Evil choices for old man….advice sought

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Evil choices for old man….advice sought
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Posted: Aug 6, 2022 at 15:44 Quote
I moved to Nelson BC 3 years back and bought and evil offering v1 with 150mm pike. I’m 44 185lbs 5 ft 11 and fairly cautious by nature. My riding buddies are mostly Canadian and all better than me. I’m still improving pretty rapidly, most of the local trails are pretty challenging. They all have slacker bikes. I tried a V3 wreckoning and it seemed to make everything a lot easier! My legs are short as shit and I don’t have that much self suspension available.
Should I a) buy a wreckoning, time is not my friend so max it out now b) keep the offering and harden up - loose some weight and do some more riding, maybe get a lesson c) mod the offering, bigger fork? angled headset?
Thanks for your opinions!

Posted: Aug 6, 2022 at 18:45 Quote
Motdoc wrote:
I moved to Nelson BC 3 years back and bought and evil offering v1 with 150mm pike. I’m 44 185lbs 5 ft 11 and fairly cautious by nature. My riding buddies are mostly Canadian and all better than me. I’m still improving pretty rapidly, most of the local trails are pretty challenging. They all have slacker bikes. I tried a V3 wreckoning and it seemed to make everything a lot easier! My legs are short as shit and I don’t have that much self suspension available.
Should I a) buy a wreckoning, time is not my friend so max it out now b) keep the offering and harden up - loose some weight and do some more riding, maybe get a lesson c) mod the offering, bigger fork? angled headset?
Thanks for your opinions!

Personally I’d say that getting the bigger bike just because it is easier to ride on some of the harder trails is not a good reason- however if the trails you are riding are really chunky then having more suspension would be better. I always tell people to start on a hardtail then get a full suspension. Applying that here if the bigger bike makes it easier because it absorbs more it is Jusr covering up the main issue of your rider skill. I would encourage you to maybe get some coaching and ride a lot, but take it easier. Don’t go slamming down fast, take time to skillful ride the trail. Find good lines, develop skills like hops, track stands, front pivots etc. once you get these skills down really well then make your decision about buying a bigger bike. In terms of the angled headset, it can be good in some cases but I always warn people to know the reason they want it. If you are trying to make a bike something it is not it can often be a waste of time. Good luck and have fun with it.

Posted: Aug 8, 2022 at 2:12 Quote
I'd definitely echo the previous poster's advice about getting some tuition, I've had a few lessons this year and it's made a massive difference to my riding, really improving my confidence and getting me to know what I *should* be doing as well as working towards it.

Better technique takes away a lot of the need for bigger travel whilst you get it right. However, as you tend to be travelling at higher speeds with more potential/kinetic energy, the consequences for making a mistake are higher. A bigger bike can increase your safety margin for these.

The downsides of a bigger bike are that they can be harder to move around, and tend to be a bit of a pig on mellower trails. Pedalling along with your mates when you're overbiked can really suck the fun out of a ride. As previously mentioned they can lead to relying on the bike to get you through stuff, which is all well and good until you come to something that can't be dealt with by ploughing.

Lastly, apart from the environmental consequences of a bike change, there is also the opportunity cost. Money spent on a new bike is money that can't be spent on other things such as lessons and trips to riding destinations.

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