Your Top 5 Favorite Suspension Designs

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Your Top 5 Favorite Suspension Designs
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Posted: Jul 7, 2009 at 23:55 Quote
sherbet wrote:
VPS is norco, and likely what she means.

i see, i thought she meant BMC VPS, which has changed its name to APS now.

Posted: Apr 4, 2013 at 2:13 Quote
1. Split Pivot (Devinci; fastest bikes ever!).
2. DW-link (Ironhorse; those turns!).
3. Faux Bar/4-Bar (Kona; if you like to huck).
4. Single Pivot (Foes DHS Tube and peers; it just works).
5. Freedrive (Mongoose; good pedaling and awesome wheel path).

Honorable Mention...VPP (Santa Cruz V10; I dare you to bottom out!).

Posted: Apr 4, 2013 at 2:43 Quote
Whoa! Grave dig and a half haha!

Posted: Apr 5, 2013 at 5:38 Quote
1.freedrive,I drive( mongoose teocali)
2.dw link (ibis)
3. Single pivot (orange)
4.Ost+ ( lapierre)
5. Fsr ( four bar)

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 0:32 Quote
1. Trek's ABP Full Floater, its just the best
2. KTM's PDS Full Floater, for working kinda like the Trek
3. Polygon's FS2 Full Floater (Collosus DHX), for working kinda like the Trek and the KTM
4. Norco's ART Suspension, for being reliable and always active
5. Yeti 303 and SB66 just for being original and thinking outside of the box

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 7:38 Quote
So what exactly makes ABP the best? I was always under the impression it was FSR but with more suspension arc and therefore less efficiency and more brake feedback.

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 8:17 Quote
This video is the best explanation I've come across of it.

I always though that DW's Split Pivot would be the most similar to ABP as it has the concentric pivot right on the wheel dropout, though I still don't quite understand how the floating brake works on that.

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 8:22 Quote
harriieee wrote:
This video is the best explanation I've come across of it.

I always though that DW's Split Pivot would be the most similar to split pivot as it has the concentric pivot right on the wheel dropout, though I still don't quite understand how the floating brake works on that.

The brake is connected to the seat stay, so it's on a floating plain. On a faux bar bike, the brake is mounted onto the chain stay, which runs on a pivot attached to the main frame, and is therefore not floating.

ABP and Split Pivot were designed to be FSR like without infringing on the copyright. Everything I have read and researched points to it being a less efficient version of FSR.

One of the largest reasons you have pedalling and braking feedback is the rear wheel's arc. When it's on an arc towards the frame, hitting the brake is going to force the suspension to extend, and hard on the pedals will cause the suspension to squat. FSR has less of this feedback as the rear wheel follows a more vertical path.

My question was loaded to be honest. ABP is neat, and I can see why people love it, I just find it funny that the better version of the same suspension is listed lower on his picks.

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 8:40 Quote
sherbet wrote:
harriieee wrote:
This video is the best explanation I've come across of it.

I always though that DW's Split Pivot would be the most similar to split pivot as it has the concentric pivot right on the wheel dropout, though I still don't quite understand how the floating brake works on that.

The brake is connected to the seat stay, so it's on a floating plain. On a faux bar bike, the brake is mounted onto the chain stay, which runs on a pivot attached to the main frame, and is therefore not floating.

ABP and Split Pivot were designed to be FSR like without infringing on the copyright. Everything I have read and researched points to it being a less efficient version of FSR.

One of the largest reasons you have pedalling and braking feedback is the rear wheel's arc. When it's on an arc towards the frame, hitting the brake is going to force the suspension to extend, and hard on the pedals will cause the suspension to squat. FSR has less of this feedback as the rear wheel follows a more vertical path.

My question was loaded to be honest. ABP is neat, and I can see why people love it, I just find it funny that the better version of the same suspension is listed lower on his picks.

Split Pivot by itself isn't very amazing, that is forsure. Devinci's don't ride nearly as nicely as the Treks and its because of that floating shock that they get the advantage. I am sure a FSR bike with a floating shock like the Trek would work pretty well, never seen it though. The floating shock is what gives the Trek its amazing acceleration, where I find FSR bikes still bob too much from pedalling alone. FSR in my mind is still probably the most active suspension system, hence why it got a mention on my list.

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 8:49 Quote
Ah, I hear ya then man! I know spec has had a few one off shocks for their line, but not a floating shock.

I'm still a DW link whore.

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 8:51 Quote
Strange, I've heard people rave like maniacs about the Wilson's ride characteristics.

FSR's too mainstream to receive love from this kind of thread.

... but more seriously, I rode FSR for years, and you almost forget it's there, it's just feels so completely neutral. It's like it has no ride characteristics. It makes it almost slightly hard to rave about or love, but I think it's still my favourite.

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 8:58 Quote
Wilson has hyper low center of gravity and dialed geometry. It's a sick bike, suspension aside. I'm not ragging on ABP either, it's a really nice design, I just feel FSR is a more refined version of the same thing.

Maestro is also boring, but pretty good at the end of the day.

Posted: Apr 6, 2013 at 20:17 Quote
excuse me, excuse me. imma let you finish but vpp is the best suspension.
good pedaling platform.

Posted: Apr 7, 2013 at 8:07 Quote
harriieee wrote:
Strange, I've heard people rave like maniacs about the Wilson's ride characteristics.

FSR's too mainstream to receive love from this kind of thread.

... but more seriously, I rode FSR for years, and you almost forget it's there, it's just feels so completely neutral. It's like it has no ride characteristics. It makes it almost slightly hard to rave about or love, but I think it's still my favourite.

The Wilson uses a different system then the rest of the bikes in Devinci's line up. The shock mounts to a lower link just like a VPP bike. That's going to really change the ride characteristics in such a way that it would be more comparable to an Intense M9 or a Santa Cruz V10. I was more thinking of the Dixon as a comparison which has mixed reviews.

Don't get me wrong, FSR is still a really great system. I think people tend to get too worked up about overly complex designs when generally its the more simplistic designs that work the best in terms of the number of bearings, links and their lifespan. Aslong as FSR incomporates larger laterally stiff links it can be a very good system, whereas some brands cut corners to save weight.

Posted: Apr 7, 2013 at 8:22 Quote
ohklee wrote:
The Wilson uses a different system then the rest of the bikes in Devinci's line up. The shock mounts to a lower link just like a VPP bike. That's going to really change the ride characteristics in such a way that it would be more comparable to an Intense M9 or a Santa Cruz V10.

But despite having a lower link attached to the bottom bracket, the Wilson is not a virtual pivot bike, it's a single pivot, because the 'seat stays' act as the swingarm attached to the seat tube. The lower link is just for the sake of the floating brake, no?

In an alternate universe I'd get to try one out in ten days' time at a demo day, but because I'm drowning in finals revision, no such luck for me.


 
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