which is better 06 40 rc2 or 07 888rc2x

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which is better 06 40 rc2 or 07 888rc2x
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Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 11:39 Quote
I've had 06 and 07 40's, and there's no way I'd trade them for a 888. Every fork requires some attention to maintainance. Mine have never had a problem with seals or internals at all. 40's are marketed as a high end race fork, but they will do any type of riding, plus they have internally adjustable travel. It is true that the lowers on a 40 are thinner to shave weight, but if you aren't stupid and thrash on your stuff, you should never have a problem with it. You couldn't pay me to switch away from my Fox forks.

P.S. I have the clicking sound also. There's no actual problem inside the fork, it's just a noise the spring makes.

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 11:42 Quote
take the spring out and move the rubber shrink wrap back into the middle of the spring to fix the clicking noise in the 40

edit: if you dont mind spending a bit of time on it you can try and get the spring to sit directly in the middle of the stanctions so when it compresses it doesnt hit anything
edit2: go fox

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 11:57 Quote
sherbet wrote:
When you put the new seals on, are you jamming them on?

I put them on like it tells you to in the manual.
The reason mine leak so much, is that it gets so muddy here and all of the dirt get inside the seals causing them to move away from the stanchions and let oil through. another factor is on long descents with lots of hard braking, the heat from the rotors cause the oil viscosity to go down, so the oil can seep through the seals easier.

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 12:17 Quote
dylanvarkonja wrote:
sherbet wrote:
When you put the new seals on, are you jamming them on?

I put them on like it tells you to in the manual.
The reason mine leak so much, is that it gets so muddy here and all of the dirt get inside the seals causing them to move away from the stanchions and let oil through. another factor is on long descents with lots of hard braking, the heat from the rotors cause the oil viscosity to go down, so the oil can seep through the seals easier.

It shouldnt' be heat from the rotors affecting your fork oil. It most likely is the oil inside the fork heating up from the fork working and moving inside. This happens a lot more in shocks as the oil volume is much smaller. Simply friction in action. Just another benefit of a Curnutt shock.

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 12:20 Quote
dylanvarkonja wrote:
[
another factor is on long descents with lots of hard braking, the heat from the rotors cause the oil viscosity to go down, so the oil can seep through the seals easier.

i am really hoping youre not serious

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 14:31 Quote
stryke wrote:
dylanvarkonja wrote:
[
another factor is on long descents with lots of hard braking, the heat from the rotors cause the oil viscosity to go down, so the oil can seep through the seals easier.

i am really hoping youre not serious

Whatever, it just seems that, on two trails of equal length, on the one that requires more braking there will be more oil on my stanchions/lowers. The other reason that I believe that brake affects oil density is that the seals leak more frequently on the brake side, that the side with the dampening system.
2 cents

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 17:04 Quote
dylanvarkonja wrote:
stryke wrote:
dylanvarkonja wrote:
[
another factor is on long descents with lots of hard braking, the heat from the rotors cause the oil viscosity to go down, so the oil can seep through the seals easier.

i am really hoping youre not serious

Whatever, it just seems that, on two trails of equal length, on the one that requires more braking there will be more oil on my stanchions/lowers. The other reason that I believe that brake affects oil density is that the seals leak more frequently on the brake side, that the side with the dampening system.
2 cents

Of course it couldn't be that the physical effect of braking makes the fork dive in travel and actually work, and that the seal on the left side could be worse than the right. You're talking about a little thin piece of metal that radiates little to no heat outside of an inch or two away that somehow significantly heats fork oil through the lowers. Just doesn't make much sence to me.

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 18:03 Quote
From my experiences with these forks both work equally as good and it does come down to personal choice. I've only had a few runs on a 888 but have been riding 40's for almost 2 years.

888's are the fork if you do not want to be doing a lot of maintenance and are always crashing, thrashing and trashing your rig, but they work and they work well and I'm sure the WC would be every good as the 40 but they do require a little more maintenance than the normal 888.

I have owned both 06 40's and 08 40's and both have needed regular seal changes.
One trick is to tip your bike upside down before you ride to get the oil up to the felt seals that are under the wiper because these can dry out. Also in my experience dry condtions where there is really fine dust seem's to cause the seals to fail quicker. 40's do weep oil, only a little bit but at least you know they're working and everythings getting lubricated, but it should not be pouring out.

I race and free ride and have had some massive stacks on my 40's and they have held up no trouble but I have seen some come off not so hot when taking on a big nasty rock.

I've also witnessed my mate front wheel case a 50 footer which stretched the s#%t out of his head tube but his 06 40 was sweet so they can't be all that weak.

