2 years old carbon bars: replace or all good?

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2 years old carbon bars: replace or all good?
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Posted: Oct 4, 2022 at 11:15 Quote
I’m riding a Oneup for 2 years now. After watching this and shared it with some riding buddies, they told me I’m crazy to ride such an “old” carbon bar, I should replace it asap. No marks, some crashes but nothing huge. Are they messing around with me or should I be concerned?

https://youtube.com/shorts/kvc14uT0mU8?feature=share

Posted: Oct 4, 2022 at 11:36 Quote
I mean, that was probably a new carbon bar, and it broke too, so riding an old one is a death sentence....

If you've crashed it and it's sustained damage, then yes it absolutely needs replacing, but just because it's two years old? No. My road bike frame is 7 years old, that doesn't need replacing. Do people replace their carbon MTB frames, cranks, etc after two years? Not really.

Posted: Oct 4, 2022 at 11:37 Quote
Your buddies are premadonnas. Of coarse you already know this. Following their logic, a carbon frame would need to be replaced annually; as the frame takes far more abuse. Mattress companies pull the same b.s. too. You only need to replace your mattress if you been with some skank and your new girlfriend refuses to sleep on it.

O+
Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 7:48 Quote
Replace with alloy bars. I have seen/heard too many stories of people snapping carbon bars and ending up in the hospital. It's not worth it to even have the slightest chance of snapping my bars when you can use alloy and eliminate the chance all together.

Nothing wrong with using carbon bars if that's what you want. Chances are you will be fine, but I have nightmares about something happening like that video.

How long before someone quotes me and tells me "to use a torque wrench"?

O+
Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 7:52 Quote
You probably should just stop riding bikes, there's a huge amount of risk associated with it IMO

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 7:57 Quote
a-prince wrote:
you can use alloy and eliminate the chance all together.

That's not quite true though, is it...

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Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 8:02 Quote
TimMog wrote:
a-prince wrote:
you can use alloy and eliminate the chance all together.

That's not quite true though, is it...

I am genuinely curious if you have seen/heard of someone snapping alloy bars... I would like to start eating what they are eating.

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 9:05 Quote
gnarnaimo wrote:
You probably should just stop riding bikes, there's a huge amount of risk associated with it IMO

I ride for more than 15 years. One thing is to crash because shit happens, other is a catastrophic failure with no fault from the rider.

You have no idea of what my trials look like, what kind of jumps I do, or speed/ risks I take.

One thing’s for sure: I don’t waste my time riding with macho dudes like you.

Honest question: do people trust carbon bars? And for how long? If you don’t have the brains to understand this, keep scrolling and don’t waste your time with me.


For the rest of the answers, I am very grateful for all opinions and real life experiences

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 9:14 Quote
Pyres wrote:
Honest question: do people trust carbon bars? And for how long? If you don’t have the brains to understand this, keep scrolling and don’t waste your time with me.


For the rest of the answers, I am very grateful for all opinions and real life experiences

I ride carbon bars exclusively. I've been riding carbon bars for years and I haven't replaced any due to age. Carbon does not fatigue the same as aluminum and actually fares better than aluminum in fatigue tests. Aluminum will get harder with fatigue which leads to brittleness and fractures - carbon does not. But if you find a crack in a carbon bar then replace it ASAP. Carbon and aluminum respond differently in impact and a crack will turn to a break without warning.

Of course if you see a crack in any component you should replace it regardless.

Hope that helps. Good luck.

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 11:49 Quote
I was in the same boat as you, kinda. One day I wanted to change the stem (different length). OneUp bars, 1 year old, they were showing small marks / pressure points in the stem clamping area. I couldn't tell / decide if it was a hazard or me being over-cautious, but after some research, way too many horror stories (and videos) about carbon bars breaking all of a sudden and a couple of rides where I was not feeling in confidence anymore, I moved to alloy. It took me some time to find good alloy bars (some are really bad / way too rigid in 35 mm, Race Face for example, hence the «hate»), but I can really recommend the Chromag OSX 35. I like everything about them (precision, comfort, look). I am fine with keeping this part aluminium on my bikes from now on.

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 13:18 Quote
Carbon frame and carbon bars for me. Not something that I’ve ever worried about. All components can fail.

I also think that stories about catastrophic carbon failure are exaggerated. I know someone who’s repeatedly hammering a non-critically cracked XC frame and it’s not really progressing, similarly I cracked the gel coat on my last frame about a year into owning it, and hammered it for another five years after patching it with some resin. Only problem is that it makes the frame virtually worthless second hand as (rightly) no one else would trust it.

A riding buddy had an aluminium frame fail on them from fatigue.

So, yes I use them, and no I’m not worried about them failing.

O+
Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 13:32 Quote
a-prince wrote:
Replace with alloy bars. I have seen/heard too many stories of people snapping carbon bars and ending up in the hospital. It's not worth it to even have the slightest chance of snapping my bars when you can use alloy and eliminate the chance all together.

Nothing wrong with using carbon bars if that's what you want. Chances are you will be fine, but I have nightmares about something happening like that video.

How long before someone quotes me and tells me "to use a torque wrench"?

The video OP posted of failing bars is renthal alloy sooo....

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 14:02 Quote
a-prince wrote:
TimMog wrote:
a-prince wrote:
you can use alloy and eliminate the chance all together.

That's not quite true though, is it...

I am genuinely curious if you have seen/heard of someone snapping alloy bars... I would like to start eating what they are eating.

Seen it, yes. Riding a trials bike, did a 15ft drop and the bars sheared off, so yes it does happen. I've snapped cranks which are made of significantly more material than a handlebar.

Point is, you can break any component if you push it hard enough. Alloy is by no means indestructible

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 14:40 Quote
TimMog wrote:
a-prince wrote:
TimMog wrote:


That's not quite true though, is it...

I am genuinely curious if you have seen/heard of someone snapping alloy bars... I would like to start eating what they are eating.

Seen it, yes. Riding a trials bike, did a 15ft drop and the bars sheared off, so yes it does happen. I've snapped cranks which are made of significantly more material than a handlebar.

Point is, you can break any component if you push it hard enough. Alloy is by no means indestructible



Dude at BME snapped alloy handlebars this year in Ironton. Both can break. YGD

Posted: Oct 5, 2022 at 14:42 Quote
i would consistently bend alloy bars, Renthals just snapped which was weird.

Changed to oneups back in 2020 and never looked back, have a few sets.

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