on clips for 2 months and love the position but struggling to find a good shoe with comfort and ideal cleat position, its been either ither lol

Yep. I'd almost rather wear regular skate shoes that really let me slide my foot around, but I know that in a lot of mtb situations, I really want that grip.

Posted: Sep 21, 2021 at 6:33 Quote
Gravelben wrote:
paleforks wrote:
Gravelben wrote:
Do you mean (A) your feet are getting bounced off the pedals? Or (B) the pedals/crank are rotating to not be where you want them? Just trying to clarify because it sounds like you mean (A) but I thought the term 'pedal kickback' refers to (B).

(A) specifically, and mostly when turning.
But it could also be (B) that then creates (A) and I'm not realizing it.

Which is more likely to happen in a turn?

My theory is that it happens because I shift a lot of weight forward when I turn, and also because my foot position changes, but I wanted to verify with other riders who have had the same experiences.

Yeah it could be that - normally dropping your heels helps keep your feet planted, but moving your weight a long way forward (especially if it's a bike with long reach) might cause you to lift your heels and lighten your feet too much.

I was just thinking in flatter corners (big berms are different) you would (should) rotate your outside pedal down and load more weight onto that foot with the bike leaning under you, if you weren't loading the outside foot enough the bike might skip about more and bounce that foot loose. Have you noticed any connection between which foot comes loose and which way you're turning?

I'm no expert or anything so apologies if it sounds like I'm teaching grandma to suck eggs, just trying to think through the physics of it.

I appreciate the response.
I do weight the outside foot on most flat turns, which really helps, but I also like to keep them level at times.
Maybe I should learn how to do that and then reposition, even if a feature is directly after it.


The phenomena seems to be independent of speed.
It's happened when going very slow, and when going very fast, so velocity doesn't seem to make a difference.

It's rarely enough to cause a total foot loss, but I temporarily lose the pedals and my feet end up in a different position so it's extremely rapid.


I might dedicate a day to only or mostly turning to try and isolate the situation.

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