But as I said personal choice, just pick one take, care of it and you'll have no worries tup

Posted: Jul 17, 2008 at 18:15 Quote
dylanvarkonja wrote:
stryke wrote:
dylanvarkonja wrote:
[
another factor is on long descents with lots of hard braking, the heat from the rotors cause the oil viscosity to go down, so the oil can seep through the seals easier.

i am really hoping youre not serious

Whatever, it just seems that, on two trails of equal length, on the one that requires more braking there will be more oil on my stanchions/lowers. The other reason that I believe that brake affects oil density is that the seals leak more frequently on the brake side, that the side with the dampening system.
2 cents

haha dude dylan no way is it your rotor mannnnnn its probably the force on your fork like that guy said, oh and dude are you headin to whistler during crankworx cause apparently we're headin up on the 10 now or somthing

Posted: Jul 18, 2008 at 5:34 Quote
Is there also not the problem of 40mm seals being very unreliable?

The totem had this problem and still does, my friend has had alot of previous problems with his totem seals.

I also know of someone else who has fox 40s, i think there either 06/07 model but his seals are starting to go after only recently buying them, when we finish a run of the dh track, u can see smell the oil from a couple of metres away and see it all up his stanchions.

I wonder why fox dont consider using a smaller stanchion size, 38mm, you'd lose a bit of its mega stiffness but then ud get more reliable seals and ive not seen any problems with the new 08 marzocchis 38mm seals...

Posted: Jul 18, 2008 at 5:43 Quote
Me and my mates have 40's and have never had any seal problems, only probs being that two of 'em had a few hit and miss issues with the bladder.
Think mine are early 06. Been Fort bill, Cwm carn, raced two seasons and ridden most weekends, not a single service or problem.

Posted: Jul 18, 2008 at 11:25 Quote
olynch wrote:
Is there also not the problem of 40mm seals being very unreliable?

The totem had this problem and still does, my friend has had alot of previous problems with his totem seals.

I also know of someone else who has fox 40s, i think there either 06/07 model but his seals are starting to go after only recently buying them, when we finish a run of the dh track, u can see smell the oil from a couple of metres away and see it all up his stanchions.

I wonder why fox dont consider using a smaller stanchion size, 38mm, you'd lose a bit of its mega stiffness but then ud get more reliable seals and ive not seen any problems with the new 08 marzocchis 38mm seals...

The issue is because Fox doesn't use a separate dust wiper and seal, they're the same thing. This tends to keep the legs more lubricated, and keeps it from gathering any sticktion, meaning it'll be more sensitive.

Posted: Jul 18, 2008 at 11:43 Quote
Sorry folks but here's how it is. 40's are lighter, stiffer, and some people THINK that they are better for racing. 888s are heavier, not quite as stiff but pretty damn stiff, and can take a mean beating. I have seen numerous toasted 40's. Arches snapped, sticks jammed through the lowers, cracked dropouts, and everyone knows that the seals go out like nothign else. They are a race fork and need to be treated as so. I ride in really tight quarters where you go through rocks two feet away from eachother, and I dont' wanna dent my lowers. I have had a 888 VF2 for two years and upgraded to a 888 RC2x VA and had it for a eyar. I never serviced the first one and it felt the same as new. The new one i serviced only after break in period to rid the metal flaked oil. I have hit the lowers on rocks and they don't dent. They are stiff as hell. I have ridden fox 40s on three different bikes. I think that they feel like shit but thats just me. I dont' like the damping in them. What it comes down to is this, the 40s are the best of the two for race forks, and that is fine. They have proven well, though need to be treated tenderly, and parts replaced. 888s are great for racing as well, but also for just general thrashing about and putting away for later. And yes I have seen broken 888s (far fewer). And sometimes seals do go out. But lets admit it, this is a much rarer occasion. So pick your poison. If i were a racer, personally i would be rocking Boxxers anyhow. All the current options for dh forks are great, except for White Brothers and other no name brands that tend to suck.

Posted: Jul 18, 2008 at 11:51 Quote
Mate i rode 40s for nearly a year did nothing to them and they were sound. I been riding my new set for months in the best of british weather (mud) and they to are sound. In my experiance they are not the high maintenance forks people keep saying.

Posted: Jul 18, 2008 at 12:07 Quote
ropeaccessryan wrote:
Mate i rode 40s for nearly a year did nothing to them and they were sound. I been riding my new set for months in the best of british weather (mud) and they to are sound. In my experiance they are not the high maintenance forks people keep saying.

Because the seals aren't nearly as affected by mud as they are for dust and sandy dirt.

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