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Recommendations for 1x setup

PB Forum :: Bikes, Parts, and Gear
Recommendations for 1x setup
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Posted: Dec 5, 2021 at 19:39 Quote
Have an 2009 Jamis Dragon hardtail frame. Looking to do a 1x setup, and I've read about parts needed, but I know parts aren't universal.

So when looking, what do I need to refer to on the bike to ensure the crank will fit, the cassette will fit, etc...

Any recommendations on complete kits to look at? Gonna do 1x10 or 1x11. I'm in Florida, and it's flat here. I'm also not a speed demon or hitting jumps. Just trail riding. Green, blue, and some black trails.

Also any recommendations on tooth count? This stuff is kind of foreign to me, always just used what was ever on the bike, so this is my first time picking. I've tried to read online, but most people are out West or up North. We don't have mountains, just gradual inclines and declines with the occasional hill.

Thanks

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 6:50 Quote
There isn't a 'complete kit' so you're going to have to be creative and figure things out.
First thing is I think you should save your money. That's an old bike and the parts you'll end up purchasing will probably be more expensive than the bike. If you want a 1x setup then just put the chain on the front gear you like and don't shift it anymore. Done.
But if you're intent on doing this because you like spending money or because you have access to free parts then here you go:
You have to remove the front derailleur. Easy to do with minimal fuss and no special tools.
Then you have to remove the crankset. This will probably require a special tool or large allen wrench depending on what's currently installed.
Then you have to buy a new crankset that fits your bottom bracket diameter and spindle length.
You may need a new bottom bracket to fit the new crankset to modern diameter standards. You should replace it anyhow because it's old and probably needs to be replaced. You're already there so make it right.
Then you have to install them. That will require a special tool depending on what crankset and bottom bracket you purchased.
Then you need to ride that bad boy.
Seth did a video of a conversion on his Berm Peak YouTube channel. I recommend checking out his 'Flip Bike' videos.https://www.youtube.com/c/SethsBikeHacks/videos

Good luck.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 7:48 Quote
BenLow2019 wrote:
There isn't a 'complete kit' so you're going to have to be creative and figure things out.
First thing is I think you should save your money. That's an old bike and the parts you'll end up purchasing will probably be more expensive than the bike. If you want a 1x setup then just put the chain on the front gear you like and don't shift it anymore. Done.

Good luck.

It's a frame only. Well, some other parts, but no drivetrain. I know people would rather buy a new bike vs put parts on an old one, but I like the frame.

Thanks for the info on the channel, I'll check it out.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 8:25 Quote
Baxter-oni wrote:
It's a frame only. Well, some other parts, but no drivetrain. I know people would rather buy a new bike vs put parts on an old one, but I like the frame.

Thanks for the info on the channel, I'll check it out.

If all you have is a frame then you'd save money by buying a used bike that is actually rideable. You will spend more on parts unless you have access to free parts.

ANYHOW, if all you have is a frame then the first step is to measure the bottom bracket shell to get the diameter and length of a new bottom bracket to fit inside it. Keep in mind that you will need a special wrench to install a new bottom bracket and different bottom brackets may use different wrenches. So don't just buy a random bottom bracket wrench and believe it works for all bottom brackets. Most modern BBs use a fairly common BB wrench, but there are some weird ones out there.
The inner diameter of the bottom bracket must be matched to the crankset spindle diameter you want to purchase. AND the crankset spindle length much be matched to the new bottom bracket length. Keep your final product in mind before you get the bottom bracket. It is possible to buy a crankset with the right diameter but too short or too long a spindle - they come in a variety of sizes to fit different bottom brackets.
Good luck.

Posted: Dec 7, 2021 at 2:04 Quote
The biggest factor in my view is just money.

-If you are on a budget just get a derailleur dropper, and one of those jumbo sunshine cassettes. They usually come with an extra long screw for your derailleur to replace the B-tension bolt giving you extra clearance for the big gear. The derailleur dropper also gives you a bunch more clearance. It will cost 40$ all in and give you 11-46t range. You can run whatever 9 or 10 speed setup you have and it should be able to shift into the big gear... The downside is no clutch, and on a hardtail a clutch is almost a must. For reference a standard 9 speed cassette is 11-34T, and a standard 10 speed is 11-36T. This is usually run as a 3X or 2X though. In my view for trail riding I would say 11-42 will cut it if you are ok sacrificing a bit of climbing, or a bit of top speed. 11-46t is satisfactory for everything, and 50+ will do everything well.

-If you are not on a budget most 10 speeds can't clear large cogs too well. Usually they need to be modded, sometimes even a derailleur dropper is needed. You can expect around 11-42T range on a 10 speed. So I would say go 11 if you want super climbing power. For what you have described 10 sounds like it will cut it. I have little experience with 11s though so I couldn't recommend a good one, but for 10 speed go shimano for sure. 1X10 slx clutch probably is best dollar to quality ratio.

-The best in my view is the box 2 drivetrain kit 1X9. Although it's a 9 speed you get 11-50t range. Less cogs are better in my view unless you are an xc rider.
Less gears = you can shift through them much more rapidly, which is important for sudden hills
Less gears = fatter bigger cogs/chains = stronger
Less gears = less weight
Less gears = more space between gears = vibration/bending has less of an effect = more precise shifting

If you are an XC rider though 9 speed doesn't cut it. Too much variance between shifts.

Posted: Dec 9, 2021 at 23:59 Quote
My bike setup is 11 speed derailleur with 8 speed shifter and cassete (11-42t), 30t chainring.

Bike check :
KHS DJ200 Trail Bike 27.5 #8speedmtb - dxbike11's Bike Check - Vital MTB -

This one is using 12 speed derailleur with same 8 speed shifter and cassette (11-42t), 32t chainring. :
Federal Cycle T160 Dual Crown Mullet Enduro #8speedmtb - dxbike11's Bike Check - Vital MTB -

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