Stained wood vs Treated?

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Stained wood vs Treated?
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Posted: Aug 19, 2022 at 4:43 Quote
Anybody know if stained pine 2x6's lasts as long as treated for making wooden features?

Posted: Aug 19, 2022 at 6:38 Quote
Pb5ZbL7y wrote:
Anybody know if stained pine 2x6's lasts as long as treated for making wooden features?
You’re missing too many variables for anyone to give you a concrete answer.
What stain are you using? Solid, semi-solid? What kind of wood are you using? Pine, cedar, teak? What conditions will the wood be exposed to? Dry and sandy in the shade or wet and muddy without shade?

Generally speaking, wood that has been pressure treated and designed for ground contact will outlast the same kind of wood that is only stained. You can still use stained wood for features and they may last a good while, but if you don’t provide regular maintenance and reapply the treatment it will certainly decay.

Good luck.

Posted: Aug 19, 2022 at 6:42 Quote
I see you mentioned pine. Missed that on the first read. Pine rots pretty quickly without treatment but it depends on the environment and biological factors.

Posted: Aug 19, 2022 at 8:21 Quote
Yeah Im not sure what way to go yet..Id like to go with treated but it ups the cost by alot. It's Wisonsin weather so we have it all. Humid summers, 40 below winters etc. Maybe rough cut fresh 2in thick cedar would be the best idk

Posted: Aug 19, 2022 at 8:25 Quote
Pb5ZbL7y wrote:
Yeah Im not sure what way to go yet..Id like to go with treated but it ups the cost by alot. It's Wisonsin weather so we have it all. Humid summers, 40 below winters etc. Maybe rough cut fresh 2in thick cedar would be the best idk

I wouldn't spend too much on outdoor bicycle features unless I ran a bike park. And think about how many old barns that are still standing that were never made with pressure treated wood.

Just my thoughts.

Posted: Aug 19, 2022 at 8:27 Quote
Right on man I appreciate your input

Posted: Aug 19, 2022 at 8:59 Quote
The best and most cost effective wood for features I've found is hemlock. It's almost as rot resistant as cedar but much cheaper. After I build something I use it for a season and then it's dry, and I treat with a mixture of 5 parts old engine oil and 1 part diesel fuel and the wood just sucks it up. I have features that are approaching fifteen years, and for anyone about to pipe in about environmental impact, it's not even close to the hundreds of cars in Walmart parking lots leaking oil onto the asphalt.

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